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#541 [Permalink] Posted on 3rd November 2019 23:13
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#542 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 01:24
Rajab wrote:
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How is this guy still alive?

Idiot had one too many omelettes himself, May Allah Ta'ala guide him.

I doubt any one will deny this that the people out there with Moulana are the type that will die fighting. They live for Shaaadat.



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#543 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 04:47
I am still confused :(

Why did Maulana go through all that exercise ?

He may be anything, but he is certainly not stupid.
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#544 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 06:33
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Why do they need civilians to run the country. Just finish everything and make Pakistan a military state. Throw away the constitution in the Arabian sea. Introduce a new department in the army whose only job should be to rule the country. Khallas!


This is frustration at the most and hence not a good argument. At the moment very critical operation is in progress where a Maulana has awaken to the fact that Imran Khan's election was a fraud. Strange allegation in face of the stark fact that Imran Khan could not have rigged the elections because he was not the PM or the President. The fact that Maulana's conscience woke up just after an excellent and historical speech in the United Nations General Assembly speaks loads about Maulana's sincerity.

After filtering the Hazrat-vs-Hero dimension the analysis has to be logical, rational and based on reason and on the count the Maulana not only lacks a case but his motives too become suspect - why would a non-elected person become so assertive to overthrow and elected government?
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#545 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 06:46
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Doesn't matter how sincere IK is, he has a rubbish cabinet. FC, MS, SM etc.

Plus I am among those who are arguing from the point of view of a person who has come upon very unpleasant evidence against the Maulana.

In India I have been hearing very unpleasant remarks about Maulavis dabbling in politics but I never gave these allegations credence. These allegations have been against both Barelwi and Deobandi Maulavis.

By now I am not so sure about the purity of so many Maulavis who are active in politics.

With utmost regret I have decided that I shall make up my mind on the case to case basis.

I am not not positive about Maulana Fazl-ur-Rahman Sahab and I am very uncertain about Maulanal Salman Husaini Nadvi Sahab.

Maulana Arshad Madani Sahab and Maulana Mehmood Madani Sahab are walking a very tight rope but I am giving them full benefit of doubt - we are living in very critical times and it is very difficult to move even an inch in the right direction on the Straight Path.

When have have examples of the like of Shaheed Abdur Rashid Ghazi it is clear that we can not be very lenient about others - we are talking about an extremely serious business. It is very difficult to be a Muslim today and to be a leader is plain dangerous.

But even if we do not impose high standards on sacrifice on our leaders than transparency is the least that we can demand. This brings us to the question why Maulana chose to criticize, nay throw over, Imran Khan rather than congratulating him on his historical speech.
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#546 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 08:15
Maulana's march was not out of blue and certainly was not decided after IK's UN speech. If you have been following him, you would know that he has done over a dozen large jalsas in Pakistan in the last 6 months. Moulana has been talking about rigged elections since IK came to power. It wasnt overnight as you are painting it.
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#547 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 09:21
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He might have conducted a hundred meeting after the elections but this is an irrefutable fact that he honoured Imran Khan with a Dharna for his, Imran Khan's, ousting only after the magnificent UN General Assembly speech.

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#548 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 09:43
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It is a very interesting lesson...

Even a genius can be mistaken when he makes opinions based on his likings or disliking rather than the facts on the ground.

Every day in our life brings something new to learn !
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#549 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 09:52

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Pakistanees have an extremely low literacy rate (in both Deen & Dunya) combined with emotional surges which is a dangerous cocktail. I will give you 4 examples:

Maulana Fazlur-Rahman

He was the head of Kashmir committee for 10 years and no (Deobandi) is asking the basic question, "Forget Imran Khan, what did Maulana achieve for Kashmir in 10 years?"

This simple question will demolish Maulana.


Army & Government!


The (Pakistan or any other) Army does not train to govern a country, it trains to fight a war. A 17-18 year boy or girl joins the military to fight, he or she does not join the military to sit in an office and do paperwork. It is depleting, demoralizing and hard for the Army to be in the Government.

A 22 year old second-lieutenant does not want to stand guard duty in Karachi or Lahore or check paperwork from cars at checkpoints.

There is unanimity in the Army from General to a Cadet that they wish to STAY OUT of politics!

The problem is that over the past few decades all civil institutions have been degraded to such an extent that they are useless! A sagging civil society degrades Army's ability to fight wars and do its primary job so they have (wrongly) intervened in the past to keep the country afloat and it has made the situation worse.

Ignorant Pakistanees keep asking the Army to intervene and take over Government when all Army wants is a floating economy to buy (weapons) and prepare for war.

Ignorant Journalists & Youtubers!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nfSP30hBpc

This guy is a rising star Journalist among Pakistani (religiously minded people). This IGNORAMUS is actually proposing Pakistan to start using EVMs because they are so successful in India.

Because the literacy rate in Pakistan is so low and Pakisatnees thrive on their ignorance, they actually want EVMs in Pakistan and think that India has a supremely successful and robust voting system.

This guy is an enlightened "Deobandi Journalist" of Pakistan, just listen to his analysis about voting system.

Orya Maqbool Jan

Another Pakistani "Intellectual" heavyweight which the Deobandees and everybody else just laps up. Listen to his knowledge and comments on Hadeeth, he frequently quotes fabrications in his analysis which forget laymen (Ulama do not comment on).

Here is an entire program of this "intellect" on Hindu Numerology, he is sitting there and participating in Shirk and nobody, forget laymen (Ulama do not comment on this).

www.youtube.com/watch?v=zlT6QVgFaPs

The solution to Pakistan is to BAN EVERYTHING and educate people on basics for a generation. Nothing else but basic education, reading and writing skills. If a nation thinks that it needs EVMs they forfeit their right to comment on anything! Ignorance will lead you to be exploited again and again in the name of "Jewish Invasion of Islamabad etc"


Diversion

Since the solution is hard, the entire nation is infested with conspiracy thinking. There are people in Islamabad right now who came because they thought that Israeli flag will be hoisted by Imran Khan on the Parliament house so they came to defend Islam, the participants with Maulana are actually saying this!

  1. These "Deobandees" think that Imran Khan is a Jewish agent because his sons (from his Ex-wife) live in London. This is doing serious damage to Deen in Pakistan because the "normal people" are just astounded (and disgusted) at this level of ignorance from those who profess to follow the Sunnah. Apostasy is on the rise in Pakistan but due to different reasons then the west. Apostasy is rising because kids who go through a normal schooling system are disgusted (with hate) at these religious people who are simply ignorant!
  2. These "Deobandees" actually are proud to be ignorant! We do not wish to educate ourselves because science is a tool of Shaytaan
  3. In America, I am from the deep south and the Trump loving Christian right are exactly the same. Facts be damned, the whole world is lying to us and we are proud of our ignorance. Listen to this guy say that he believes Trump over Jesus

www.youtube.com/watch?v=t28TXvRPpW8

"Deobandees" actually believe whatever they are fed by Ulama (in Pakistan) over everything else. They actually believe that Isareli flag is about to be hoisted over Islamabad.

It is a sad tragic decline of a Nation.

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#550 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 10:20
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He had.announced about the dharna several months before the speech.
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#551 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 10:27
Anyone who is in position of power must face the heat for his performance whether he is a molvi or an oxford graduate. These highly literate people have made different rules for different people. The lives of 20 crore + awaam is affected by the decisions of PM and his government and not by some Maulana who is not in power. These highly literate people must come here and help improve the literacy rate by building institutions instead of acting Hassan Nisars.
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#552 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 10:28
Mudassir Ramzan interviews Kamila Shamsie in the Hindu Magazine


The Lead : Books : ‘You can’t expect novels to alter history’: Kamila Shamsie
Muddasir Ramzan

November 02, 2019 16:00 IST


Award-winning novelist Kamila Shamsie says that she doesn’t feel optimistic about the future of anyone these days, between rising populism and the horror of climate change

British-Pakistani author Kamila Shamsie hit the headlines recently when the jury for a German literary prize reversed its decision to honour her with the award. The reason cited was Shamsie’s support for a pro-Palestine/ anti-Israel movement. Several authors (Noam Chomsky, J.M. Coetzee, William Dalrymple, Jeanette Winterson, Ben Okri, among them) expressed outrage over this in an open letter published in the London Review of Books.

In this interview, Shamsie talks of her position as a writer, her last novel, Home Fire (2017), and about difficulties of representation. Excerpts:

How do you define yourself — as a diaspora writer, a transnational/ international writer, Muslim writer, or something else?

I don’t really. When you’re writing you don’t think of labels. At various times, depending on context, I have talked about myself as a Pakistani writer, a woman writer, a Muslim writer, a British-Pakistani writer. The words that don’t have any resonance for me are ‘transnational/ international’ and ‘diaspora’.

Do you think writing is a responsibility? Do you feel accountable for representing your community?

I’ve wanted to write since I was 11 — responsibility doesn’t enter the picture at that age. It’s about love. Of course, I am responsible to my subjects and my material and to the novel form. But I go where the story takes me rather than where I feel I should go because of some external sense of responsibility. And no, I don’t feel accountable for representing any community. But I am aware of the stereotypes that exist about some of the people I write about, and I know that a good novel in its complexity and nuance will write against stereotype.

How is it to be a writer of a community which is seen as the ‘other’ in this world? Are you conscious of the stereotypes of Muslims while you write?

What do you mean by ‘this world’? Muslims aren’t seen as the other in Pakistan, which is one of the countries where I have readers. I don’t assume a particular kind of reader or attitude. I have to write novels that will work for those who are Muslim and for those to whom Muslims are the ‘other.’

I meant this contemporary world where Muslims are pigeonholed. What prompted you to write a book (Home Fire) involving the ISIS, Britain, and Muslims? Would you have done so without the Antigone frame?

Antigone came first and the story of Home Fire followed, so I don’t know whether I would have done it without Antigone.

What prompted me to write it was reading Antigone and thinking of all the ways in which it echoed stories in the headlines about young Britons joining the ISIS, their families left behind, and the government’s response.

Home Fire is a retelling of Antigone, but you have made it your own. How much of Antigone is still present in Home Fire?

It’s hard for me to answer that. Sometimes I see it very clearly. Other times it disappears and I only see the characters I wrote. When I was working on the novel I had to push Antigone to the back of my brain, so I wasn’t so conscious of it but it was still present.

Home Fire opens with Isma being interrogated at Heathrow. Did you have similar experiences? Have you ever felt threatened about your identity post 9/11?

Not like Isma, but for a number of years after 9/11, I was routinely sent to the secondary interrogation room at American airports. Nothing unpleasant ever happened, but as I sat in the room waiting to be called up I would imagine all kinds of unpleasant scenarios. It was impossible not to feel myself Muslim and Pakistani and therefore possibly suspect.

Have events like the Rushdie affair and 9/11 affected you as a writer?

Everything that happens in the world that I’m aware of and that makes me see things differently affects me as a writer, so, yes. I was only 16 at the time of the Rushdie affair but 9/11 happened at a point when I was living part of my life in America, part in England and part in Pakistan — it was impossible not to be aware of how different histories were colliding and what suspicions were arising. That made its way into Burnt Shadows and continues on in Home Fire.

Do you feel optimistic about the future of Muslims?

I’m afraid I don’t feel optimistic about the future of anyone these days, between rising populism and the horror of climate change.

How far do you think is Home Fire relevant to our times? Do you believe writing can bring changes in the perception of people about Muslims?

I don’t think you can expect novels to alter history. They don’t do that. They make some people think differently — that’s as much as you can claim.

In Home Fire, Aneeka coins the acronym GWM (Googling While Muslim) to connote the vulnerability of being a Muslim in this age of surveillance and Islamophobia. As a writer, you need to investigate things which could prove to be harmful: how do you deal with it?

I was very careful about the things I was looking at — both because I didn’t want to pollute my mind with the ISIS’s barbaric videos and because I was very conscious of GWM. So it was useful to be able to use the work of researchers who had looked at all the websites and Twitter accounts that I felt nervous about.

How do you form perceptions about things you don’t much about?

You read, you watch, you think, you write. And when you enter the minds of characters who think unlike you, you discover the most about perception and how limited it can be.

Do you have a feeling that there aren’t many Muslim voices present?

If you mean in ‘the West’ then yes, there are very few Muslim voices amidst all the talk about Muslims.

Your novels narrate the realities faced by Muslims. However, do you think there is politics involved in the representation of Muslims?

I think there’s politics involved in all representation. You decide which stories and points of view to tell — that’s extremely political.

Isma’s supervisor is a Kashmiri-American (Dr. Hira Shah, who had been educated at a convent school in Kashmir). Does it echo your relationship with Agha Shahid Ali? As a Kashmiri, I would be interested in knowing more about this poet-teacher.

It doesn’t echo the relationship as such but by making her Kashmiri and giving her the name, Shah (which I thought of as an abbreviated Shahid), I was paying private homage to my mentor and friend. Hira Shah isn’t at all like Shahid, except in one important detail — her house becomes a place of welcome and food and conversations for Isma, and Shahid’s house very much functioned that way for me when I was in graduate school.

I knew him from my days as an undergraduate in Hamilton College, took my first writing class with him, and he was a good part of the reason I ended up at UMass Amherst (University of Massachusetts at Amherst), where he had started to teach when I was still at Hamilton.

You have been placing your homeland, Karachi, somehow in your novels. Do you think you will be writing about Kashmir some time?

I don’t know where my novels will go in the future. Certainly the world needs to hear stories of Kashmir, but I know the best of those stories have come from, and will come from, Kashmiris.

The Nelly Sachs Prize was withdrawn over your support for the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement against Israel. What do you think of political censorship?

Obviously, I’m not a fan. And I think the demonising of BDS, which is a peaceful movement asking for international law to be upheld, is an outrage.

More than 250 writers defended you...

It was heartening to see the number of writers willing to put their name to that letter.

You have emerged as a voice for the under-represented people of the world — are you happy with your role as a writer?

I’m happy that I get to be a writer, which is what I’ve wanted to do all my life. But every writer wants to be a better writer than they are, and I’m not an exception.

I certainly don’t see myself as a voice for the under-represented people of the world, but I’m always touched when people say that I have told stories that echo their lives and which they too rarely see represented in fiction.

Do you have any suggestions for writers?

My great-aunt, Attia Hossain, told me when I was a child “Whatever happens, don’t stop writing. Writing is a muscle and if you don’t use it, you’ll lose it.” That remains the best advice I’ve ever received.

The interviewer researches contemporary Muslim fiction in the Department of English, Aligarh Muslim University.
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#553 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 10:34
I do not have the time to render above interview in a readable format.

In this interview for the first time we get a glimpse of how a Muslim writer is scared to browse the internet.
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#554 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 10:34
sipraomer wrote:
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May I have the link please.

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#555 [Permalink] Posted on 4th November 2019 10:46
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