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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 13th April 2020 17:49
Edit: title changed from coronavirus and Ramadhan to lockdown and Ramadhan

Coronavirus during Ramadhan

Just because Mosques around the world are closed for mass gatherings, it doesn't mean we can't fast.

Why are people implying that Fasting must be cancelled? What is wrong with them?

What will be different this year?
Well that's simple, Taraweeh will be prayed at home. One can pray 20 rakaats on their own or they can do a jamaat with their family members present in the home. Huffaz will be able to complete the Quran during the night prayers and those who don't know the entire Quran, they can simply recite the verses or Surahs that they do know by heart.

Here is what the experts, science, and scholars have to say.

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Text of tweet reproduced below (minus the intro)

What health experts say?

According to recommendations by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and health experts, people are advised to drink plenty of fluids, particularly gargling with warm water and drinking liquids to keep their throat and respiratory tract moist.

Health experts say drinking water prevents dehydration, but it will not prevent anyone from catching the new coronavirus.

Doctors caution against believing homegrown advice and what social media users are spreading online as ways of preventing the virus. Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University, said while medical professionals typically recommend keeping up fluid intake when sick, drinking more water will not keep anyone from catching the virus.

"We always caution anyone healthy and people who are sick to keep up fluid intake and keep mucus membranes moist. It makes one feel better; but there is no clear indication that it directly protects against complications,” Dr. Schaffner confirmed.

What science says?
Recent scientific studies show that fasting is the secret to a healthier and longer life. According to a UK-based National Institute on Aging, evidence from decades of animal and human research shows wide-ranging health benefits of intermittent fasting.

The institute conducted a review of the research, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, which pointed that hundreds of animal studies and scores of human clinical trials have shown that intermittent fasting can lead to improvements in health conditions such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancers and neurological disorders.

The review said still more research is needed to determine whether intermittent fasting yields benefits or is even feasible for humans when practiced over the long term, such as for years.


In a Horizon Documentary titled “Eat, Fast and Live Longer”, Dr. Michael Mosley sets for himself a truly ambitious goal: he wants to live longer, stay younger and lose weight in the bargain. He discovers the powerful new science behind the ancient idea of fasting. Mosley tests out the science of fasting on himself – with life-changing results.

In his journey, he explores the secrets to good health and the secrets to longevity. He does not stop there but goes on to discover what is called, “intermittent fasting” –What is very interesting is that he discovers the effects of fasting on the aging of the brain. Although the trials were conducted on mice, they suggest that human beings have a good chance of reducing brain diseases by fasting intermittently.

What Islam and Muftis say?
Dr Ali Ahmad Masha’el, Grand Mufti at the Dubai Department of Islamic Affairs and Charitable Activities, said: “Fasting is the fourth pillar of Islam, and nothing can excuse one from not fasting except for ailing people who are on medication and fasting may complicate their health condition.

He said there are legitimate reasons for which one may be excused from fasting as mentioned in the holy Quran, which are sickness and travelling. “O you who believe! Fasting is prescribed for you as it was prescribed for those before you, that possibly you would be pious,” [Al Baqarah 2: 183]. “Fasting for a limited number of days. So, whoever among you is ill or on a journey - then an equal number of days [are to be made up]-And upon those who are able [to fast, but with hardship] - a ransom [as substitute] of feeding a poor person [each day]. And whoever volunteers excess - it is better for him-But to fast is best for you, if you only knew” [Al Baqarah: 2:184].

Dr. Masha’el said: “Nothing can be preferred over the pillars of Islam, including fasting, which is a duty by every Muslim. A fear of getting sick is not an excuse for a Muslim to not fast. Islam permits sick people, whose health condition makes them unable to fast, and are advised by their [Muslim] doctors, who know the virtues of fasting, not to fast because it may risk their lives.”

Islam permits sick people - if fasting can risk their lives or cause harm to their health - not to fast. “The sick person, who fears that fasting may make his sickness worse or slow down his recovery or damage a part of his body, upon his doctor’s opinion, has the option of not fasting, “ the Mufti said.

He said: “If the sick person is very ill, it is permissible for him not to fast. But if a healthy person fears difficulty and tiredness or afraid of getting sick it is not permissible for him to break his fast.”

The grand mufti said fasting is a reflection and purification of both body and soul. Fasting is also good for human health, as it has been proven by modern medicine and scientific studies. “Fasting was found to have beneficial effects on health, backed by recent scientific studies,” he emphasised.

Regarding COVID-19 infected patients, Dr. Masha’el said: “It is permissible not to fast if the health condition of a coronavirus-infected patient is critical and is advised by his doctor not to fast because he/or she needs to keep drinking water and taking medicine.”

What Al Azhar Al Sharif says?
Al Azhar Al Sharif, the Muslim world’s top Sunni Islamic institution issued a statement that Muslims are required to fast this year, and fasting has nothing to do with the possibility of an increased risk of catching coronavirus.

“Not fasting during Ramadan is not permissible due to coronavirus, and fasting is a duty and a must for Muslims,” Al Azhar said in a statement.

Al Azhar’s Fatwa is based on the feedback they received from the World Health Organisation, which says that drinking and gargling with water does not protect a person from catching COVID-19 virus.

“We have asked WHO if drinking water or gargling with water would protect people from being infected with coronavirus. The answer was: Although water is important for the moisture of human body, it does not protect against the virus and has not been proven that gargling with water can protect anyone from catching the virus.”
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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 18th April 2020 12:37
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#3 [Permalink] Posted on 18th April 2020 13:49
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#4 [Permalink] Posted on 19th April 2020 12:36
Dr Mufti Abdur Rahman ibn Yusuf Mangera

youtu.be/RXKhcV63wDA

Virtual Taraweeh and Jummah prayers in light of the Hanafi school.
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#5 [Permalink] Posted on 21st April 2020 10:52
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#6 [Permalink] Posted on 21st April 2020 11:04
I am wondering how Eid al fitr will be collected til now it’s been the local masjids who have been accepting it. Will have to check online options.
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#7 [Permalink] Posted on 21st April 2020 11:24
Moonlight wrote:
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The money can be given anytime before the Salah, so people have the whole month to make arrangements. Many people are mistaken that it can only be given on the day of Eid before the Eid Salah. This in itself is contrary to the reason the money is actually given. In fact, that is a bit late and defeats the purpose

Many Masjids are open for small jamaats and Jummah Salah. The money can be given at that time or alternatively for people with access to the Internet and or online banking can do it this way.
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#8 [Permalink] Posted on 21st April 2020 11:36
abu mohammed wrote:
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Yes online will have to be an option for most. Can you post some info relating to eid al fitr and when it can be given. You are right most including myself have always been under the impression that it has to be discharged on the day.
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#10 [Permalink] Posted on 21st April 2020 12:46
If possible, It can be sent to sub-continent online. On first ramadhan itself.

A single person can collect everything and transfer it to his relatives back home and they can spend it here.
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#11 [Permalink] Posted on 26th April 2020 19:19
Africa adapts to new taste of Ramadan under Covid-19 lockdown


Muslims pray in Cape Town before looking for the crescent moon that signals the start of Ramadan © AFP Rodger Bosch

The coronavirus pandemic has changed the flavour of this year's Ramadan in Africa, home to a third of the world's Muslim population. Between strict confinement, curfews and a ban on any public gatherings, the fasting month will be unlike most other years.

There is less hum and buzz this year in African markets that usually sell ingredients such as meat, vegetable, and sweets for the fast-breaking meal known as iftar – a centrepiece of the holy month of Ramadan.

Egypt loosens restrictions
Around the souks and streets of Egypt's capital Cairo, a sprawling city of 23 million, the coronavirus has scared the usual throng of customers away.

A night curfew has also made it difficult to shop. The restrictions on Ramadan have already begun to take their toll on Egyptians, dozens of whom marched in the coastal city of Alexandria on Thursday night for the start of the holy month in defiance of a ban on public gatherings.

The government of Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has since loosened some of its restrictions, pushing the start of the night-time curfew back an hour to 9pm.

Shopping malls and businesses will be also allowed to open on weekends, but still be required to close at 5pm.

Egypt has reported 4,319 cases of the coronavirus including 307 deaths. Authorities hav said they are ready to re-impose curbs if infections begin to exceed predictions.

Niger riots
Stay at home orders have also been difficult to enforce in Niger, where riots have broken out in several towns over anti-coronavirus lockdowns banning collective prayers.

More than 300 people have been arrested in the run-up to Ramadan in the impoverished former French colony, with rioters torching cars and buildings and setting up roadblocks.

Despite a relatively low Covid-19 toll in the country – officially 27 deaths from 684 cases – the government has imposed a state of emergency and a curfew and shut down mosques as well as schools.

Last week, authorities announced an easing of the curfew in Niamey, saying it would now be in effect from 9pm until 5am instead 7pm - 6am.

Nigeria's challenge
In neighbouring Nigeria, fifteen imams were arrested after holding Friday prayers in defiance of a government ban.

In a statement, President Muhammadu Buhari acknowledged the challenge of this year's Ramadan for Muslims in the country and around the world but urged them to refrain from Ramadan rituals and traditions.

The holiest month in the Islamic calendar is usually one of family and togetherness, but Buhari said Muslims should "have their prayers and meals individually or with family at home".

Nigerian authorities have nonetheless loosened some restrictions. Residents in the northern town of Kano were able to shop for food from 6am until midnight on Thursday, the day before the start of the holy month. Mosques, however, remain closed.

Africa's most populous country has registered 1,182 cases of the respiratory disease and 35 deaths. Critics say the relatively low case count for a country of 200 million is not due to luck or efficiency but because of the slow pace of Nigeria's tests.

South African charity
Muslims in South Africa are also adjusting to a different Ramadan experience without congregational prayers and feasting with communities during fast-breaking at sunset.

But the holy month is not just about fasting, charity is also obligatory.

South African leader Cyril Ramaphosa said he hoped Muslims would continue performing charitable acts in the spirit of Ramadan at a time when millions face hunger, destitution and misery.

Eighty-six people have died from Covid-19 in South Africa out of 4,361 confirmed cases.

“As Africans, we will emerge from this hardship with a new consciousness," Ramaphosa said in a video posted on the African Union website, where he sits as chairperson.

"We will understand, and perhaps as never before, our great duty to help and support those less fortunate than ourselves will be enhanced,” he added.

Senegal's high food prices
In Senegal, where 614 coronavirus cases and seven deaths have been reported, the plan is to continue charity in a limited way.

In the capital Dakar, charities that characteristically hand out “Ndogou”, baguettes slathered with chocolate spread, cakes and dates to those in need, have decided to distribute them to Koranic schools rather than on the street to respect social distancing rules.

The coronavirus lockdown is also having an impact on businesses.

Seated at her makeshift stall of carrots and turnips, Dakar street trader Awa Sow says the pandemic has dampened the festivities.

"Usually, this is the busiest time of the year, but right now, we have to close early, people are confined and they don't have money," she told RFI.

Rising food costs have also put a strain on people's pockets.

"Normally, one smoked fish costs 500 CFA francs, it's now gone up to 1,300!" says Sow. "But, God is the one who decides."
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#12 [Permalink] Posted on 12th May 2020 14:43
youtu.be/cmQA5u_ux_8

Mufti Abdur Rahman ibn Yusuf Mangera on Eid Salah at home.

Can Eid Salah be performed at home knowing that the minimum requirement for Jamaat is 4 mature male participants?
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#13 [Permalink] Posted on 16th May 2020 00:59
Can Eid Salat Be Performed at Home due to COVID-19 Lockdown?
Question:
Due to the current COVID-19 lockdown situation, would it be permitted to perform Eid prayers in congregation or individually at home? I follow the Hanafi School, so would like an answer based on it please. I have friends who follow the Shafi’i School, so if you could provide a shafi’i ruling too, it will be appreciated.

Answer:
In the name of Allah, Most Compassionate, Most Merciful,

According to the Maliki, Shafi’i and Hanbali Schools of Sunni Islamic law, it is permissible, even in regular circumstances, for the one who misses the Eid Salat at the mosque or musalla to perform it at home, either individually or in congregation – though some Maliki jurists are of the opinion that it must be performed individually. There is no requirement, however, to have the sermon (khutba) delivered. (See for the Maliki School: Mawahib al-Jalil li sharh Mukhtasar al-Khalil 2/581, for the Shafi’i School: Rawdat al-Talibin 1/578, and for the Hanbali School: Al-Mughni 3/284)

Imam Nawawi (may Allah have mercy on him), the great Shafi’i jurist, states, “Two views have been transmitted [in the Shafi’i School] on whether the Eid prayer is legislated for a slave, traveller, woman and a person praying alone at home or elsewhere. The reliable and more renowned position is that it is legislated for them.” (Al-Majmu’ sharh al-Muhaddhab 5/32)

As such, it is permitted for those following the above schools of Islamic law to perform the Eid prayer at home due to the current lockdown and the various mosques/masajid remaining closed for the general public. There are, however, differences in some peripheral details between these schools, hence one should learn the rules prior to performing the Eid prayer.

The Hanafi School
According to the Hanafi School of Sunni Islamic law, Eid prayer is treated the same as the Friday/Jumu’a prayer and, as such, all the conditions of the latter apply to the former – with the exception of the sermon (khutba).

Imam Kasani (may Allah have mercy on him), the great classical Hanafi jurist, states, “In terms of the conditions for the obligation (wujub) and validity (jawaz) of the Eid prayer, all the conditions required for the obligation and validity of the Jumu’a prayer are also required for the Eid prayer. These include: the presence of the ruler [in Muslim countries], it being a city or town, congregation and the time [of Zuhr]. The only exception is the sermon (khutba), since it is a Sunna after the prayer. Thus, the Eid prayer will be valid if the khutba is omitted. (Bada’i al-Sana’i 2/237)

Likewise, Imam Fakhr al-Din Qadhikhan states, “The prerequisites required for the [validity of] Eid prayer are the same prerequisites of the Jumu’a prayer, such as the place being a city or town, permission from the Muslim ruler (sultan) [in Muslim countries] and general permission/public access (idhn aam)…” (Fatawa Qadhikhan 1/162)

Basis of the Hanafi Position
The Hanafi School’s position is based on the fact that both the Jumu’a and Eid prayers have been mentioned together as important and formal communal prayers, where things like it taking place in a city or large town is a prerequisite – as per some narrations (athar).

Sayyiduna Ali (may Allah be pleased with him) said, “The Jumu’a, Eid al-Fitr and Eid al-Adha prayers are not valid except in a city or large town.” (Musannafs of Abd al-Razzaq and Ibn Abi Shayba; similar statements are related from some other companions and their students which can been found in the Musannaf of Imam Ibn Abi Shayba 2/536)

Moreover, the Jumu’a and Eid prayers have been continually, since the first generation of Muslims (al-sadr al-awwal), performed in cities/large towns and in congregation. (Kasani, Bada’i al-Sana’i 2/237)

Accordingly, in the Hanafi School, there is no makeup (qada) for the Eid prayer if one missed it at the mosque or musalla. Imam Haskafi (may Allah have mercy on him) states, “One will not perform the Eid prayer alone if one misses performing it with the imam [at the mosque or musalla], even if one invalidates it after commencement.” (Al-Durr al-Mukhtar 3/58)

Imam Kasani (may Allah have mercy on him) explains in his Al-Bada’i al-Sana’i that if one misses performing the Eid prayer with the imam, then according to Imam Shafi’i (may Allah have mercy on him), one may make up for it alone with the additional takbirat of Eid. However, according to us [the Hanafis] there is no makeup (qada). The reason is that, as with the Friday/Jumu’a prayer, the specific and unique manner of performing this prayer is known only through the action of Allah’s Messenger (peace and blessings be upon him) – and he never performed it except with a congregation, like the Jumu’a prayer. As such, it is necessary to perform the Eid prayer in a manner that the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) performed it. Secondly, the Eid prayer has specific characteristics and prerequisites that are difficult to fulfil when making up for it. As such, there is no makeup (qada) for Eid prayer, just as there is no makeup for the Jumu’a prayer [rather one will perform Zuhr instead]. (Bada’ al-Sana’i 2/249)

Incidentally, Imam Ibn Taymiya (Allah have mercy on him) holds the same position as that of the Hanafi School. (See: Majmu’a al-Fatawa 17/258)

The condition of congregation
After having established that the conditions for the validity of the Jumu’a prayer apply also to the Eid prayer in the Hanafi School, two conditions – of the several stipulated – are of importance in light of the current COVID-19 lockdown. The first is the condition of performing the prayer as part of a congregation. All the classical Hanafi jurists (fuqaha) are in agreement that the Jumu’a and Eid prayers can only be performed in congregation. As for the number, the relied upon position within the school is that there must be four people including the Imam. (Bada’i al-Sana’i 2/210)

Incidentally, according to Imam Shafi’i (may Allah have mercy on him), there must be 41 people including the imam for the Jumu’a prayer, yet a person can perform the Eid prayer alone. An ill-disciplined mixing of two favourable opinions would be to follow the Hanafi School for Jumua’, and the Shafi’i school for Eid!

The condition of public access
A second, and somewhat controversial, condition within the Hanafi School in relation to the Jumu’a prayer – and by extension the Eid prayer – is that general permission and access (idhn aam) is granted for Muslims to join the prayer. Imam Kasani (may Allah have mercy on him) mentions that this condition is implied through the verse of the Quran, “O you who believe, when the call for prayer is proclaimed on Friday, hasten to the remembrance of Allah, and leave trade.” (62:9) He explains that Allah Most High prescribed “proclaiming/calling out” for the Jumu’a prayer, and this “calling out” is for publicising, so that everyone – without exception – is granted permission to attend the prayer. (Bada’i al-Sana’i 2/213)

Various explanations have been offered in relation to this condition. After thoroughly analysing the various texts of classical Hanafi jurists on the matter – such as Radd al-Muhtar, Bada’i al-Sana’i, Fath al-Qadir, Majma’ al-Anhur and Maraqi al-Falah – my respected teacher, Shaykh Mufti Muhammad Taqi Usmani (may Allah protect him), concludes that the condition of general permission/public access (idhn aam) is still applicable (even in non-Muslim countries) in relation to private homes, shops and stores. Jumu’a prayer will not be valid in such places unless the public is given access to attend. This is the case, even if it is being performed in other areas of the city. However, large places within the city, consisting of many people – such as prisons, military bases, big airports and big factories – are exempted. Jumu’a is permitted in such places, even if permission is not granted to the general public due to security and administrative reasons, provided all those inside are not prevented from attending. (See: Fatawa Usmani 1/523)

This position was also taken by him in a recent concise answer posted on this website, the contents of which were read, checked and approved by him. Please see: ‘COVID-19: Ruling on Jumu’a and Eid Prayers in Non-Muslim Countries due to Lockdown’

As such, in view of the current lockdown, Muslims residing in non-Muslim countries may perform the Eid prayer in places like a compound or hall, where people are not refused from attending. If this is not possible or the law does not allow it, then Eid Salat will not be performed at home. However, one may perform four rak’at supererogatory (nafl) prayers at home individually – similar to the mid-morning prayer (salat al-duha), i.e. without any extra takbirat. This was related from the Companion Sayyiduna Abdullah ibn Mas’ud (may Allah be pleased with him). It is not a necessary prayer, but rather, recommended and a good way of earning reward and expressing thankfulness to Allah Most High for granting one the ability to fast and worship during Ramadan. (Radd al-Muhtar 2/175 and Bada’i al-Sana’i 2/249)

Having said the above, certain contemporary Hanafi scholars interpret the condition of “public access” in a somewhat different manner. According to their view, it is permitted to perform the Eid prayer in private homes but as part of a congregation. As such, if one wishes, one may follow their position.

Conclusion
In conclusion, in light of the current COVID-19 lockdown, those who follow the Shafi’i, Maliki and Hanbali Schools of Sunni Islamic law may perform the Eid prayer at home, even individually according to some schools. However, there is no requirement for the khutba.

As for those who follow the Hanafi School, the position taken by Shaykh Mufti Muhammad Taqi Usmani and many other scholars, and the position which I follow, is that the Eid prayer will not be performed in private homes where there is no public access. Rather, one may offer four rak’at supererogatory (nafl/duha) prayers. However, there is scope in taking the position of some other Hanafi scholars who opine that the Eid prayer can be performed at home, but in a minimum congregation of four people.

And Allah knows best

[Mufti] Muhammad ibn Adam
Darul Iftaa
Leicester, UK

I concur with this answer
[Mufti] Abdur-Rahman ibn Yusuf
WhiteThread Institute, UK
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#14 [Permalink] Posted on 16th May 2020 01:35
Can Eid prayer be performed at home?

Very quick reply from Shaykh Aasim Al Hakim

youtu.be/sHpGAxLw3cw

Shaykh Aasim al-Hakim makes mention of the 3 schools of thoughts and their opinions, then concludes with the Hanafi Madhab and the view of Shaykh ibn Taymiyyah and says that is the strongest view.
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#15 [Permalink] Posted on 16th May 2020 03:47
Answered by Shaykh Salman Younas

Question: Assalam aleykum

Given the current situation with COVID-19 and the closures/restrictions on mosques and public gatherings, is it permitted to perform the ʿĪd prayer at home individually or in congregation?

Answer: assalamu alaykum

There is a difference of opinion between the various schools on this issue. Given the current situation, people are permitted and encouraged to perform the ʿĪd prayer at home.

The Ḥanafī School

According to the Ḥanafī school, the ʿĪd prayer is not performed at home by individuals. Rather, it is a communal event similar to the Friday prayer that needs to fulfil the same conditions as the latter including being performed in congregation, with the community and its designated imam(s), and in a publicly accessible area. (al-Kāsānī, Badāʿi al-ṣanā’iʿ, 1:275; Ṣadr al-Sharīʿa, Sharḥ al-wiqāya, 1:183; Ibn al-Humām, Fatḥ al-qadīr, 2:29)

Three further questions arise following this relevant to the current situation:

(a) If one is unable to perform the ʿĪd prayer, or misses its performance with the community, should he perform another prayer? All major texts of the school state that it is recommended in this case to perform a normal supererogatory prayer instead at home, which may be two or four cycles and can count as ṣalāt al-ḍuḥā.

(b) Can this prayer be performed in congregation? The general rule in the Ḥanafī school is that it is neither recommended nor a sunna to perform supererogatory prayers in congregation and it may actually be disliked. However, some jurists mention that it would be permitted without dislikedness to perform supererogatory prayers in congregation if it is (i) done only on the rare occasion and (ii) in small congregations not involving openly inviting large numbers of people to the prayer. (Ibn ʿĀbidīn, Radd al-muḥtār, 2:500-01; Ḥanafīs usually define the second condition as a congregation of less than four individuals, but the applicability of this to a very limited and restrictive household setting performing a one-off prayer is arguable).

(c) Is there any difference of opinion in the Ḥanafī school on the ruling of performing ʿĪd at home? Yes, there are scholars in the school who interpret the conditions for the ʿĪd prayer in a manner that would permit the performance of this prayer at home with a minimum congregation of four people. This is not my preferred reading of the school.

Other Schools

The Shafiʿī school permits ʿĪd prayer at home – whether individually or as part of a congregation – because they deem the ʿĪd prayer as similar to any other supererogatory prayer. It is performed as two cycles with twelve extra takbīrāt – seven in the first cycle immediately after the opening supplication (istiftāḥ) and five upon rising for the second cycle before the taʿawwudh. (al-Nawawī, Rawdat al-ṭālibīn, 1:578).

The Mālikī and Ḥanbalī schools also have mainstream and relied-upon views permitting ʿĪd at home. For details, one should consult scholars from these schools.

COVID-19, ʿĪd Prayer, & Festivities

In light of the difference of opinion on the issue, the unprecedented situation Muslim are facing, and the need for many to maintain the performance of ʿĪd and make it a day of joyous celebration, gratitude to Allah, and worship for one’s family, individuals are permitted and in fact encouraged to perform ʿĪd prayers at home – whether individually or in congregation with their families.

If someone chooses to follow the stronger Ḥanafī view that ʿĪd is not permitted in the home, they may perform a normal supererogatory prayer with their family, i.e. even as a congregation, but they should not add any extra takbīrāt. This would be permitted as it is a rare and one-off occurrence with the limited members of one’s household.

It is also recommended for people to continue honouring this day by taking a bath, wearing one’s best clothing, applying fragrances, maintaining familial ties, and, importantly, making efforts to make the day memorable for children by partaking in things that elicit happiness and jubilation. As the Prophet (blessings upon him) said, “Every nation has its day of celebration, and this is our day of celebration.” (al-Bukhārī) The reality of this day as one of celebration where we express thankfulness to Allah remains even if we are unable to proceed with ʿĪd in the manner normally done in the past.

And Allah alone knows best

[Shaykh] Salman Younas

May 11th, 2020
17th Ramadan, 1441

Checked and approved by Shaykh Faraz Rabbani

seekersguidance.org/answers/hanafi-fiqh/performing-eid-pr...
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