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Leprosy?

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#16 [Permalink] Posted on 6th July 2020 14:06
abuzayd2k wrote:
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My call for what? My very first post on this thread starts off with...

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I can't comment on the hadith


Then in my second post I reiterated...

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My comment was to highlight the fact that modern medicine is not absolute.


And now you want me to defend something I never said?
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#17 [Permalink] Posted on 6th July 2020 14:18
I found this to be of help:

With regard to Islam and leprosy, several different terms have been used to describe leprosy in the Quran and hadiths [3]. For example, the term baras is the only term used in the Quran to refer to leprosy [3]. The other most commonly used term to describe leprosy is judham, which can be found in the hadith and sira literature [3]. Interestingly, the verbal form of judham (jadhama) means to “cut off or amputate” which is thought to be how leprosy became associated with the Arabic term [3]. For example, one Arabic dictionary notes that judham causes a “cracking” of the skin [3]. The term majdhum (from the same root) refers to a person who is afflicted with judham [3]. While the terms abras and judham may suggest two different forms of leprosy, it is difficult to apply the strict definitions for leprosy established by lexicographers, as many were written after the major hadith works and early histories of Muhammad [3]. Finally, it is also challenging to classify or distinguish baras and judham based on modern descriptions, in part because, today, leprosy has many subdivisions [3]. Nevertheless, many physicians today agree that two main forms of leprosy exist (Tuberculoid and Lepromatous) [3].
Some other considerations are worth keeping in mind. Whereas the modern connotation of ‘leprosy’ is Hansen’s disease, Near Eastern people in Late Antiquity and medieval times did not classify diseases in the same way. While some of the words they used have commonly been translated as ‘leprosy,’ numerous writers have pointed out that people at that time used those terms more broadly than just for referring to Hansen’s disease. Thus, the Jewish Encyclopedia [5] explains that in the ancient world, people referred to a number of skin diseases (including Hansen’s disease) as leprosy, and that translation into several languages has compounded the confusion. The twentieth-century Tunisian Quranic exegete and commentator, Tahir ibn ‘Ashur [6], similarly observes that the disease called leprosy by the ancient Hebrews and Arabs (in Aramaic, tsaraath) is not the same disease as today’s leprosy, even though the same name may be used for both.

More at: www.mdpi.com/2075-4698/10/1/6/htm
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#18 [Permalink] Posted on 6th July 2020 15:05
bint e aisha wrote:
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Although both generally "leprosy" but Baras in Arabic, Urdu and Persian generally refers to "pigmentation" problems. You often see people that their face has pigmentation problems. This may not be "contagious" at many stages and may be relatively harmless apart from physical discolouration



By the way this is incurable in our times and Allah Ta'ala has stated that Nabi Isa (AS) cured severe skin pigmentation issues.

Loading Qur'aan Verse

Juzam in Arabic, Urdu and Persian on the other hand is blood, pus and material oozing out which is infectious because of lesions which are contagious



Loading Hadeeth

Note: Nabi (Sallallaho Alaihe Wasallam) has used a very specific term for a very specific reason i.e. we now know that blood, pus, liquids transmit infections and he has asked people to avoid contact to stop the transmission. Same applies to Coronavirus (COVID-19) and it is why Ulama have deemed that distancing during rows of Salah is permissible because we now have greater understanding of how "infections" pass. People coming to the Masjid are not Medical Doctors so you would give people very simple instructions to follow i.e. Run like Hell!

P.S: You don't run away from someone who has discoloured face or pigmentation issues but you run away from someone who has lesions and blood/pus oozing out!
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