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#76 [Permalink] Posted on 11th February 2018 12:05
Asaaghir wrote:
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Subhanallah! The predictions of Rasulullah (saw) are becoming true right before our very eyes. This article was moved to the Coca cola thread, but the following excerpts from that article are very relevant to this thread:

It is also alleged that since non-khamr alcohol is used in soft-drink manufacturer soft drinks should not be branded unlawful on account of the fact that according to Imaam Abu Hanifah (rahmatullah alayh) and Imaam Abu Yusuf (rahmatullah alayh) non-khamr alcohol is taahir and if taken in non-intoxicating quantities remains halaal. This argument is not acceptable for several reasons.

(1)It is accepted that the alcohol (ethanol) used in soft drink manufacture is not khamr. However, since the past 14 centuries the Fatwa of the Hanafi Math-hab has been on the view of Imaam Muhammad (rahmatullah alayh), viz. all alcohol, be it non-khamr, is haraam and najis. The Hanafi Fuqaha have for the past 14 centuries issued the Fatwa on this view of prohibition. Today there exists no pressing need to reverse this Muftabihi view of the Hanafi Math-hab. There is no valid reason for the desire to cancel the official and standing Fatwa of the Hanafi Math-hab in regard to alcohol and issue a new Fatwa in so far as minerals are concerned. Yes, it is conceded that there is such a need in regard to medicines since it is almost impossible to find any alcohol-free medicine. On account of the real need in regard to medicine, the Fatwa of permissibility based on the viewpoint of Shaikhain (rahmatullah alayh), issued by our senior Ulama is understandable and acceptable. But, there is no such need in regard to minerals. (And all the other junk food in which alcohol is ADDED to act as a solvent, carrier, boost the taste, flavouring and so on)

(2)By declaring soft drinks made from alcoholic concentrates halaal, a door to future fitnah is being opened up. In fact the stage is being prepared for future legalization of liquor as has been predicted by Rasulullah (sallallahu alayhi wasallam).

(3)The Ruling (Fatwa) of the Hanafi Math-hab being on the view of Imaam Muhammad (rahmatullah alayh) is based on the principle of blocking the avenue for future fitnah. Ignoring this ruling and principle in regard to the unnecessary luxury of Coke, (and all the other junk food in which alcohol is ADDED to act as a solvent, carrier, boost the taste, flavouring and so on) etc., the door for fitnah is being opened in that other drinks which are generally regarded as unlawful by all our Ulama, will also come within the scope of permissibility which has been accorded to soft drinks. Barbican Beer and similar other supposedly alcohol-free beers too contain the non-khamr ethanol. Although Barbican Beer, etc., are advertised ‘alcohol-free’ they do contain ethanol-alcohol in small quantities. In view of the alcohol in very small quantities, the authorities permit such beverages to be advertised ‘alcohol free’. See annexure D. To the best of our knowledge none of our Ulama has ventured to proclaim these ‘alcohol-free’ beers halaal. Yet, these beers contain ethanol in the same quantities as do the soft drinks. In fact, Barbican Beer contains a lesser quantity of alcohol than some soft drinks. Annexure ‘D’ states that Barbican Beer contains .03% alcohol. According to Annexure ‘C’ Sparletta Lemonade contain .04% alcohol; Raspberry contains .033%; Pineapple contains .04% and Cream Soda 05%. Thus, all these flavours have more alcohol than some of the beers which our Ulama regard to be haraam. Therefore, those who claim that Coke, etc., are halaal, have no logic and no reason for maintaining that Barbican Beer and other similar beers are haraam since the soft drinks (some or most of them) contain a greater quantity of the non-khamr ethanol-alcohol than these haraam beers. Hence, in proclaiming soft drinks halaal, the door has already been opened for declaring Barbican, etc. halaal.

(4) Let us take this argument a step further. Laager and Castle Beer are unanimously regarded as haraam by our Ulama. However these beers too contain the non-khamr ethanol. While Laager beer contains about 3.6% ethanol, soft drinks contain .058 ethanol. The difference is only in quantity. But, both contain the non-khamr ethanol. Laager and Castle beer taken on the basis of the principle employed by the legalizers of soft drinks, can also be declared ‘halaal’. Thus, the avenue for fitnah has been expanded to bring Laager, Castle and similar beers within the scope of the permissibility which has been applied to soft drinks.

(5) Let us progress further with this argument. Gin and Whiskey are unanimously proclaimed haraam by our Ulama. No Aalim so far has said that a small quantity of Gin and Whiskey is halaal. Yet, these liquors contain the self-same non-khamr ethanol which soft drinks contain. Gin and Whiskey taken in small quantities do not intoxicate. On the basis of the principle employed by the legalizers of soft drinks, Gin and Whiskey too should be ‘halaal’. Thus, the door for fitnah has been opened even wider to accommodate even Gin and Whiskey. The same argument will extend to Vodka and many other liquors which contain non-khamr ethanol and which do not intoxicate if taken in small quantities.

6) It should be understood that Rasulullah’s (sallallahu alayhi wasallam) prediction about the ‘legalizing of liquor’ will not take place overnight. It will be a gradual process – a process which has already been initiated by those who regard soft drinks to be halaal. The modernists and the ulama-e-soo’ will sooner or later set into motion the technicalities of Fiqhi principles to legalize all liquor on the basis of the non-khamr alcohol content and on the principle of small quantities which do not intoxicate. It is only short-sighted persons and those who are not concerned much with the morals of the Ummah who will venture to be so careless and proclaim soft drinks permissible without even having properly investigated the matter and without thinking of the future and of Rasulullah’s (sallallahu alayhi wasallam) prediction. Of importance regarding this issue is the fact that the view of even the Shaafi, Maliki and Hambali Math-habs conforms with the verdict of the Hanafi Math-hab, namely, all types of alcohol are najis and haraam.

Rasulullah (sallallahu alayhi wasallam) said: "Whatever intoxicates in a large quantity, even its little quantity is forbidden." "Every intoxicant is haraam."

It does not behove the Ulama to issue such verdicts which are of neither worldly nor spiritual benefit to the Ummah and serve only the purpose of boosting the monetary interests of the kuffaar.
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#77 [Permalink] Posted on 27th February 2018 13:29
I had emailed Mufti Abdur Rahman a while back with a link to this thread and my detailed questions. He did reply and say that a video was going to be uploaded soon and that should suffice as an answer. if not then I could get back to him for more details.

For me, the answer does suffice considering it is a quick general answer to the public and not specific to what I had asked. However, others will no doubt bring out the if's and but's.

Alcohol Free Beers starting from 1 minute 30 seconds
Halalified YT Audio

Q&A: Alcohol Issues | Mufti Abdur-Rahman ibn Yusuf
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#78 [Permalink] Posted on 4th March 2018 17:52
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#79 [Permalink] Posted on 18th February 2019 14:39
Goodmorning!!!
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#80 [Permalink] Posted on 18th February 2019 14:44
Good afternoon (UK time).

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#81 [Permalink] Posted on 18th February 2019 18:25
Interesting read.

It's amazing how the concept of genuine difference of opinion is a foreign concept now.

One group of people will shove the strictest opinion down our throats and encourage us to embrace it out of taqwa. They will quote their scholar(s) who proclaim it is Wajib to accept their position, but then trash opposing fatwas like yesterdays newspaper. Where is the taqwa in that?

The ironic thing is you will get these strict scholars quoting other contemporary 'Ulema to corroborate and strengthen their position, but the minute they differ with them in another masla', then takfir is made upon them. You can't win.

How many Muslims here can honestly say they had the urge to consume booze after drinking a can of Pepsi or any soft drink?

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#82 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd January 2020 17:15
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#83 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd January 2020 17:47
QUESTION

Salaam, will it be permissible to consume non-alcoholic drinks, like beer, wine etc? They do not intoxicate and contain minute amount if any alcohol at all.

ANSWER

In the Name of Allah, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful.

As-salāmu ‘alaykum wa-rahmatullāhi wa-barakātuh.

Non-alcoholic beer
Non-alcoholic beer starts out as regular alcoholic beer, thereafter the alcohol is removed from the beer.

Although numerous methods of production exist, most non-alcoholic beer is made by removing the alcohol from regular beer. This can be done in two ways:

1. It is boiled in order to evaporate the alcohol. This is possible because alcohol has a lower boiling point than water, making it easier to boil off. One method involves heating the beer, but this can significantly alter the flavor. When beer is heated, the alcohol in the beer starts to evaporate. To prevent the taste from changing, some breweries use vacuum distilling. This process uses a vacuum to lower alcohol's boiling point as much as possible. Instead of heating the beer to a hot temperature, the beer only reaches a fairly warm temperature. This technique helps to keep the flavors intact while reducing the alcohol content.

2. The second process is called reverse osmosis, and is the same method often used to purify drinking water. It doesn’t require any heating. The wine or beer is passed through a filter with pores so small that only alcohol and water (and a few volatile acids) can pass through. The alcohol is distilled out of the alcohol-water mix using conventional distillation methods, and the water and remaining acids are added back into the syrupy mixture of sugars and flavour compounds left on the other side of the filter. [1]

However, despite these two processes of removing the alcohol from the beer or wine, no amount of boiling or vacuum will ever completely remove all the alcohol, which is why even non-alcoholic beer will typically contain about 0.5% alcohol. One could attempt to remove the alcohol through distillation, but this would be a long and expensive process.

It should also be known that non-alcoholic beer often contains more alcohol than its label claims.

One study of 45 non-alcoholic beverages revealed that nearly 30% of them harbored more alcohol than stated. This same study found that 6 beers labelled 0.0% ABV (alcohol by volume) did contain alcohol at levels up to 1.8% ABV.[2]

Non-alcoholic beer is specifically marketed towards the Kuffaar and Fussaq who are accustomed to drinking normal beer. It has become a hallmark of the disbelievers and Fussaq. That is why non-alcoholic beer tastes the same as normal beer. This is further understood by the plethora of lite-beers available from all major alcohol manufacturing companies. Accordingly, one should refrain from all such non-alcoholic beers.

Non-alcoholic wine
The process of producing non-alcoholic wine is similar to that of non-alcoholic beer.It should be noted that intoxication itself is not the reason for the prohibition of wine. Rather it is due to clear prohibition found in the Ahadith:

عَنِ ابْنِ عَبَّاسٍ، قَالَ حُرِّمَتِ الْخَمْرُ بِعَيْنِهَا-(سنن النسائى-5684)

Translation: It was narrated that Ibn 'Abbas said:"Khamr was forbidden in and of itself-(Sunan Nasa’i-5684)

Therefore, wine and beer will remain impure and Haram irrespective of whether the alcohol is removed from it or not.

And Allah Ta’āla Knows Best
Mudassir Benish
Student Darul Iftaa
Houston, TX, U.S.A

Checked and Approved by, Mufti Ebrahim Desai.
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#84 [Permalink] Posted on 4th May 2020 06:14
tasbeeh, thanks for sharing that.
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#85 [Permalink] Posted on 7th October 2021 04:26
abu mohammed wrote:
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Salam bro, a few years after your post I know, but recently became intrigued about this.

I completely agree about the fact that these non-alcoholic beverage providers are generally alcohol producing companies looking to tap into another customer segmentation - namely the health conscious sober one, but for the purposes that they can fit in to a gathering of drinkers at social events and so forth.

Having said that, I did want to pick on a flaw in your calculation. Well not necessarily your calculation itself, but your conclusion. I just did a calculation, and from that, for a 0.05% non alcoholic beer or cider, you would need to drink more than 20 litres an hour to get drunk.

Calculation: One unit of alcohol per hour is cleared by liver (NHS and your post). If one 650ml beverage contains 0.0325 units, then you would need to drink more than 1/0.0325*650ml = 20000ml = 20 litres in an hour to get drunk, according to your calculation.

The problem with this calculation is that if you drink this amount, you would almost certainly be dead from water poisoning, so it's impossible to get drunk like this. Furthermore, most apples have a higher % of alcohol than this, so would you then say because eating 50 apples would get you theoretically drunk if you are not dead from cyanide poisoning, that then apples are haram as well?

So, say we are in a situation where someone wants to drink one of these non-alcoholic beverages, in a situation where say they do it in the comfort of their own home in a different container (avoiding the kuffar social misuse and the imitation of the bottle), would it then be considered permissible?

One opinion is that the reason it would be considered haram is that it originates from a fermented alcohol which is then filtrated to a low alcohol %, and since the original fermented ~95% alcohol would be considered impure, then the ~0.05% leftover alcohol would also be considered impure after filtration (by whatever means I suppose, would that even matter here?). What do you think about this argument?

A response would be much appreciated, jazakAllah khairan.
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#86 [Permalink] Posted on 7th October 2021 10:20
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JazakAllah for the reply. Yes, I agree that it would be difficult to get drunk in such a way. I also aknowledge the rulings of Imam Abu Hanifa on the topic of Alcohol and so on.

Regardless of the calculation and its flaws, I hope you have read my other posts and clips on the topic. Even if the Ulama declare it to be Halal on the basis of just the ingredients and quantity alone, I would still refrain from it, simply because of the imitation aspect of the Kuffar.

As I mentioned earlier, if the same drink was sold in a clear plastic/glass bottle, the response/attitude/approach would be completely different and many would drink it without a doubt or fear!

The fact that the drink is being sold like the intoxicating drink should be the ultimate NO to the drink.

Should you wish to prove it is Halal beyond doubt, I won't question you about it because I could do the same if I was so eager to drink a lookalike, smell-alike, taste-alike drink. I will stick with the hadith of imitation. There are plenty of other much more healthier drinks we can consume. So why this drink? There are 100% Halal alternatives which will also benefit the body and not cause harm from its artificial ingredients, sugars and so on.

For some, the principle is also essential :)
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#87 [Permalink] Posted on 8th October 2021 16:32
abu mohammed wrote:
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JazakAllah Khairan for the reply. Yeah, I agree, there are alternatives and also there is the ethical and moral consideration of giving money to haram alcohol making companies. And yeah, they come in almost identical bottles and that's because their target demographic are drinkers who want to give up drinking for health reasons, and want to make the experience feel similar without the negative effects of alcohol. My question was quite contrived in that the scenario was of a person who doesn't socialise with it or add to the 'drinking culture', but rather drinks because they like the taste, or something like that. It was actually a question posed to me by a non-muslim colleague at work, who offered it to me, and I wasn't sure so I left it.

From an islamic perspective, does the way something like this is made (it doesn't neccessarily have to be these non alcohol drinks) have an impact on it's halal status? E.g. something is haram, but then you reduce the thing that makes it haram to a negligible level, that's not necessarily changing it's properties is it (like vinegar, for e.g.). So even though the intoxicating element is reduced, would the product itself still be considered impure?
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#88 [Permalink] Posted on 8th October 2021 20:16
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That's a topic for the scholars to discuss.

Personally, these hadith would or should deter us.

The Prophet, (saw), said, “A man is upon the religion of his best friend, so let one of you look at whom he befriends.”
Sunan al-Tirmidhī 2378

Prophet (saw) said: “You will certainly follow the ways of those who came before you hand span by hand span, cubit by cubit, to the extent that if they entered the hole of a lizard, you will enter it too.” We said: “O Messenger of Allaah, (do you mean) the Jews and the Christians?” He said: “Who else?” Narrated by al-Bukhaari, 1397; Muslim, 4822. 

It was narrated that ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Umar said: The Prophet (saw) said: “Whoever imitates a people is one of them.” Narrated by Abu Dawood, 3512.
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