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#196 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 09:34
I wrote:
You know what Laailaha illallah means right? There is no God But Allah. But that's just tongue service. That's just what it says. One can do a thesis on its interpretation.

I'll try and go to into detail later or find an article on what I mean.

Here is a simple explanation
Halalified YouTube Audio

www.youtube.com/watch?v=v3ODaskZUxU

Here is another example of how in depth one can get into to try and understand the meaning of one sentence.
Disclaimer, I have not heard these, it's not a language I understand (one of them at least) and I am not endorsing anything from the speakers except that these are examples of the length one can get into
Example 1 is a 2 hour long lecture www.youtube.com/watch?v=usE72iRk_P8
Example 2 is 4 hour long lecture www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4Pq6Sh-XW0

When we say La-ilaah (There is no God) we need to mean it! For example, if we give in to our illicit desires, we are giving in to our Nafs and gave preference to our Desire over God and thus made our desire, god, even though it was temporary. See this thread about desires "Naughty but Nice?"
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#197 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 10:36
I am not exactly sure what abu Muhammad is saying, but I would go with these views from islamqa.com

Quote:

Is it permissible to read the Qur'aan without understanding its meanings?.
Answer
Praise be to Allaah.
Yes, it is permissible for believing men and women to read the Qur'aan even if they do not understand the meaning, but it is prescribed to ponder and think so that one may understand, and to refer to books of tafseer (commentaries) if one has enough knowledge to understand them, and to refer to books of tafseer and Arabic language in order to benefit from that, and he can ask scholars about anything he does not understand. What is meant is that he should ponder the meanings, because Allah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“(This is) a Book (the Qur’aan) which We have sent down to you, full of blessings, that they may ponder over its Verses, and that men of understanding may remember”

[Saad 38:29].

The believer should ponder the meanings, i.e., he should pay attention to reading and think about what it means; he should understand the meanings and thus he will benefit from it. If he does not understand the meaning perfectly, he will still understand many meanings. So let him read carefully and ponder and understand. This also applies to women. The reader should benefit from the words of his or her Lord and understand the meaning so that he may act upon it. Allah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“Do they not then think deeply in the Qur’aan, or are their hearts locked up (from understanding it)?”

[Muhammad 47:24].

Our Lord, may He be glorified and exalted, urges and encourages us to think and ponder His words. When the believer -- man or woman -- reads the Book of Allah, it is prescribed for them to ponder and think and pay attention to what is read, so that they may benefit from the words of Allah and so that they may understand the words of Allah and so that they may act upon what they learn from the words of Allah. They may seek help in doing so from books of tafseer that have been written by scholars such as those by Ibn Katheer, Ibn Jareer, al-Baghawi, al-Shawkaani and others. They may also make use of books of Arabic language and ask scholars who are known for their knowledge and virtue about anything they do not understand. End quote.

Shaykh ‘Abd al-‘Azeez ibn Baaz (may Allah have mercy on him).
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#198 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 10:37
Quote:
Will a person (a believer) be rewarded if he listens to the Qur’aan without understanding what he is listening to, but he knows that it is Qur’aan? Or will he not be rewarded unless he understands what he is hearing? I hope you could give some evidence from the Qur’aan and saheeh hadeeth.

Answer
Praise be to Allaah.

Firstly:

Allah, may He be exalted, has commanded the believers to listen to the Qur’aan attentively, in a general command. He says (interpretation of the meaning): “So, when the Qur’aan is recited, listen to it, and be silent that you may receive mercy” [al-A‘raaf 7:204].

Shaykh al-Sa‘di (may Allah have mercy on him) said:

This command is general and includes everyone who hears the Book of Allah being recited. He is enjoined to listen to it and keep quiet. The difference between listening and keeping quiet is that keeping quiet is done outwardly by not speaking or being distracted with anything that would keep one from focusing on listening to it.

As for listening to it, this means that one hears it with an attentive heart, pondering the meaning of what one is listening to. The one who adheres to these two commands when the Book of Allah is recited will attain a great deal of good, beneficial knowledge, ongoing and renewed faith, increased guidance and insight into his religion. Hence Allah connected the attainment of mercy to them, which indicates that the one who does not keep quiet and listen attentively when the Book is recited to him will be deprived of the share of mercy and has missed out on a great deal of good.

The most emphatic command with regard to listening to the Qur’aan attentively has to do with prayers in which Qur’aan is recited out loud by the imam, in which one is enjoined to listen attentively, to such an extent that most of the scholars say that his focusing on keeping quiet and listening attentively takes priority over his reciting al-Faatihah etc.

End quote from Tafseer al-Sa‘di, 314

The greater aim of keeping quiet and listening attentively is so that the listener may ponder and understand the meanings, and act upon them. Imam al-Tabari (may Allah have mercy on him) said:

Allah says to those who believe in Him and in His Book, for whom the Qur’aan is guidance and mercy: “So, when the Qur’aan is recited”, to you, O believers; “listen to it”, i.e. lend your ears so that you might understand its verses and learn from its exhortation; “and be silent” and listen to it attentively, so that you might understand and ponder, and do not utter idle talk during it lest you do not understand; “that you may receive mercy” i.e., that you might receive the mercy of your Lord by heeding His exhortation and adhering to His limits and to what He enjoins upon you in the verses.

End quote from Tafseer al-Tabari, 13/244

If a person manages to achieve that, i.e., keeping quiet, listening attentively, pondering what is recited to him and understanding its meanings, that will bring him goodness in this world and the Hereafter.

Shaykh al-Islam Ibn Taymiyah (may Allah have mercy on him) said:

By means of this listening, Allah guides His slaves and sets straight their affairs in this world and the Hereafter; with this the Messenger (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him) was sent, and he enjoined it upon the Muhaajireen and Ansaar and those who followed them in truth. The early generations used to gather for this purpose. When the Companions of the Messenger of Allah (blessings and peace of Allah be upon him) gathered together, they would tell one of their number to recite whilst they listened. ‘Umar ibn al-Khattaab (may Allah be pleased with him) would say to Abu Moosa: Remind us of our Lord, and Abu Moosa would recite Qur’aan whilst they listened.

End quote from Majmoo‘ al-Fataawa, 11/626

Secondly:

As listening in the complete sense is that in which one understands and ponders, there is no doubt that the one who does that as much is he is able is to be commended for what he does, and he is excused for what he is incapable of. But what one is incapable of should not be an excuse for not doing what one is able to do of goodness. What is possible is not to be omitted because of what is difficult; in other words, whatever a person is able to do of obligatory or mustahabb actions is not waived because of what he is incapable of doing, because Allah says (interpretation of the meaning): “So keep your duty to Allaah and fear Him as much as you can”

[al-Taghaabun 64:16].

Shaykh Ibn ‘Uthaymeen (may Allah have mercy on him) was asked:

Will a person be rewarded if he reads the Qur’aan, even if he does not understand its meanings?

He replied:

The Holy Qur’aan is blessed, as Allah, may He be exalted, says (interpretation of the meaning): “(This is) a Book (the Qur’aan) which We have sent down to you, full of blessings, that they may ponder over its Verses, and that men of understanding may remember” [Saad 38:29]. So man is enjoined to read it, whether he understands its meanings or not. But the believer who is enjoined to act upon it should not read Qur’aan without understanding its meanings. If a person wants to learn medicine, for example, and studies the books of medicine, he cannot benefit from them unless he understands their meanings and they are explained to him; in fact he will be very keen to understand the meanings so that he can apply them. So why do you think anyone should read the Book of Allah, may He be glorified and exalted, which is a healing for what is in the hearts and exhortation to people, without pondering and without understanding its meanings? For this reason the Companions (may Allah be pleased with them) would not move on from ten verses until they had learned them and learned the knowledge they contained and how to act upon it. So they learned the Qur’aan and knowledge and action all together.

A person will be rewarded for reading the Qur’aan whether he understands its meanings or not, but he should be very keen to understand its meanings and to learn these meanings from scholars who are trustworthy in their knowledge. If he has no access to a scholar who can teach him the meanings, he may refer to the trustworthy books of tafseer, such as Tafseer Ibn Jareer, Tafseer Ibn Katheer and others which pay attention to the tafseer that is based on reports narrated from the Sahaabah and the Taabi‘een (may Allah be pleased with them).

End quote from Fataawa Noor ‘ala al-Darb, tape 85, side A

And Allah knows best.
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#199 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 10:44
Concerned wrote:
I am not exactly sure what abu Muhammad is saying

Which part so I may clarify or correct, jzk. You can PM if needed and apologies for not being clear.
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#200 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 10:51
Quote:
Assalamu alaikumWhat should be the purpose of reading the Quran? Is reading the Quran without understanding good?What are the benefits of reciting the Quran?And what are the prerequisites of reciting the Quran?Some people wants to recite the Quran as much as they can in the month of Ramadan, but they don't understand its meaning. They use to say that Allah rewards many times for simply reading the Quran.

Answer
Praise be to Allah, the Lord of the Worlds; and may His blessings and peace be upon our Prophe7t Muhammad and upon all his Family and Companions.

One's first goal of reading the Qur'an should to please Allah. Imam Al-Nawawi (May Allah's mercy be upon him) said in his book Al-Tibyan Fi Adaab Hamalatul Qur'an: 'A teacher's and reciter's first purpose should be acquiring Allah's pleasure' Allah says:
And they were commanded not, but that they should worship Allâh, and worship none but Him Alone (abstaining from ascribing partners to Him), and perform As-Salât (Iqâmat-as-Salât) and give Zakât: and that is the right religion
[98:5]
Other goals of reciting Al-Qur'an include: seeking Allah's guidance, His reward and increasing faith.
As for your question concerning reciting the Qur'an without understanding, know that there is no harm in such a situation although it is much better for one to understand as stated in the Qur'an:
(This is) a Book (the Qur'an) which We have sent down to you, full of blessings that they may ponder over its Verses, and that men of understanding may remember.
[38:29]
As for benefits of recitation of Qur'an, here are some of them:
1- The Qur'an will intercede for its reciter on the Day of Judgment as the Prophet (Sallallahu Alaihi wa Sallam) said: "Recite the Qur'an, since it will be an intercessor to its owners (those who read, learn, teach and practise)." [ Muslim from Abu Umamah (RAA)].
2- The Qur'an will help one occupy the highest ranks in the other life as well as the one who finds difficulty in recitation will receive a double reward; i.e. of reading and facing difficulties. A sound Hadith recorded by Bukhari and Muslim from Aisha (RAA) said ' The one who recites the Qura'n skillfully will be with angels on the Day of Judgement; the one who recites it with difficulty will be rewarded in double.'
For more details concerning benefits, please check with:
-Al-Burhaan Fi Uloom Al-Qur'an, al-Zrkashi.
-Fadeel Al-Qur'an, al-Nasai
-Fadeel Al-Qur'an, Abu Bakr Ibn Abu Shaibah.
After that, here are some prerequisites for recitation:
1- One must be on full purity before touching the Qur'an.
2- Bearing in mind acquiring Allah's pleasure through this act.
3- One has to imagine, according to Imam Al-Nawawi, that he is talking with Allah, since one recites His Real Words, and He sees us.
4- One is advised to have a clean place, turning one's face towards Al-Qiblah.
5- One is advised to say:
A'uzu Billah i Minashaitan al-Rajim
at the start.
6- One is advised to start with:
Bismilla al-Rahman al-Rahim
at the beginning of every Sura.
7- One is advised to have good understanding and submission.
Allah knows best


www.islamweb.net/en/fatwa/85360/etiquette-and-reward-of-r...
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#201 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 11:15
Some tweets from Shaikh Suhaib Saeed:

Quote:

After seeing people’s reactions to his last thread I almost hesitate to RT this, but seriously..!
One way I’d make the point is that the Qur’an has its effects cognitively. I’ve spoken about this w.r.t. the Fatiha and the Mu’awwidhatayn.

I have no need to reject all dimensions/effects of the Qur’an that have nothing to do with meaning, but I also balk at the idea that meaning is just one important thing. It really is THE THING and our collective attitudes and practices are not reflecting that. It is a crisis.


Quote:
Reflection on the 'reciting Qur'an with/out understanding' discussion:

A point that should never have escaped people's attention is that whether someone gets reward/blessings or is in the domain of نرجو and نخشى - hope/fear, not the domain of certainty and declarations.

In other words, we can say "I fear that such a person may miss out on much reward" or "I hope nevertheless that they would be blessed" - but some of the language went too far... including that thing that looked like a press release from Ahl al-Sunnah wa'l-Jama'ah. 😆

The matter always returns to intention: when we start reciting, we should obviously intend something more than just "to recite the Qur'an". Even intending "worship" is somehow lacking content.

"To listen to Allah's words and follow them" is more on the right track.

So then if that is our genuine intention, we will take whatever steps equip us better to do so. That is how we worship through the Qur'an, and how it becomes "dhikr" - which is obviously more about the heart/mind than the tongue.

True, Ibn 'Ata'illah wisely said that it's better to do be distracted *while maintaining the verbal remembrance* than to turn away from the remembrance altogether. But all our movement should be towards helping people connect meaningfully.
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#202 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 11:30
abu mohammed wrote:
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If there is no disagreement with my posts then we are on the same page :)

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#203 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 11:39
Should I Focus on Memorization or Understanding? - Nouman Ali Khan
www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-IjlXccZM0&t=0m26s
(Tried to time stamp the video above in audio form but it's not working here.)

The Final Miracle by Nouman Ali Khan
Halalified YouTube Audio



Quote:
A translation of the Quran may capture some part of it's meaning but it can never capture the miracle and the beauty of quran. Paraphrased Quote of Nouman Ali Khan
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#204 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 14:30
abu mohammed wrote:
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Quote:
I'll give you an example.
You know what Laailaha illallah means right? There is no God But Allah. But that's just tongue service. That's just what it says.

I hadn't actually looked up the translation of that phrase yet. I guess that goes to my point.
If I walked around all day saying Laailaha illallah all day without knowing it's meaning, would that mean anything?
If I were to walk around all day thinking There is no God but Allah, that definitely has a meaning and a benefit.

Again, much of this only goes to the point of me being new. I know I will eventually learn more Arabic. When I am able to recite a surrah in Arabic AND know the meaning of my words, I will have no problem reciting it in Arabic.

I'm much more concerned about the scholars that say prayer (salah) may only be done in Arabic.
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#205 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 14:44
In Need of Teaching wrote:
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Let's seoarate the differences between the importance of

1) salah in Arabic
2) Quran in Arabic in Salah
3) Quran in Arabic outside of Salah
4) other supplications and praises outside of salah in Arabic

Nothing wrong with #4 i.e. supplicating to Allah and praising Allah in your own language outside of salah. Actually one should know what one is saying as you said.

#3 is about balance as explained in above video and other posts, as we are speaking about the word of Allah.
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#206 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 14:57
Concerned wrote:
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Ok.

I wasn't aware there is a difference between numbers 1 and 2.

2. This may only be due to my unique circumstance in that the only way for me to do salah, is to do it by myself. (At least 99% of the time this will be true.)
So, for me to do my salah 5 times per day. I have to either do it in English, or not at all.

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#207 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 15:06
In Need of Teaching wrote:
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Quote:
If I walked around all day saying Laailaha illallah all day without knowing it's meaning, would that mean anything?
If I were to walk around all day thinking There is no God but Allah, that definitely has a meaning and a benefit.

Both are valid and are just as important but with time you'll understand.

A lot of reward for doing just that..

See below:


THE VIRTUES OF RECITING LA ILAHA ILLALLAH
Question

What are the rewards of saying La ilaha illallah?


Answer

There are numerous virtues of reciting La ilaha illallah. Among them are the following:

1) Sayyiduna Abu Hurayrah (radiyallahu ‘anhu) once asked Nabi (sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam), “Who will be the fortunate person to gain your intercession on the day of Qiyamah?”

Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said:

“O Abu Hurayrah, I knew you would be the first to ask me about this due to your eagerness for Hadith. The fortunate person who will gain my intercession will be that person who says ‘La ilaha illallah’ sincerely from his heart.”

(Sahih Bukhari, Hadith: 99)



2) Sayyiduna Abu Hurayrah (radiyallahu ‘anhu) reports that Rasulullah (sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said:

“When a person sincerely says ‘La ilaha illallah’, the doors of the sky are opened for it until it reaches the Throne so long as he avoids major sins”

(Sunan Tirmidhi, Hadith: 3590. Graded sound -hasan- by Imam Tirmidhi)



3) Sayyiduna Jabir (radiyallahu ‘anhu) reports that Nabi (sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said:

“The best dhikr is ‘La ilaha illallah, and the best du’a is ‘Alhamdulillah”

(Sunan Tirmidhi, Hadith: 3383, Sunan Ibn Majah, Hadith: 3800, Sahih Ibn Hibban; Al Ihsan, Hadith: 843 and Mustadrak Hakim, vol. 1 pg. 498)

Imam Tirmidhi (rahimahullah) has classified the above Hadith as sound (hasan). Imam Hakim (rahimahullah) has declared the Hadith authentic (sahih) and Hafiz Dhahabi (rahimahullah) concurs with him.



4) Sayyiduna Abu Hurayrah (radiyallahu ‘anhu) reports that Nabi (sallallahu ‘alayhi wa sallam) said:

“Recite ‘La ilaha illallah’ abundantly before you are unable to recite it” (ie. before you become ill/pass away)

(Musnad Abu Ya’la, -Hadith: 6147- with a sound chain. See Targhib, vol. 2 pg. 416 and Majma’uz Zawaid, vol. 10 pg. 82)

And Allah Ta’ala Knows best

Answered by: Moulana Suhail Motala
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#208 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 15:11
abu mohammed wrote:
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I still feel like you're missing my point, but I can't think of a way to phrase it any better.

I understand your point, but I would also point out that those hadith are said between Arabic speakers.
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#209 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 15:16
abu mohammed wrote:
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Again I dont see why you are arguing in favor of reciting without understanding.

Here is a tweet from @Darulfiqh about reciting duas in english. Couldn't the same be said for dhikr until a person understands the phrases?

Quote:

Another dua when waking up

اَلْحَمْدُ لِلَّهِ الَّذِي عَافَانِي فِي جَسَدِي، وَرَدَّ عَلَيَّ رُوحِي، وَأَذِنَ لِي بِذِكْرِهِ.

"All praise is for Allah who restored to me my health and returned my soul and has allowed me to remember Him. [At-Tirmidhi]

One should ponder on the meanings of such duas and not just merely utter them without thought. One may recite them in English if it helps appreciating the meaning and connects one to Allah more.
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#210 [Permalink] Posted on 4th February 2020 15:22
In Need of Teaching wrote:
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No, that's wrong.

You know the words, Allahu Akbar, SubhanAllah, alhumdulillah etc, that is sufficient for now!

My youngest son doesn't know anything but English (orally only) and when he stands for Salah, he says Allahu Akbar and then recites surah Fatiha only, in every single movement and you know what, if Salah was compulsory on him, that would be fine as that's all he knows.
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