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Jhatka Vs Zabihah

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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 26th November 2014 10:44
The Sikh Religion often accuse the Muslims of killing the animals in an inhumane manner and consider Halal Meat to be Haram upon the Sikhs!

Eating meat killed in a ritualistic manner (Kutha meat): Sikhs are strictly prohibited from eating meat killed in a ritualistic manner (such as halal or kosher, known as Kutha meat), or any meat where langar* is served. In some small Sikh Sects, i.e. Akhand Kirtani Jatha eating any meat is believed to be forbidden, but this is not a universally held belief. The meat eaten by Sikhs is known as Jhatka meat.

The Sikhs use a method called the Jhatka, and unfortunately many Muslims have sympathy for these Sikhs and question the Zabihah method, astagfirullah.

I found my self in an argument with a Muslim who was siding with the Sikh on this matter. Alhumdulillah, I was able to show them the "The Mercy Slaughter" video which I had on my phone. This showed the beauty of the Zabihah method, but unfortunately, we don't see many Muslims practice the Zabihah the way it should be practised. There are horrendous videos on the internet showing how Muslims are slaughtering animals and not following the basic principles set out by the Shariah.

Jhatka or Chatka meat (Hindi: झटका, IPA: dʒʰəʈkɑ jhaṭkā, Punjabi: ਝਟਕਾ (Gurmukhi), جھٹکا (Shahmukhi); IPA: tʃə̀ʈkɑ chàṭkā, from Sanskrit ghātaka "killing") is meat from an animal that has been killed by a single strike of a sword or axe to sever the head, as opposed to ritualistically slow slaughter (kutha) like the Jewish slaughter (shechita) or Islamic slaughter (dhabihah). It is the method preferred by many Hindus, Sikhs, and Christians.

*Langar
Langar (Punjabi: ਲੰਗਰ, Hindi: लंगर) is the term used in the Sikh religion or in Punjab in general for common kitchen/canteen where food is served in a Gurdwara to all the visitors (without distinction of background) for free. At the langar, only vegetarian food is served, to ensure that all people, regardless of their dietary restrictions, can eat as equals. Langar is open to Sikhs and non-Sikhs alike.The exception to vegetarian langar is when Nihangs (in India) serve meat on the occasion of Holla Mohalla, and call it Mahaprasad. There are also variations on langar, for example at Hazur Sahib, where meat is included. Langar is also a common term used across various units in the Indian Army, when referring to a mess,[citation needed] especially when there is no building and the food is served in open air (or through temporary arrangements like tents).
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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 26th November 2014 10:47
Hindus and jhatka
Historically and currently, those Hindus who eat meat prescribe jhatka meat. This is a common method of slaughter when Bali Sacrifices are made to some Hindu deities, however, Vedic rituals such as Agnicayana involved the strangulation of sacrificial goats. Many Shaivite Hindus engage in jhatka methods as part of religious dietary laws, as influenced by some Shakta doctrines, which permit the consumption of meat (except beef, which is universally proscribed in Hinduism). During Durga Puja and Kali Puja among some Shaivite Hindus in Punjab, Mithila, Bengal and Kashmir, Jhatka meat is the required meat for those Shaivite Hindus who eat meat. In theory, most western methods of animal killings for the purpose of meat are done with an instant blow to the head which can be interpreted as ‘jhatka’ meat. This could make it acceptable for some practising Hindus & Sikhs to classify bolt-gun killed animals as ‘jhatka’ meat.

Sikhs and jhatka
Jhatka for Sikhs is the antithesis of ritual slaughter. As stated in the official Khalsa Code of Conduct, Kutha meat is forbidden, and Sikhs are recommended to eat the jhatka form of meat, as they do not believe that any ritual gives meat a spiritual virtue (ennobles the flesh).

For Sikhs jhatka karna or jhatkaund refers to the instantaneous severing of the head of an animal with a single stroke of any weapon, with the underlying intention of killing the animal whilst causing it minimal suffering.

On religious Sikh festivals, including Hola Mohalla and Vaisakhi, at the Gurdwara of Hazur Sahib, Fatehgarh Sahib and many other Sikh Gurdwaras, jhatka meat is offered as "mahaprasad" to all visitors in a Gurdwara. This is regarded as food blessed by the Guru and should not be refused.

Buddhists and jhatka
In Mongolian culture, it is traditional to say Om mani padme hum into the ear of the animal before slaughtering it as instantly as possible .

Christians and jhatka
In terms of slaughtering animals for food, the method of jhatka (with a single strike to minimize pain) is preferred by many Christians, although the Armenian Apostolic Church, among other Orthodox Christians, have rituals that "display obvious links with shechitah, Jewish kosher slaughter."

Availability of jhatka meat
In India, there are many jhatka shops, with various bylaws requiring shops to display clearly that they sell jhatka meat.

In the past, there has been little availability of jhatka meat in the United Kingdom, so people have found themselves eating other types of meat, although jhatka has become more widely available in the United Kingdom.
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#3 [Permalink] Posted on 26th November 2014 11:09
Dr Zakir Naik responds to a Sikh Question

Audio is in Hindi and the translations is below, courtesy of video uploader.
Halalified YT Audio


Question:

Why do Muslims slaughter the animal in a ruthless manner by torturing it and slowly and painfully killing it?

Answer:

The Islamic method of slaughtering animals, known as Zabiha has been the object of much criticism from a large number of people.

Before I reply to the question, let me relate an incidence about a discussion between a Sikh and a Muslim regarding animal slaughter.

Once a Sikh asked a Muslim, "Why do you slaughter the animal painfully by cutting the throat instead of the way we do with one stroke i.e. jhatka?" The Muslim replied "We are brave and courageous and attack from the front. We are mard ka baccha (macho men), you are cowards and attack from behind".

Jokes apart, one may consider the following points, which prove that the Zabiha method is not only humane but also scientifically the best:

1. Islamic method of slaughtering animal

Zakkaytum is a verb derived from the root word Zakaah (to purify). Its infinitive is Tazkiyah which means purification. The Islamic mode of slaughtering an animal requires the following conditions to be met:

a. Animal should be slaughtered with a sharp object (knife)
The animal has to be slaughtered with a sharp object (knife) and in a fast way so that the pain of slaughter is minimised.

b. Cut wind pipe, throat and vessels of neck
Zabiha is an Arabic word which means 'slaughtered'. The 'slaughtering' is to be done by cutting the throat, windpipe and the blood vessels in the neck causing the animal's death without cutting the spinal cord.

c. Blood should be drained
The blood has to be drained completely before the head is removed. The purpose is to drain out most of the blood which would serve as a good culture medium for micro-organisms. The spinal cord must not be cut because the nerve fibres to the heart could be damaged during the process causing cardiac arrest, stagnating the blood in the blood vessels.

2. Blood is a good medium for germs and bacteria

Blood is a good media of germs, bacteria, toxins, etc. Therefore the Muslim way of slaughtering is more hygienic as most of the blood containing germs, bacteria, toxins, etc. that are the cause of several diseases is eliminated.

3. Meat remains fresh for a longer time

Meat slaughtered by Islamic way remains fresh for a longer time due to deficiency of blood in the meat as compared to other methods of slaughtering.

4. Animal does not feel pain

The swift cutting of vessels of the neck disconnects the flow of blood to the nerve of the brain responsible for pain. Thus the animal does not feel pain. While dying, the animal struggles, writhes, shakes and kicks, not due to pain, but due to the contraction and relaxation of the muscles deficient in blood and due to the flow of blood out of the body.
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