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Taalibah, Maria al-Qibtiyya, abu mohammed, Jinn, Acacia, True Life, BHAI1, Naqshband66, Moonlight
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#16 [Permalink] Posted on 19th March 2020 08:40
Readers Digest List of Most Notorious Psychopaths


1. Ed Gein

2. Charles Manson

3. Ted Bundy

4. Richard Remirez

5. Jack, the Ripper

6. Albert DeSalvo

7. Jeffrey Dahmer

8. The Zodiac Killer

9. Vlad, the Impaler

10. Dennis Rader

11. Elizabeth Bathory

12. David Berkovitz

13. Albert Fish

14. HH Holmes

15. Aileen Wournos

For more details please go to the original site here.
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#17 [Permalink] Posted on 6th April 2020 15:45
I was going to open a new thread on mental health but I came across this thread. Although the following isn’t exactly in the line of the valuable information already on here I would like to post the following to also give the thread a boost. Hope you don’t me adding to it.

Stress - main cause of disease and illnesses

Negative emotions such as fear, stress, anger, jealousy and hopelessness cause our nervous system to switch from our normal, balanced, healthy nervous system from “Rest and Digest” (Parasympathetic Nervous System) to “Fight or Flight” mode (Sympathetic Nervous System).

When you are in fear, stress or in “Fight or Flight mode” (Sympathetic Nervous system), your body releases certain hormones and chemicals such as dopamine, epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), norepinephrine (noradrenaline), and especially cortisol. Your cells close down, the blood goes to the muscles, brain and other parts of the body instead of our other body systems which help us get oxygen, hydration and nutrition such as the digestive system.

If you stay in fear or stress for a long time, then through these hormones or the body’s response to fear, your body goes into an acidic state.

If your internal body stays in a state of high acidity for a long time, it weakens your immune system and causes a whole bunch of health conditions, including Cancer, Diabetes and many other serious health conditions.

According to many studies, the main cause of disease and illness is stress; www.webmd.com/balance/stress-management/features/10-fixab...

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#18 [Permalink] Posted on 7th April 2020 07:16
It is appropriate for this thread sister.
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#19 [Permalink] Posted on 7th April 2020 11:18
What is anger?

We all feel angry at times – it's part of being human. Anger is a normal, healthy emotion, which we might experience if we feel:
Attacked
deceived
frustrated
invalidated or unfairly treated
It isn't necessarily a 'bad' emotion; in fact it can sometimes be useful. For example, feeling angry about something can:

help us identify problems or things that are hurting us
motivate us to create change, achieve our goals and move on
help us stay safe and defend ourselves in dangerous situations by giving us a burst of energy as part of our fight or flight system

Most people will experience episodes of anger which feel manageable and don't have a big impact on their lives. Learning healthy ways to recognise, express and deal with anger is important for our mental and physical health.

When is anger a problem?

Anger only becomes a problem when it gets out of control and harms you or people around you. This can happen when:

you regularly express your anger through unhelpful or destructive behaviour

your anger is having a negative impact on your overall mental and physical health

anger becomes your go-to emotion, blocking out your ability to feel other emotions

you haven't developed healthy ways to express your anger

What is unhelpful angry behaviour?

How you behave when you're angry depends on how well you're able to identify and cope with your feelings, and how you've learned to express them.

Not everyone expresses anger in the same way. For example, some unhelpful ways you may have learned to express anger include:

Outward aggression and violence -
such as shouting, swearing, slamming doors, hitting or throwing things and being physically violent or verbally abusive and threatening towards others.

Inward aggression -
such as telling yourself that you hate yourself, denying yourself your basic needs (like food, or things that might make you happy), cutting yourself off from the world and self-harming.

Non-violent or passive aggression -
such as ignoring people or refusing to speak to them, refusing to do tasks, or deliberately doing things poorly, late or at the last possible minute, and being sarcastic or sulky while not saying anything explicitly aggressive or angry.

If you find you express your anger through outward aggression and violence, this can be extremely frightening and damaging for people around you - especially children. And it can have serious consequences: it could mean you lose your family, job and get into trouble with the law. In this case it's very important to seek treatment and support.

But even if you're never outwardly violent or aggressive towards others, and never even raise your voice, you might still recognise some of these angry behaviours and feel that they're a problem for you. For example, you turn your anger inwards and self-harm or deny yourself food.

From the Mind website
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#20 [Permalink] Posted on 8th April 2020 12:03
Anxiety and panic attacks

What is anxiety?

Anxiety is what we feel when we are worried, tense or afraid – particularly about things that are about to happen, or which we think could happen in the future. Anxiety is a natural human response when we perceive that we are under threat. It can be experienced through our thoughts, feelings and physical sensations.

Most people feel anxious at times. It's particularly common to experience some anxiety while coping with stressful events or changes, especially if they could have a big impact on your life.

What is the 'fight, flight or freeze' response?

Like all animals, human beings have evolved ways to help us protect ourselves from danger. When we feel under threat our bodies react by releasing certain hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol. These hormones:

make us feel more alert, so we can act faster

make our hearts beat faster, quickly sending blood to where it's needed most.

After we feel the threat has passed, our bodies release other hormones to help our muscles relax. This can sometimes cause us to shake.

This is commonly called the ‘fight, flight or freeze’ response – it’s something that happens automatically in our bodies, and we have no control over it.?

When is anxiety a mental health problem?

Anxiety can become a mental health problem if it impacts on your ability to live your life as fully as you want to. For example, it may be a problem for you if:

your feelings of anxiety are very strong or last for a long time
your fears or worries are out of proportion to the situation

you avoid situations that might cause you to feel anxious

your worries feel very distressing or are hard to control

you regularly experience symptoms of anxiety, which could include panic attacks

you find it hard to go about your everyday life or do things you enjoy.

If your symptoms fit a particular set of medical criteria then you might be diagnosed with a particular anxiety disorder. But it's also possible to experience problems with anxiety without having a specific diagnosis.
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#21 [Permalink] Posted on 14th April 2020 14:05
What are anxiety disorders?

Anxiety can be experienced in lots of different ways. If your experiences meet certain criteria your doctor might diagnose you with a specific anxiety disorder.

Some commonly diagnosed anxiety disorders are:

Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD)

– this means having regular or uncontrollable worries about many different things in your everyday life. Because there are lots of possible symptoms of anxiety this can be quite a broad diagnosis, meaning that the problems you experience with GAD might be quite different from another person's experiences.

Social anxiety disorder

– this diagnosis means you experience extreme fear or anxiety triggered by social situations (such as parties, workplaces, or any situation in which you have to talk to another person). It is also known as social phobia. (See our page on types of phobia for more information.)

Panic disorder

– this means having regular or frequent panic attacks without a clear cause or trigger. Experiencing panic disorder can mean that you feel constantly afraid of having another panic attack, to the point that this fear itself can trigger your panic attacks. (See our page on panic attacks for more information.)

Phobias

– a phobia is an extreme fear or anxiety triggered by a particular situation (such as social situations) or a particular object (such as spiders). (See our pages on phobias for more information.)

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

– this is a diagnosis you may be given if you develop anxiety problems after going through something you found traumatic. PTSD can cause flashbacks or nightmares which can feel like you’re re-living all the fear and anxiety you experienced during the actual event. (See our pages on PTSD for more information.)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)

– you may be given this diagnosis if your anxiety problems involve having repetitive thoughts, behaviours or urges.

Health anxiety

– this means you experience obsessions and compulsions relating to illness, including researching symptoms or checking to see if you have them. It is related to OCD.

Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD)

– this means you experience obsessions and compulsions relating to your physical appearance.

Perinatal anxiety or perinatal OCD

– some women develop anxiety problems during pregnancy or in the first year after giving birth.

You might not have, or want, a diagnosis of a particular anxiety disorder – but it might still be useful to learn more about these different diagnoses to help you think about your own experiences of anxiety, and consider options for support.
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