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#31 [Permalink] Posted on 9th March 2014 20:48
Beware The 'Caller-ID' Scam

Mar 5, 2014

Shutterstock / Ambient Creations
Ofcom has issued a warning about 'number spoofing scams', which are spreading across the UK. The criminals cold-call their victims, pretending to be from their bank and asking for personal details. If the victim questions the legitimacy of the call, the scammer tells them to check their caller ID - at which point they see their bank's genuine number.

However, this is just a new twist on the telephone scam.
The scam
The criminals have modified their caller ID to match that of a legitimate bank. The technology allows experts to do this, if, for example they want to leave an 0800 number for you to call back. However, the criminal gangs are using it to their advantage.

Once they have changed the caller ID, they pose as the representative of a bank, credit card company or government department. They'll give a convincing-sounding story and then ask for account numbers and other sensitive information.

At some stage during the call, if the victim suggests something unusual is going on, they will highlight the caller ID number, to 'prove' they are legitimate. They will encourage the victim to check the caller ID number against the one on their bank card or statement - and when it matches some will be reassured enough to hand over highly sensitive details.

Protect yourself
Ofcom is warning people not to believe the scam. They say if anyone asks for your personal details you should assume that you are being scammed, and hang up.

You should then wait for at least five minutes and call back using the number on your statement, in the phone book, or on the official website. The reason for leaving it at least five minutes is so you can be sure the line has cleared and you're not still speaking to the same fraudster. Ideally if you have another line or a mobile phone you should use that - to be on the safe side.

You can then be sure you are speaking to someone legitimate, and ask them whether the original contact was from them, or whether you have been the victim of an attempted fraud.

If you think you have been a victim of the scam, if debit cards, online banking or cheques are involved in the scam you should immediately contact your bank or credit card company. Your next step should be to report it to Action Fraud on 0300 123 2040 or visit www.actionfraud.police.uk. You should also report it on the police non-emergency line: 101.
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#32 [Permalink] Posted on 27th March 2014 11:19
Charity donation fraud

Charity donation fraud is when fake charities play on your sympathy by asking you to make a donation to a worthy cause.

Charity donation frauds ask you to make a donation to a group of people or a particular cause. In many cases, the donation request is linked to a high-profile event, such as an earthquake.

Either the charity that the fraudster has asked you to donate to doesn't exist, or they are misusing the name of a genuine, often well-known, charity and pocketing your money.

If you donate through a website, the fraudsters may record your credit or bank account details and use them to make purchases through your account.

If you're asked to call a phone number, it could be a premium rate number. This means the fraudsters will pocket even more of your money on top of your donation.

If you're asked to donate clothing or household items, the fraudsters will sell them on and keep the money rather than giving them to people in need.

Protect yourself against charity donation fraud

Genuine charities and fraudsters often use the same methods to ask for donations. So, you need to be sure that a fraud has actually taken place. Here are some signs to look for:

genuine charities are registered with the Charity Commission and print their registration details on all documentation, collection bags, envelopes etc. Check these details exist and also contact the Charity Commission to confirm they are authentic. You can call them on their helpline 0845 300 0218 or by visiting charity-commission.gov.uk, where they have an online charity register

as well as identity documents, people collecting money for a genuine charity must carry documents from the charity confirming they are collecting legitimately. Ask to see these documents and check the details

if the collection is for a charity you know is genuine, check the collection is authorised by asking the charity directly, using contact details from the phone book or a website that you know is genuine

contact your local authority or police station to check whether the collector has been given a licence to collect

watch out for poor grammar and spelling in emails and other documents, including collection envelopes

send your donation to the charity directly. This may mean going to a little more trouble, but at least you can be sure your donation will get to where it's intended.
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#33 [Permalink] Posted on 27th March 2014 17:14

Polygamy: Syrian women Available

Warning: This is a SCAM and the mobile numbers are Premium rate!


 

Announcement of the Syrian Polygamy Marriage Service - Inquire now!

Assalamu'alaikum,

Its Sister Fatima the main administrator for the service .
As promised that we would be setting up a
service to help widowed, divorced Syrian women under the arrangement of
'polygamy', alhumdulliah, we are now in a position to offer the service
from women in the Turkish refugee camps near the borders of Syria.

This is a serious service for serious people, who wish to fufil the sunnah
in a complete sense hence you will be vetted and interviewed and to cover
basic administrative fee [time and cost of going to camps, seeing the women,
agreement with them and families, and regular monitoring/checks and updates].

Many of these women are traumatized war victims, hence you need to be clear,
in your mind you have no issues with raped, widowed, divorced Syrian women
and there some of them are Shaykha's/Alimahs and Hafiza's who can teach
religion, who are willing to be co-wives, subject to various conditions.

If you interested in finding out more, or just ready to start the process,
please call/email:

Call FAHIM
Tel: 07907 030 389
Email: onefulan@gmail.com

Unless the brothers come forward and man up, this glorious Prophetic Sunnah
can never be established and take hold in our communities and reclaim the
idea from the deviants and ignorant.

Please tell all brothers who are serious!

For more information please contact:

Sister Fatima on 07092 032 136
Email: halalwives@gmail.com

Walasalam

Admin, HalalWives - Reclaiming & Reviving the Sunnah!

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#34 [Permalink] Posted on 27th March 2014 17:28
Muadh_Khan wrote:
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This text has/is been forwarded on all means of social media like crazy.

جزاك الله خيرا
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#35 [Permalink] Posted on 31st March 2014 22:27
Microsoft scam man is sentenced in 'landmark' case


Trading Standards hailed the case as being the first victory of its kind


A man who ran a Microsoft computer scam tricking people into paying for free anti-virus software has received a suspended four-month jail sentence.

Mohammed Khalid Jamil, 34, from Luton, hired people at an Indian call centre to falsely tell victims their computers had a serious problem.

The targets would be charged between 35 and 150 for software Microsoft made available for free.

As well as the suspended sentence, Jamil was ordered to pay a 5,000 fine.

He must also pay 5,665 compensation and 13,929 in prosecution costs.

The decision has been hailed as a "landmark" case by Trading Standards.

"We believe it may be the first ever successful prosecution of someone involved in the Microsoft scam in the UK," said Lord Harris, chairman of the National Trading Standards Board, which oversees the work of the National Trading Standards e-crime team.

"It's an important turning point for UK consumers who have been plagued by this scam, or variants of it, for several years.

"Many have succumbed to it, parting with significant sums of money, their computers have been compromised and their personal details have been put at risk.

"Now that one of the many individuals who've been operating this scam has been brought to justice, it's a stark warning to anyone else still doing it that they can be caught and will be prosecuted."

Remote access

Jamil had set up Luton-based company Smart Support Guys, which employed people based in India to cold-call Britons and claim to be working for Microsoft.

The victims, unaware of the scam, would offer remote access to the fraudsters - meaning their computers could be controlled from a different location.

Once given this access, targets' computers would be made less secure, at which point the scammers would offer, in return for a fee, to install software to fix the problem.

The software installed was available for free on Microsoft's website.

In court, Jamil admitted to unfair trading by allowing his staff to make false claims regarding computer support services.

He claimed he had tried but failed to control call centre staff and not adequately supervised them.

His jail term is suspended for 12 months.

m.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-26818745
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#36 [Permalink] Posted on 1st April 2014 01:12
Guest-35269 wrote:
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And I suspect that some brothers will receive a unpleasant surprise when thier phone bill arrives.
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#37 [Permalink] Posted on 25th April 2014 16:32
The 'old school' used car scam making a comeback



You would be forgiven for thinking that in a technological age, some used car scams would be a thing of the past. You might have assumed that car 'clocking' would be about as successful as gluing a GTI badge to the back of a standard model and hoping that no-one notices.

But you'd be wrong - because 'clocking' is making a comeback.

The scam
'Clocking' is the trade term for adjusting the mileage on a car's odometer, to make it look as if the car has driven fewer miles than it really has - in order to boost the asking price. Winding back just 1,000 miles on a car can add an estimated 100-400 to its value.

Shane Teskey, Senior Consumer Services Manager for www.hpicheck.com, says: "Clocking is one of the easiest ways they can make a fatter profit. In fact, research we conducted with CAP found that popular models such the VW Golf can double in value if they have 60,000 miles wound down."

The comeback
The practice seemed to be dying out, and the number of cars on the road with a mileage discrepancy was falling. The experts credited technological advancements with making it harder: you couldn't just remove the mechanical odometer and wind the clock back with a screwdriver any more.

However, vehicle history experts at hpicheck.com warn that last year there was a 3% rise in the number of cars on the road with a mileage discrepancy. Based the SMMT's used car sales figures for 2013, HPI estimates there could be as many as 486,000 vehicles with a false mileage on the road in the UK.

The problem is that the criminals have caught up with the technology. Now they can use diagnostic mileage correction software to turn back the digital odometer. There are a growing number of so-called 'mileage correction firms' that will alter a vehicle's mileage - with no questions asked - using this technology.

To make matters worse, these new techniques are much harder to detect - because they don't leave the physical signs you would get after someone had rewound the clock with a screwdriver.

Protect yourself
Yet there is a way to check the mileage when you're buying a car - by checking the National Mileage Register. This is standard on most of the checks offered by the likes of HPI and the RAC. The Mileage Register isn't guaranteed to be complete, because sending details to the firm isn't compulsory, but it could help flag up major discrepancies.

Teskey says: "This is one of the oldest cons in the book, simply because it is so easy to do and is so profitable, but by the same token it is easy for consumer to be vigilant and conduct a history check. If they do so we can stop dodgy sellers making a fast profit duping buyers."

Source
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#38 [Permalink] Posted on 12th May 2014 20:30
UK Motorists Warned of Accident Scams

Comfort Insurance, a motorhome insurer, warns drivers about an accident insurance scam named 'smash for cash'.

The scam involves fraudsters deliberately causing accidents to make as much money as possible. They cause accidents by slamming on their brakes for no obvious reason which causes the driver behind to crash into the car. Money is made by making false personal injury claims such as whiplash, loss of earnings or submitting fake bills for replacement car hire, vehicle storage, repairs or recovery.

According to Aviva it is becoming one of the most common types of fraud in the UK and that motor injury fraud now accounts for 54 percent of their total detected claims fraud cost. Over half are from smash for cash claims.

'Flash for cash' is another more recent variation of the scam where the fraudster will flash their headlights, offering their victim a right of way - but then speed up and crash into the side of the vehicle.

Ben Cue, Comfort Insurance's Head of Operations says, "At Comfort Insurance we have had a number of smash for cash cases which have resulted in our customer's premiums increasing because they are almost impossible to prove. But it's not only the cost; it's the time, effort and stress for the victims. Therefore we really do advise that drivers do their best to be vigilant on the roads to try and protect themselves."

Cue recommends having a camera to protect drivers from these claims and protect no claims bonuses. Camera systems in vehicles can store a continuous stream of high quality video which captures sound, the time and date, speed and factors such as impact, acceleration and braking.

"A camera can be installed to the windscreen, but another can be added to the same system to monitor the side or behind the vehicle," said Cue.

Cue advises taking photos of any accident.

"Take photos of the damage and also photos of the people involved, as scammers will often add on more people when they are claiming for injuries," he said.
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#39 [Permalink] Posted on 12th August 2014 21:15
Tourist Scams to Avoid...

Here are some of the most common tourist scams around the world.

Street crime

Common street scammers include those pretending to offer a free product or service, such as a rose for your partner or offering to take a photograph for you, but then aggressively demanding payment afterwards. In worse cases, these "voluntary" photographers will run off with your camera.

Others may be less obvious, such as taxi drivers who offer drugs to a group of tourists on their way to a party. But once the drugs are accepted, fake police appear demanding that a large sum of money be paid to avoid arrest.

Many scams involve some form of distraction, such as a person performing a magic show, which is said to be the most common street scam in London. The performer’s accomplice pickpockets the tourist while they are focused on the street show.

Other distraction schemes include a woman throwing a "baby" (usually just a doll) into your arms. While tourists hold the baby, shocked by the random act, her accomplice will have a poke around your bag and pockets.

Last year, Telegraph Travel reported on the growing problem of pickpockets in Paris, where cash-carrying Chinese and Russian tourists at the Louvre were said to have been targeted by increasingly aggressive thieves, many of them children.

Travel and transport

Taxi drivers overcharging tourists by deliberately taking longer routes are common across the world, but travellers were warned to beware of some taxi drivers (as well as waiters and shop keepers) in Asia who "accidentally" drop your change on the floor and then hand you similar looking, but less valuable coins or notes. In Las Vegas you might run into "getaway drivers" who remove all of your bags from the car boot for you, minus one small bag, and drive off quickly before you could realise it’s missing.

The luggage compartments on some of the cheap overnight charter buses in Thailand are said to be rummaged through by workers looking to steal any valuables. Last year, thieves in Spain took this a step further with the "Trojan Horse" scam, where contortionists infiltrated bus cargo holds by hiding inside a large luggage bag, which was loaded into the hold by an accomplice, in order to steal possessions being transported between popular tourist destinations.

Shops and fake services

Beware of till workers in Barcelona who appear to be on their phone while helping you, as they may actually be taking a photograph of your credit card details to be replicated later. Others across Europe will count through your change at a painfully slow pace, hoping you’ll just get frustrated and ask for the change back swiftly without knowing the wrong amount has been given out.

Official-looking men dressed as policemen in Mexico City, Bogota, Bucharest and Bangkok, were commonly found to check tourists’ wallets, claiming they were looking for fake money that had been circulating in the area. The wallets are then returned with money missing. Fake ticket issuers for different venues were most common in Paris and London.

Helpful or helpless locals

Overly eager and helpful locals across Europe have more than a friendly gesture on their agendas. An English-speaking local who walks you through how to work the local cash machine may in fact be memorising your pin number to use later after you’ve been pickpocketed.

Other seemingly caring European locals will say they’ve just witnessed a pickpocketing incident and warn you to check that your wallet and phone aren’t missing but note where it is for an attempt at stealing it later on. Scammers may also be lurking near beggars to watch where tourists keep their wallets as they reach for them to offer money to the homeless.

Innocent-looking children in Paris working for a charity petition will rummage through your bag, with their hands hidden beneath the clipboard while you look over the petition on it, while other children will pretend to be lost and ask for help in writing a letter or postcard home and guilt-trip tourists into giving them money.

Hotels

Some hotels across Europe were said to work with taxi drivers in order to convince tourists the hotel they have booked is actually in refurbishment. The driver then takes passengers to a different, more overpriced hotel. Other disreputable hotels copy the names of more popular hotels to convince holidaymakers they have arrived at the correct venue when they haven’t.

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) issued a warning to the public last year about the risk of holiday booking fraud, following a study that showed around 1,000 holiday scams were uncovered, costing tourists £1.5 million.

“The safest way to book accommodation is through a tour operator as part of a package holiday, as the operator has to take responsibility for the booking and guarantee that you won't lose money. By contrast, many villa rental websites are simply advertising services, and you are booking directly with the owners, not via an agent or operator. You may pay a little less, but there is a greater risk of fraud, and disputes may be more difficult to resolve,” he wrote.

Thieves pretending to be hotel workers were common across the world. Someone would call your hotel room, pretending to be calling from the front desk, and ask you to confirm your credit card details because of an issue that has come up. These calls will happen in the middle of the night as you are less likely to run downstairs in person to settle the issue.

Some scamming duos in Barcelona and Madrid may even show up at your hotel room, fully dressed in the hotel’s uniform, claiming a room inspection is required. One will talk to you to distract you while the other one attempts to steal your belongings while inspecting the room.

Some scammers will also slide fake takeaway menus under the door of your hotel room, from which you might make an order, giving out your account details and be charged for the meal but never see it arrive.
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#40 [Permalink] Posted on 20th October 2021 18:29
We had a customer who received a text message from Royal Mail.

*This is no joke* I actually spoke to the owners secretary and got every detail from her. It's scary! I spoke to her because we manage some of their mobile accounts.

She opened the text and clicked the link.

Within a short time, she lost her money from her bank account.

She also lost other important stuff from her phone.

After a few days, she received a text confirming that she is cancelling her phone contract and moving to another supplier and that she will receive the PAC code.

She didn't get the code, instead she got a message saying, "Sorry you are leaving us" from the mobile company. Then she lost signal on her phone.

She went to the phone shop (network involved) to find out what's going on.

They told her that her phone got hacked and someone has stolen her phone number and moved it to another network!

Now, the person who has her number can get verification codes for any bank account, social media accounts, email accounts, work accounts, HMRC accounts, passport, driving licence and the list goes on and on.

She can't do anything about it except alert the police about this fraud.


SO PLEASE BE CAREFUL AND DON'T OPEN LINKS IN YOUR EMAILS OR SMS. DON'T FORWARD ANYTHING TO ANYONE. JUST DELETE IT, YOU'LL SAVE YOUR TIME AND MAYBE YOUR MONEY AND LIFE!
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