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Is Dr Akram Nadwi Reliable In Aqida And Fiqh?

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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 6th April 2017 08:13
Sounds like poorly executed hit and run job.

Halalified YouTube Audio
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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 6th April 2017 10:50
Rajab wrote:
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I heard this yesterday just to check what were the "facts" being presented against (Dr) Akram Nadwi (HA).

Nothing substantial which I found...
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#3 [Permalink] Posted on 6th April 2017 22:46
Videos like these just further prove the points that Sh. Akram Nadwi make.

Who is this video intended for?

The video is entitled "Is Dr. Akram nadwi reliable in fiqh and Aqeeda?" On the YouTube page it says share far and wide to save yourself and others from being misled. The video starts off by saying this clarification is for the benefit of the Ummah of Rasululah Salalhu Alayhi waslaam.

Later on, however, it is mentioned that to judge the reliability of an Alim in various sciences you have to come back to the asl of the Ulama of Deoband, an in the case of aqeedah that would be what is mentioned in Ml Khalil Ahmad Saharanpuri's work. At the end it says to hold fast to Ulama of Deoband.

So is this message for , all sunni Muslims, or 'deobandi' Muslims. But then again ,Dr. Akram nadwi can also be seen as a 'Deobandi' Alim. And then who is a deobandi. Does being deobandi mean you belong to some special clique or sect? Although this would be denied, this video proves some 'deobandis' really do think that anyone who is not following the ways of the Akabir of Deoband should be automatically viewed with suspicion , and that the truth only lies within the views and practices of the Akabir of Deoband.

More to come later.
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#4 [Permalink] Posted on 7th April 2017 04:16
In the video the speaker refuses to acknowledge Sh. Akram's qualifications, makes fun of his English, and compares him being a hanafi to Dr. Zakir Naik being a hanafi!

I have read where Sh. Akram praised the ulama of Deoband, but in the video it says Sh
Akram disrespects the Masahikh, and the example he gave as was that Sh. Akram suggests that Ml Zakariya Khandalwi R.A was suffering from mental issues at some point in his life. No proof was given of this , and I don't know anything much about this and its context, but what I find strange is that the speaker implies that because Ml Zakariya was a widely accepted Alim and a saint, he has to be immune from being afflicted be a mental illness.

The speaker also uses the fact that Sh. Akram makes remarks about the current state of the Darul ulooms in England and their curriculum to attack him. Since when did Darul uloom and its syllabus became something that cannot be critiqued, and why would such critique render one unreliable in aqeedah and fiqh? Mufti Taqi Uthmani recently said :"In 1950 or 1951, my father(Mufti Shafi R.A) said that after the creation of Pakistan, we do not need Aligarh, Nadwā, or Deoband (education systems), rather we need a different education system that follows through from our predecessors (aslāf). It was strange for people to hear that a Grand Mufti of Deoband would say that we do not need Deoband, instead we need a new education system."

In relations to the accusations that Sh. Akram promoted madhab hopping, has the approach of LA madhabis, and the importance of sticking to one madhab, I would like the speaker, or any Deobandi Mufti, or daruliftaa, to come out and admit that they have not been totally honest by insisting that taqleed shaksi is the majority view and the only valid view across the madhaib. I have commented on numerous posts by Muftis promoting taqleed shaksi about the shafi view on taqleed, and got no response. If they admit that they are various views regarding 1) taking opinions from other madhabs, 3)whether a layman has a madhab and has to folow one madhab at all times, and 3)whether a layman can follow hadith which contradicts his madhab in some circumstances , then they can proceeds to refute Sh. Akram on this point, if there is anything to refute.

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#5 [Permalink] Posted on 7th April 2017 11:17

“Akram’s zeal for knowledge reminds you of the Prophetic saying: ‘Allah’s Apostle (peace be upon him) said: There are two avaricious people who are never content: one greedy of knowledge who is never content and the other greedy of the world (worldly riches and that of power) who is never content’” Shaykh Yunus Jaunpuri (teacher of Sahih al-Bukhari for over twenty years at Maza’ir al-‘Ulum, Saharanpur, India)

“[Akram Nadwi is] one of the excellent young scholars…this excellent person”, Sh. Abul Hasan Ali Nadwi

There are numerous other praises from Muhadith Shaykh Yunus Jaunpuri (DB)

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#6 [Permalink] Posted on 7th April 2017 12:40
Muadh_Khan wrote:
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Jazakallahu Khayran for the Brother who contacted me about this post and asking for my reasons defending Shaykh Akram Nadwi.

1) I am not defending him, neither do I know what crimes he has committed to be defended against

2) I am saying that I didn't find any facts in the refutation.

3) I am also asking as to how come some Senior Ulama seem to regard him as a Scholar?

No defense, just saying that the refutation isn't substantial.
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#7 [Permalink] Posted on 7th April 2017 21:16
This post has been reported. It could be due to breaking rules or something as simple as bad use of bbcodes which breaks the page format. We will attend to this soon.
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#8 [Permalink] Posted on 9th April 2017 17:41
Quote:
If they admit that they are various views regarding 1) taking opinions from other madhabs, 3)whether a layman has a madhab and has to folow one madhab at all times, and 3)whether a layman can follow hadith which contradicts his madhab in some circumstances


So what is the difference between this and what the salafis have been doing/saying?

And my second question is:

If a layman does not stick to his madhab what other principles does he have to choose opinions (with the ultimate objective of bringing himself closer to the Almighty) besides:

1. Choosing the easiest option (which is what usually happens as it is essentially following ones whims and so is not a valid option)

2. Choosing the opinon of taqwa (the safest option which hardly ever happens as life would become extremely difficult in this day and age if we choose the opinion of tawa at all times, so is not really a feasable option)

3. Choosing the majority opinion (which most lay people don't usually know what is, but is probably the only real feasible alternative)

4. Try to follow Quran and hadith (and usually get the ijtihad all wrong, so again not a valid option)

Are there other principles to pick and choose opinions when not following a madhab?

And my third question is that, no doubt there will have been individuals in the ummah who would have held this view of "not having to do taqleed shaksi for the layperson", but is this view a minority opinion itself, and if it is a minority opinion, upon what basis should a person adopt to follow this opinion so that he or she can start picking and choosing opinions (remember the basis has to one he believes will bring him more closer to the Almighty than doing taqleed shaksi)?



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#9 [Permalink] Posted on 9th April 2017 17:50
Muadh_Khan wrote:
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What year were these statements made in?

Often times it happens that a good or bad statement is made about a person, only for the person to change later on, therby nullifying the previous statements of praise or warning. Time and context are extremely important.

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#10 [Permalink] Posted on 9th April 2017 19:29
Quote:
So what is the difference between this and what the salafis have been doing/saying?
[/quote]

Yes after learning about all of the different valid views, I realized that, in practice, there is really no huge error in the approach the average salafi takes. The average salafi follows the alim he trust.

"And We sent not (as Our Messengers) before you (O Muhammad) any but men, whom We sent revelation. So ask Ahl Adh-Dhikr, if you know not.)" Surah Nahl v. 43

What IS INCORRECT is the view held by extreme salafis, which is that taqleed is totally forbidden, and it leads to the hell fire, so therefore every individual has to directly derive their Islamic rulings from the Quran and Hadith, and understand and base their views solely on evidence, and ignoring the need to ask the Ulama and to follow the Ulama. They also make it a point to condemn those who do not know the evidences and make it compulsory to know the evidence for every ruling.


Quote:
And my second question is:

If a layman does not stick to his madhab what other principles does he have to choose opinions (with the ultimate objective of bringing himself closer to the Almighty) besides:

1. Choosing the easiest option (which is what usually happens as it is essentially following ones whims and so is not a valid option)

2. Choosing the opinon of taqwa (the safest option which hardly ever happens as life would become extremely difficult in this day and age if we choose the opinion of tawa at all times, so is not really a feasable option)

3. Choosing the majority opinion (which most lay people don't usually know what is, but is probably the only real feasible alternative)

4. Try to follow Quran and hadith (and usually get the ijtihad all wrong, so again not a valid option)

Are there other principles to pick and choose opinions when not following a madhab?


The Ulama who did not make taqleed shaksi compulsory on every individual throught history were fully aware of these issues, and I am sure they discussed these issues and provided guidelines to deal with such issues which could occur, but the main point is these objections were not sufficient to impose taqleed shaksi on everyone.

[quote]And my third question is that, no doubt there will have been individuals in the ummah who would have held this view of "not having to do taqleed shaksi for the layperson", but is this view a minority opinion itself, and if it is a minority opinion, upon what basis should a person adopt to follow this opinion so that he or she can start picking and choosing opinions (remember the basis has to one he believes will bring him more closer to the Almighty than doing taqleed shaksi)?


It is not a minority view. In my next post I will show some views from each madhab which do not say taqleed shaksi is compulsory on everyone.


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#11 [Permalink] Posted on 9th April 2017 19:47
The Maliki Madhab:



Shaykh Rami Nsour:

Quote:
3. Following the opinion of another school of the four schools of thought is valid and permissible, as long as one does the whole act of worship (or interaction) according to that opinion. If for example, one will follow a Shafi’i opinion on wudu, they should also make their prayer valid according to the Shafi’i school. To join between multiple opinions is called talfeeq and is not permissible.
When choosing to follow the opinion of another school there must be a need. This is called a dispensation (rukhsa) and is permissible. What is not permissible is constant following of dispensations (it-tiba’ al rukhas). This has been mentioned by the scholars such as Imam Nawawi in the Maqasid.[/quote]
malikifiqhqa.com/uncategorized/the-travelers-prayer-mixin...


[b]The Hanbali Madhab:

Quote:
Taqleed according to the Hanbali Madhhab:
It is obligatory for a layman to make Taqleed of a scholar and there is no difference of opinion between Ahlul Sunnah on this.
It is permissible for him to make Taqleed (follow) one particular Madhhab on all issues. This is not, however, obligatory according to the Hanbali Madhhab. So, he is allowed to either stick to one Madhhab always; or to follow a Madhhab or a scholar on one issue and a different Madhhab or scholar on another issue. But this is on the condition that he does not pick and choose based on his desires and what suits him, because that would be prohibited.
He is not obliged to ask the Mufti for the proof according to the consensus of Ahlu-s Sunnah, because the scholars have already done that job, and the layman will never be able to do as good a job so he is better off taking a rest.
However, if he feels more comfortable with another opinion that opposes his Madhhab because the majority of scholars hold this opinion for example, then like we said before, he does not have to stick to his Madhhab on that issue and he can choose to follow the majority of scholars (or the opinion of another of the four schools) in that case.
Whether you ask for proof or not, you are still making Taqleed, because the proof alone for a layman is not sufficient. Rather, you must follow a scholar as Allaah commanded you. You are not at a different level called: Ittiba' simply because you have an idea of one or two evidences presented by the Mufti. Rather, if you are not a scholar, you are a Muqallid.
Not every Muqallid is the same. Taqleed is of levels: Some are more knowledgeable than others, but they are equal in that they all must ask a scholar if they themselves are not scholars.
This is the position of the Hanbali madhhab and the majority of scholars. For more information see the references below.
[References: al-Rawdhah by Ibn Qudamah (r), Al-Wadih by Ibn 'Aqeel (r), al-Musawwadah by al-Majd Ibn Taymiyyah (r) and Sharh al-Tahrir by al-Mardawi (r)][/quote]

Taken from The Hanbali Madhab Facebook page.


Sheikh Musa Furber also states on Facebook regarding Ibn Rajab’s "Refutation of Those Who Do Not Follow The Four Schools"
Quote:
" No, Ibn Rajab does not say that an individual must stay within a single madhhab in all things."
[/quote]


The Shafi Madhab

Shaikh Taha Karan as Shafi (graduate of Darul Uloom Deoband):

[quote]LEAVING THE BOUNDS OF THE MADHHAB
There will inevitably be instances where followers of a particular madhhab come face to face with ahadith to which their madhhab apparently does not conform. What is to be done in such cases? Should the person summarily abandon the teaching of the madhhab in favour of the hadith? Or should he dutifully stick to the madhhab and ignore the hadith?
Neither of these two approaches is free from certain undesirable outcomes. The fuqaha of our madhhab have therefore resolved the issue in a most ingenious manner that addresses both the praiseworthy desire to practice upon the hadith and the apprehension that this may lead to chaotic fiqh. In his introduction to al-Majmu‘ (vol. 1 p. 136) Imam al-Nawawi provides us with the following guidelines:
"Any Shafi‘i who finds a hadith going against his madhhab should look into the matter [as follows]: If he possesses the complete requirements of ijtihad without restriction, or in that chapter, or [even] in that point [alone], he may independently practice upon [the hadith]. If he does not [possess it] and finds it difficult to go against the hadith, and his search for a valid explanation of the hadith [within his madhhab] does not provide a convincing solution, then he may practice upon the hadith with one condition, which is that another independent [mujtahid] imam other than al-Shafi‘i should have practiced upon it. This would then be a valid pretext for him to leave the madhhab of his imam."
It is of interest here to note that all the other major schools of thought have, with varying degrees of moderation, looked upon skin contact between male and female as nullifying wudu. The Hanbalis and Malikis add the condition of deriving pleasure from such contact, while the Hanafis regard only such contact to nullify the wudu whereby there is mutual touching of the sexual organs without penetration. It should be admitted, though, that this position of the Hanafi madhhab is not founded upon the verse that speaks of touching women, but rather upon the contention that such touching almost invariably leads to the emission of fluid, which in itself is factor that nullifies the wudu.
The idea behind following madhahib is not to turn people into prisoners of their madhahib, but rather to facilitate practicing upon the Qur’an and the Sunnah. No madhhab has ever purported to be a replacement for the Qur’an and the Sunnah, nor can it ever be. The facility that a madhhab provides is that of a systematic approach to the sources of our law, accompanied by the benefit of generation after generation of the best, purest and most capable minds. And even then, there has been recognition of the fact that situations do arise when the follower of a madhhab finds it difficult to practice contrary to the apparent meaning of a hadith that he has come across. Technically speaking, all that is required for a person faced by such a situation is that his practice be based upon the ijtihad of a valid mujtahid.
But beyond the technical aspect there is another angle: that of conduct and etiquette. When the situation warrants departure from one's own maddhab and all the requirements are met, this does not mean that one now has a licence to indulge in disparagement of the imam from whose madhhab one has departed in that one particular issue. Never must sight be lost of the fact that one's own minuscule smidgen of pseudo-insight is still aeons away from the knowledge possessed by those paragons of scholarship and virtue. No one who is acutely aware of his own deficiencies would ever descend into using disrespectful language against the mujtahid imams of the Ummah.
The true Shafi‘i or Hanafi, therefore, is not only he who is prepared abandon the opinions of Abu Hanifah and al-Shafi‘i when he perceives them to be in apparent contradiction to the hadith. At a deeper level it is he who is able to differ with the position of another without sliding into egotism and disparagement.


attalib.blogspot.com/2008/06/invalidating-wudu-by-touchin...

Also search for ADAB - MANNERS & DIFFERENCES - SHEIKH TAHA KARAAN on vimeo and listen from 59:50 to the end of the lecture.

Sheikh Taha Karan also says the Hanafis have this view in the writings of Shah Waliullah Dehlawi.

Shaikh Amjad Rasheed:
[quote]
(1) What the scholars of exacting verification (muhaqqiqeen) have explicitly stated is that it is not obligatory to follow a single school in all matters. Rather, it is permissible for one to switch from one school to another as long as one does not seek out dispensations, which means to take the easiest position from every school.

islamqa.org/shafii/qibla-shafii/33350



The Hanafi Madhab


Shaykh Faraz Rabbani:

[quote] Following another madhhab completely in a complete action, and (b) mixing the positions of more than one madhhab within one action, in such a way that it is not independently valid in either one (talfiq). The latter is impermissible and invalid according to the fuqaha. Ibn Abidin (imam of the late Hanafi school for fatwa) and Ibn Hajar al-Haytami (imam of the late Shafi`i school for fatwa) both transmit scholarly consensus (ijma`) regarding its impermissibility.

Following another madhhab completely in a complete action, however, is valid according to the majority of the scholars of usul al-fiqh, and fuqaha, on the condition that there not be a systematic seeking out of dispensations. This was confirmed by Ibn Abidin in his Hashiya, Tahtawi in his Hashiyat al-Durr, Abd al-Ghani al-Nabulsi in his Sharh al-Tariqa al-Muhammadiyya and in his treatise on ijtihad, taqlid and talfiq, and is the position adopted by the Syrian Hanafi scholars.

The scholars of the Indian Sub-continent generally do not allow this, except under exceptional circumstances, but not because it is per se invalid, but for obvious reasons:

(a) In their millieu, it is not normally possible for one to find a qualified source or scholar from another school;

(b) To close the door to the systematic seeking of dispensations.

But, even Indo-Pak scholars who advocate this position admit, this is more an answer of prudence than a theoretical impermissibility.

I wonder whether the position enunciated in the major texts of the school is not more suited to our situation in the West. People have a lot of difficult situations and challenges in their lives, and this makes things easy for them while remaining within the boundaries of sound sunni scholarship, instead of running to the modernists and salafis...

Sticking to One School

It is not religiously binding on the Muslim to stick to one school on all matters, without exception, as both al-Tahtawi and Ibn Abidin (Allah have mercy on them), the two leading late authorities for fatwa in the Hanafi school, both explain. Rather, there is nothing wrong with taking a dispensation if there is a need; what is impermissible is to make it a habit to seek out dispensations [i.e. even if there is no hardship or need].

The Path of Taqwa

The path of taqwa, as the scholars and sufis explain, is to avoid taking dispensations unless there is genuine hardship in following one's own school. In fact, they say that those who have learned their own school should seek out the strictest positions from other school whenever reasonably possible, so that one's worship and practice is sound without argument.

May Allah grant us beneficial knowledge, and the success to act according to it, on the footsteps of the His Beloved (Allah bless him and give him peace), with the secret of sincerity, without which actions are but lifeless forms.

And Allah knows best.

Wassalam,


www.islamicboard.com/general/134288892-picking-choosing-m...

also mentioned here islamqa.org/hanafi/qibla-hanafi/35746
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#12 [Permalink] Posted on 9th April 2017 20:53
JazakAllah. I have no problem with those quotes, and completely agree in the manner stated in the quotes taqleed shaksi is not neccassary.

Now here is a real life scenario about what is actually going on when people start coming out with things like taleed shkasi is not neccassary (and which is why I was concerned about what you said initially). This scenario will also highlight the profound wisdom of why many of the ulema have promoted only taqleed shaksi with extremely rare exception and it is not becasue they have "not been entirley honest".

So the scenario:
There is an opinion within the maliki madhab that considers drawing animate pictures as permissable, as long as they are not 3D i.e statutes/models. So animate picture books are fine.

Would you adopt this opinion in this day and age if you were not a maliki. If so then upon what basis would you adopt it?

If you would not adopt this opinion, then upon what basis, why not? What would you say to a non maliki who decides to adopt it (on the pretext of not agreeing with taqleed shaksi), even though there is no real pressing need for it to be adopted, and it is NOT for necassary for educational purposes.

This is a real life scenario going on with someone I know. Theory, and the way the theory is applied in real life are two very different things.
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#13 [Permalink] Posted on 9th April 2017 21:03
Quote:
If you would not adopt this opinion, then upon what basis, why not? What would you say to a non maliki who decides to adopt it (on the pretext of not agreeing with taqleed shaksi), even though there is no real pressing need for it to be adopted, and it is NOT for necassary for educational purposes. [/quote]

I know I am not answering your question, but we also have to bear in mind what is meant by "due to a need". Also this needs to be clarified because the point is being made regarding opinions between madhabs,but the examples given are pertaining to differences in the madhab itself.
[quote]Following A Single Madhhab

While following a maddhab is required, following a single madhhab on every issue is not according to many scholars. The obligation of taqlid is to follow a school or an authority on a given issue or set of issues. Thus, for example, an individual is permitted to follow the Hanafi school in prayer and the Maliki school in rulings related to Zakat. This is not interdicted so long as one:

a. actually knows the rulings of the other school on the issue, and
b. does not systematically seek out dispensations (i.e. the easiest position).

[Ibn `Abidin, Radd al-Muhtar (1:33); Nabulsi, Khulasa al-tahqiq (56)]

Therefore, it would be permitted for you to follow the opinion of another school if you have a valid reason for doing so.

A valid reason should not be understood as simply referring to cases of real need or necessity. Rather, even convenience cab be a valid reason to follow another opinion. For example, you may choose to pray Asr according to the earlier time because it is easier for you from a scheduling perspective, something important for this working and studying. Similarly, you may choose to eat seafood because your family does so. The aofrementioned opinions have a strong basis in our tradition and, therefore, may be followed as long as one does not become habitual in seeking out dispensations of this nature.


Answer approved by Sh. Faraz Rabbani:

seekershub.org/ans-blog/2015/03/25/how-to-choose-to-follow-an-opinion-within-a-school-of-law/
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#14 [Permalink] Posted on 9th April 2017 21:22
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#15 [Permalink] Posted on 9th April 2017 21:26
Concerned wrote:
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You've lost me, I have no idea what you are saying here. Please re explain.

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