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Skittle Halal or Haraam

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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 25th October 2015 21:55
Assalamualkum Warahmatullahi Wabaraktuh

I trust all is well In Shaa Allah Talaa

I just had a food question that has been coming to me from various sisters it is quite a common question aswell i believe

Is skittles Halal or Haraam?


Jazakillah/JazakAllah Khairan
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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 25th October 2015 22:09
If they are suitable for vegetarians then they are halal.

If they are not, as has been found, then they are haram because they contain blood.

See thread on Cochineal

www.muftisays.com/forums/82-the-food-section/9299-cochine...

The same goes for Smarties, M&M's etc

Under normal circumstances, these rules should be followed.
Please post questions such as the ones posed in this topic to the Ulamaa. Or click here for a vast library on islamqa.org. Alternatively, you can get support locating available answers online in the Q&A Support section of this form here
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#3 [Permalink] Posted on 25th October 2015 22:14
salaam

recently skittles have been displaying a suitable for vegetarians stamp.
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#4 [Permalink] Posted on 25th October 2015 23:52
xs11ax wrote:
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There are many American imports. I've seen both types sold together so always be careful.
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#5 [Permalink] Posted on 26th October 2015 08:25
JazakaAllah Khairan for your reply it has helped me immensely.
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#6 [Permalink] Posted on 26th October 2015 19:15
Salam, i recently contacted wrigleys to ask about skittles whether they are suitable for halal diet and they said they are not i, e. skittle are Haraam, so although the packet says suitable for vegetarians you hav to still double check because they could contain alcohol etc, below is the reply I received:


Dear ********,
Thank you for contacting us about the use of alcohol and animal/meat based ingredients in Wrigley products.
We can confirm that Skittles and Starburst are not suitable for a Halal diet.
At present we would advise that the following products ARE NOT SUITABLE for a Halal/Kosher Diet:
Altoid Mints
Lockets Cranberry & Blueberry
Tunes
Skittles: Fruits, Sours, Confused? & Wild Berry
Starburst: Original, Sour, Morphs & FaveReds
We hope this information helps and thanks again for contacting us.
Regards,
Jenny Barber
Consumer Care Administrator
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#7 [Permalink] Posted on 26th October 2015 19:48
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Jazakallah. As mentioned earlier, different countries use different ingredients. So it will depend on whom you have written to. If in the UK, then yes, that's the same default response to everyone.

There is no alcohol in the standard skittles, the issue is with the red colouring.

Many shops import from the US, so there will be variations. With regards to the other variationso f sweets and skittles, then they would need to be investigated individually.

People in countries like Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Indonesia, India, Pakistan etc should be very careful as they sell anything even in Islamic shops.

When I was with my children in a Muslim country, my kids bought some sweets that they knew was haraam back home and came back happy. I had to send them back and tell them to change the sweets because they were haram with the same haraam ingredients. The people couldn't believe they were selling haraam, but yet they continue to do so because it's cheaper to keep their business going.

Simple ingredients like Sucrose Esters of fatty acids.... are in fact Haraam, making simple sweets like "Mentos" haraam too.
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#8 [Permalink] Posted on 26th October 2015 20:17
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#9 [Permalink] Posted on 26th October 2015 21:23
xs11ax wrote:
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They've used "Beetroot Red" AKA E162 instead of E120 which is the previous colour in their ingredients.

Also bear in mind that larger packs tend to have different ingredients for some reason. This is what I found with M&M's. Maybe they are manufacturing them elsewhere.

Always read the label :)
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#10 [Permalink] Posted on 26th October 2015 23:26
I contacted thew wrigleys in UK, the skittles wer also from UK, the issue is not with the colouring in this case because if it was E120 then it wouldn't be labeled suitable for vegetarians coz E120 is not vegetarian. There must be something else in the ingredients which is not halal because the actual company themslves are staying its not halal so its best to avoid it all together and warn others too. Precaution is always better.

Also brother xs11ax not everything labelled suitable for vegetarians is halal.
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#11 [Permalink] Posted on 27th October 2015 08:11
Anonymous wrote:
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Jazakallah, good points but as I said earlier, ingredients differ. On top of that, ingredients change in different weather seasons and therefore they can't keep a blanket rule for their products and take the caution of not labelling their products as halal or kosher. hence a default answer is always safe.

Avoid anyway, it's better for your health :)
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#12 [Permalink] Posted on 27th October 2015 08:38

Anonymous wrote:
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salaam

can you please contact wrigleys again and ask them to specify which ingredient renders Skittles haram.

as they are suitable for vegetarians then i assume they have no animal content so the only other ingredient that could render it haram would be alcohol.

not all alcohol is haram so it would be good to find out specifically which type of alcohol is used.

www.central-mosque.com/index.php/General-Fiqh/alcohol-its...

if the issue is with something other than the animal or alcoholic content and i have missed something then please let me know.

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#13 [Permalink] Posted on 27th October 2015 09:37
Here's a breakdown of the Tesco supply:

Ingredients:
Sugar, Glucose Syrup, Palm Fat, Acids Citric Acid, Malic Acid, Dextrin, Maltodextrin, Flavourings, Colours E162, E171, E100, E160a, E132, E133, E163, E160e, Modified Starch, Acidity Regulator Trisodium Citrate, Glazing Agent Carnauba Wax

Palm fat from Palm oil, is one of the few highly saturated vegetable fats and is semi-solid at room temperature. Like most plant-based products, palm oil contains very little cholesterol. Palm oil is a common cooking ingredient in the tropical belt of Africa, Southeast Asia and parts of Brazil.

Citric acid is a weak organic acid with the formula C6H8O7. It is a natural preservative which is present in citrus fruits. It is also used to add an acidic or sour taste to foods and drinks.

Malic acid is an organic compound with the molecular formula C4H6O5. It is a dicarboxylic acid that is made by all living organisms, contributes to the pleasantly sour taste of fruits, and is used as a food additive.

Dextrins are a group of low-molecular-weight carbohydrates produced by the hydrolysis of starch[1] or glycogen.[2] Dextrins are mixtures of polymers of D-glucose units linked by α-(1→4) or α-(1→6) glycosidic bonds.

Dextrins can be produced from starch using enzymes like amylases, as during digestion in the human body and during malting and mashing,[3] or by applying dry heat under acidic conditions (pyrolysis or roasting). The latter process is used industrially, and also occurs on the surface of bread during the baking process, contributing to flavor, color, and crispness. Dextrins produced by heat are also known as pyrodextrins. During roasting under acid condition the starch hydrolyses and short chained starch parts partially rebranch with α-(1,6) bonds to the degraded starch molecule.[4] See also Maillard Reaction.

Dextrins are white, yellow, or brown powders that are partially or fully water-soluble, yielding optically active solutions of low viscosity. Most can be detected with iodine solution, giving a red coloration; one distinguishes erythrodextrin (dextrin that colours red) and achrodextrin (giving no colour).

White and yellow dextrins from starch roasted with little or no acid is called British gum.

Maltodextrin is a polysaccharide that is used as a food additive. It is produced from starch by partial hydrolysis and is usually found as a white hygroscopic spray-dried powder. Maltodextrin is easily digestible, being absorbed as rapidly as glucose, and might be either moderately sweet or almost flavorless. It is commonly used for the production of sodas and candy. It can also be found as an ingredient in a variety of other processed foods.

E162Betanin, or Beetroot Red, is a red glycosidic food dye obtained from beets; its aglycone, obtained by hydrolyzing away the glucose molecule, is betanidin. As a food additive, its E number is E162. Betanin degrades when subjected to light, heat, and oxygen; therefore, it is used in frozen products, products with short shelf life, or products sold in dry state. Betanin can survive pasteurization when in products with high sugar content. Its sensitivity to oxygen is highest in products with a high water content and/or containing metal cations (e.g. iron and copper); antioxidants like ascorbic acid and sequestrants can slow this process down, together with suitable packaging. In dry form betanin is stable in the presence of oxygen.

E171Titanium dioxide, also known as titanium(IV) oxide or titania, is the naturally occurring oxide of titanium, chemical formula TiO
2. When used as a pigment, it is called titanium white, Pigment White 6 (PW6), or CI 77891. Generally it is sourced from ilmenite, rutile and anatase. It has a wide range of applications, from paint to sunscreen to food colouring. When used as a food colouring, it has E number E171.

E100 AKA Curcumin
An orange yellow colour derived from the root of the curcuma (turmeric) plant.

Apart from its culinary uses, turmeric is used as a preservative, colorant and flavouring agent in many food products including baked foods, pickles and meat products.

Turmeric makes a poor fabric dye, as it is not very light fast, but is commonly used in Indian and Bangladeshi clothing, such as saris and Buddhist monks's robes. Turmeric (coded as E100 when used as a food additive) is used to protect food products from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. A curcumin and polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water-containing products. Over-coloring, such as in pickles, relishes, and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading.

In combination with annatto (E160b), turmeric has been used to color cheeses, yogurt, dry mixes, salad dressings, winter butter and margarine. Turmeric is also used to give a yellow color to some prepared mustards, canned chicken broths, and other foods (often as a much cheaper replacement for saffron).

E160aCarotene is also used as a substance to colour products such as juice, cakes, desserts, butter and margarine. It is approved for use as a food additive in the EU (listed as additive E160a) Australia and New Zealand (listed as 160a) and the US.

E132 Indigo carmine, or 5,5'-indigodisulfonic acid sodium salt, also known as indigotine or FD&C Blue #2 is a pH indicator with the chemical formula C16H8N2Na2O8S2. It is approved for use as a food colorant in the United States and in Europe. and has the E number E132.

E133Brilliant Blue FCF (Blue 1), also known under commercial names, is a colorant for foods and other substances. It is denoted by E number E133 and has a color index of 42090. It has the appearance of a reddish-blue powder. It is soluble in water, and the solution has a maximum absorption at about 628 nanometers.

It is a synthetic dye produced using aromatic hydrocarbons from petroleum.[1] It can be combined with tartrazine (E102) to produce various shades of green.

It is usually a disodium salt. The diammonium salt has CAS number 3844-45-9. Calcium and potassium salts are also permitted. It can also appear as an aluminium lake.

E163 Anthocyanins (also anthocyans; from Greek: ἀνθός (anthos) = flower + κυανός (kyanos) = blue) are water-soluble vacuolar pigments that may appear red, purple, or blue depending on the pH. They belong to a parent class of molecules called flavonoids synthesized via the phenylpropanoid pathway; they are odorless and nearly flavorless, contributing to taste as a moderately astringent sensation. Anthocyanins occur in all tissues of higher plants, including leaves, stems, roots, flowers, and fruits. Anthoxanthins are clear, white to yellow counterparts of anthocyanins occurring in plants. Anthocyanins are derived from anthocyanidins by adding sugars.

E160eApocarotenal, or trans-β-apo-8'-carotenal, is a carotenoid found in spinach and citrus fruits. Like other carotenoids, apocarotenal plays a role as a precursor of vitamin A, even though it has 50% less pro-vitamin A activity than β-carotene. The empirical chemical formula for apocarotenal is C30H40O.

Apocarotenal has an orange to orange-red colour and is used in foods, pharmaceuticals and cosmetic products. Depending on the product forms, apocarotenal is used in fat based food (margarine, sauces, salad dressing), beverages, dairy products and sweets. Its E number is E160e and it is approved for usage as a food additive in the USA, EU and Australia and New Zealand.

Modified starch, also called starch derivatives, are prepared by physically, enzymatically, or chemically treating native starch to change its properties. Modified starches are used in practically all starch applications, such as in food products as a thickening agent, stabilizer or emulsifier; in pharmaceuticals as a disintegrant; as binder in coated paper. They are also used in many other applications.

Starches are modified to enhance their performance in different applications. Starches may be modified to increase their stability against excessive heat, acid, shear, time, cooling, or freezing; to change their texture; to decrease or increase their viscosity; to lengthen or shorten gelatinization time; or to increase their visco-stability.

Trisodium citrate has the chemical formula of Na3C6H5O7. It is sometimes referred to simply as sodium citrate, though sodium citrate can refer to any of the three sodium salts of citric acid. It possesses a saline, mildly tart flavor. It is mildly basic and can be used along with citric acid to make biologically compatible buffers.

Carnauba (/kɑːrˈnɔːbə/ or /kɑːrˈnaʊbə/, carnaúba, Portuguese pronunciation: [kaʁnɐˈubɐ]), also called Brazil wax and palm wax, is a wax of the leaves of the palm Copernicia prunifera (Synonym: Copernicia cerifera), a plant native to and grown only in the northeastern Brazilian states of Piauí, Ceará, and Rio Grande do Norte. It is known as "queen of waxes" and in its pure state, usually comes in the form of hard yellow-brown flakes. It is obtained from the leaves of the carnauba palm by collecting and drying them, beating them to loosen the wax, then refining and bleaching the wax.
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#14 [Permalink] Posted on 27th October 2015 09:43
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#15 [Permalink] Posted on 26th November 2016 20:11
abu mohammed wrote:
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No that is not true if it it suitable for vegetarians it can still have alcohol so read the ingredients
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