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10
Jul
2012

Zaynab R.A

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 10th July 2012 - 0 comments
ZAYNAB (r.a) – DAUGHTER OF MUHAMMAD (صلى الله عليه وسلم)
Zaynab (R.A.) was the eldest of the four daughters of Rasulullah (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam). Zaynab (R.A.) was married to Abdul As ibn Rabi, who was also the first cousin of Zaynab (R.A.), son of Khadija’s (R.A.) sister Hala. After Prophethood her husband did not accept Islãm and the leaders of his clan put great pressure upon him to divorce her and in return promised him to arrange the bride of his choice. But he didn’t.

Later Zaynab (R.A.) went to Madinah with other emigrants. Abdul As let her go with a heavy heart. The news of her journey leaked and some miscreants of the Quraysh followed them to bring her back. One of them, Habbãr by name, galloped ahead brandishing his spear. Zaynab (R.A.) was troubled much by his arrival. The camel, she was mounted on was startled and she fell down from her howdah (carriage). She was expecting her third child and later she had a miscarriage.

Not long after Hijrah, Abdul As came to Madinah and embraced Islãm. His wife Zaynab (R.A.) ever praying to Allah that He may turn his heart to Islãm owing to the deep love between the spouses, was grateful to Allah. The Prophet (Sallallahu Alaihi Wasallam) allowed his daughter Zaynab (R.A.) to reinstate the suspended bond of marriage.
source: Attarbiyah Magazine
7
Jul
2012

The Best Family Man

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 7th July 2012 - 0 comments
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=zKfkv-zZJgU

by Mufti Hussain Kamani
Please share/ like in order to spread to others.
3
Jul
2012

Manners For Young Children

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 3rd July 2012 - 0 comments
1. Teach children to use the right hand for eating, drinking, giving and taking. To eat and drink while sitting, and to stay, ‘Bismillah’ before eating and, ‘Alhamdulillah’ after finishing. 2. Teach children hygienic etiquette, to clip fingernails and toe nails, and to wash hands before and after eating. 3. Teach them how to clean themselves after using the toilet and how to keep urine off their clothes. 4. Correct their mistakes kindly and privately without scolding them. 5. Instruct them to listen to the Adhaan quietely and repeat the words of Adhaan after the Muadhin, then to ask Allah to exalt the mention of the Prophet [sallallaahu alayhi wasallam] and supplicate the following,
22
Jun
2012

Virtues of attending Jumuah Salaah

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 22nd June 2012 - 0 comments
Some virtues of attending the Jumu’ah prayer Abu Hurairah (RA) narrates that Nabi (SAW) said, ‘The sins are remitted between the five prayers, one Jumu’ah Salaah to another Jumu’ah Salaah and Ramadhaan to Ramadhaan as long as no major sins are committed.’ (Muslim) Abu Hurairah (RA) said that Nabi (SAW) said, ‘Whoever makes a perfect Wudhu, then attends the Jumu’ah proceedings, listens attentively to the sermon delivered and observes total silence, he will be pardoned until the next Jumu’ah Salaah, along with an additional three days.’ (Muslim) Abdullah bin ‘Amr bin Al-‘Aas narrates that Nabi (SAW) said, ‘There are three categories of people. One category goes to the Jumu’ah prayer and engages in frivolous activities. That will be their share. Another goes to the Jumu’ah prayer and supplicates to Allah. If Allah decides, he will be granted or not granted what he asks for. Another goes to the Jumu’ah prayer and observes total silence, he does not obstruct the gathering by jumping over them, and he does not harm anyone. He will be forgiven until the following Jumu’ah along with three extra days. This is because Allah says, ‘Whoever does a good deed, it will be multiplied ten times.’ (Abu Dawood, Ibne Khuzaimah) Abu Moosa Al-Ash’ari (RA) narrates that Nabi (SAW) said, ‘The days of the week will be brought forward on the day of Reckoning in their original forms and the day of Jumu’ah will come in the form of a brilliant rose. Those people who observed the sanctity of this day will surround it as the bridegroom is surrounded when she is being taken to her private quarters. It will illuminate for them so that they are able to walk in its light. They will be white as ice in colour. They will small like musk. They will be plunging in mountains of Kaafoor. The creation will be looking at them. They will not be looking around out of astonishment until they enter Paradise. Only those (sincere) Mu’azzins (the one who calls the Azaan) who only seek the reward of Allah will mix with them.’ (Ibne Khuzaimah)
17
Jun
2012

Shaykh Mufti Muhammad ibn Adam al-Kawthari

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 17th June 2012 - 0 comments
Short Biography Shaykh Mufti Muhammad ibn Adam al-Kawthari is a traditionally-trained Islamic scholar who has studied the Arabic language and various other traditional Islamic sciences including Qur’anic exegesis (tafsir), Hadith and Fiqh in different parts of the world including the UK, Pakistan and Syria. His Shuyukh/teachers include his father, Shaykh Mawlana Adam, Shaykh Yusuf Motala, Shaykh Mufti Muhammad Taqi Usmani, Shaykh Abd al-Razzaq al-Halabi and others. He has received authorizations (ijazahs) in various Islamic disciplines including the six major collections of Hadith and the science of issuing religious verdicts (Fatwa). His authored works include: Islamic Guide to Sexual Relations, Birth Control & Abortion in Islam, The Issue of Shares and Simplified Rules of Zakat, and is widely known for providing answers to people’s everyday issues and comprehensive fiqh related articles; which can be found at his website www.daruliftaa.com. The Shaykh has taught many courses and lectured extensively on a range of topics, and continues to travel regularly teaching and lecturing both in the UK and abroad. Presently, he resides in Leicester, UK, where he is a teacher of various traditional Islamic sciences, and Director and researcher at the Institute of Islamic Jurisprudence (Darul Iftaa, www.daruliftaa.com). Detailed Biography
9
Jun
2012

Mufti Ismail Musa Menk

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 9th June 2012 - 0 comments
About Mufti Menk Ismail Musa Menk was born in Harare, Zimbabwe. He was tutored by his father who is a well known scholar and Da'ee. He completed his hifz and recitation courses at an early age and learnt the Arabic and Urdu languages whilst studying Shariah under his father. At the same time he attended an Academic College in Harare where he completed his secondary secular education. He then attained a degree in Shariah from the University of Madinah and later specialised in Iftaa at Darul Uloom Kantharia in Gujarat. He is a broad minded, motivational speaker who has won the hearts of many. He teaches at the Darul Ilm in Harare and finds the time to attend many international religious conferences, seminars etc.
5
Jun
2012

using mobile phones

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 5th June 2012 - 0 comments
Etiquettes of the Mobile Phone Islam has never been opposed to advancement. However, certain advancements are such that together with their benefits come much harm. Whilst mobile technology and the mobile phone in particular has revolutionised the way we live, it is important that we utilise such technology appropriately. Crude Manners It is important to realise that there are certain etiquettes of speaking on the phone. For example when calling someone, many people do not first ask the person they are calling whether it is convenient for them to speak at that very moment. They simply begin a long conversation without any regard for the inconvenience they cause the person they have called. There are yet others who, whilst in the company of others, answer phone calls and begin to casually converse with whoever has called them. Doing this is akin to turning your face away from those in your company whilst in the middle of a conversation and engaging in conversation with someone else without any explanation or apology to the first. Such behaviour is indeed inappropriate and a reflection of crude manners. Robber of Time The mobile phone, whilst being a very useful item, can prove to be a robber of time too. People feel obliged to utilise the free minutes and texts they have within their contract. If one has an allowance of 500 minutes or 500 texts within his talk plan, it is not necessary to utilise all these minutes or texts. By calling people or texting them only to use up the allowance, we are wasting valuable time which could have been utilised in productive activities. Text Messages
4
Jun
2012

Imam Nawawi

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 4th June 2012 - 0 comments
IMAM NAWAWI [631 - 676 A.H] Birth and Birth place: The complete name of Imam Nawawi is Abu Zakaria Mohiuddin Yahya, son of Sharaf An-Nawawi, son of Murry, son of Hassan, son of Hussain, son of Muhammad, son of Juma, son of Hazam. Nawawi refers to Nawa, a place near Damascus, in the suburb of the city of Howran. One of his ancestors named Hazam had settled at this place. Imam Nawawi was born at Nawa in the year 631 A.H. His father, a virtuous and pious man, resolved to arrange for proper and befitting education as he had discovered the symptoms of heavenly intelligence and wisdom in his promising child at an early stage. Shaikh Yasin bin Yousuf Marakashi, a saintly figure of Nawa says: “I saw Imam Nawawi at Nawa when he was a youth of ten years of age. Other boys of his age used to force him to play with them, but Imam Nawawi would always avoid the play and would remain busy with the recitation of the Noble Qur’an. When they tried to domineer and insisted on his joining their games, he bewailed and expressed his no concern over their foolish action. On observing his sagacity and profundity, a special love and affection developed in my heart for young Nawawi. I approached his teacher and urged him to take exceptional care of this lad as he was to become a great religious scholar and most pious saint of future. His teacher asked whether I was a soothsayer or an astrologer. I told him I am neither soothsayer nor an astrologer but Allah caused me to utter these words.” His teacher conveyed this incident to Imam’s father and he keeping in view the learning quest of his son, decided to dedicate the life of his son for the service and promotion of the cause of Islamic Faith. In a short period, Nawawi learnt to read the Holy Qur’an and by that time he nearly had attained puberty. Nawa had no academic or scholarly atmosphere and there were no religious academies or institutes where one could earn excellence in religious learning, so his father took him to Damascus, which was considered the center of learning and scholarship, and the students from far and wide gathered there for schooling. During that period, there were more than three hundred institutes, colleges and universities in Damascus. Imam Nawawi joined Madrasah Rawahiyah which was affiliated with the Ummvi University. The founder and patron of this Madrasah was a trader named Zakiuddin Abul-Qassim who was known as Ibn Rawahah. Madrasah was named after him. Noted and eminent teachers of the period taught in that Madrasah. Imam Nawawi says, “I studied in this institution for two years. During my stay in Madrasah Rawahiyah, I never had complete rest and lived on the limited food supplied by the institution.” As a routine he used to sleep very little at night. When it became irresistible as a human being, he would lean and slumber for a while against the support of books. After a short duration he would again be hard at his scholastic pursuits.
30
May
2012

Meeting another muslim with a cheerful countenance

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 30th May 2012 - 0 comments
When one Muslim meets another he should confront him with a smile and cheerful countenance and physically express his delight in meeting him. This will entail a fortification of love and affection between them. If you confront a grieved person with a cheerful countenance, you might just allay his grief or at least pacify him. A person feels unrestrained in expressing himself if he is confronted cheerfully thereby aiding him in fulfilling his needs. Hadhrat Abu Dhar (رضى الله تعالى عنه) narrates that the Holy Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: “Don’t ever belittle any of your good deeds even though this may be meeting your brother with a cheerful countenance.” [Muslim] The Holy Prophet (صلى الله عليه وسلم) said: “When two Muslims meets and clasp each others hands, their sins are shed as a tree sheds it’s leaves.” Together with a buoyant confrontation, clasping each others hands is also mustahab (preferable) as this increases mutual love and affection.
30
May
2012

Shah Walli-u Allah

posted by sweetmuslimahk1 on 30th May 2012 - 0 comments
Shah Wali-u Allah was born on 4th Shawwaal, 1114 / 21 February 1703 1703 at Phulat in Delhi. His ancestors had migrated from Arabia to Iran for reasons not known. Later on when the invasion of the Tatars caused widely spread terror and destruction in Iraq and Iran, the forefathers of the Shah are said to have migrated to India and found their settlement here at Rohtak village. His grandfather was a gallant soldier in the Mughal army and a deep lover of the Qur’aan. Shaykh Abdur-Rahim was Shah Wali-u Allah’s father, the pupil of a great scholar and sufi – Zahid Herawi. Abdur-Rahim was famous for his profound knowledge of the traditions and Islamic jurisprudence. That is why he was offered the service in the government to revise Fataawa Alamgiri which he undertook at the instance of his mother. He was also famous for found his seminary, Madrasah-e-Rahimiyyah in Delhi the forerunner of the present Darul Uloom Deoband. Shaykh Abdur-Rahim had interests in mysticism yet he did not ignore the practical aspects of life. In the home of such a pious and learned father, the Shah grew up to great heights of eminence. At the age of five, the Shah had his first lesson at school. After two years he learnt reading and writing. He learnt the Qur’aan by heart upto the age of ten. At the age of fourteen years he read a part of Bauzayi and the major part of Mishkawah. He got the graduation from Rahimiyyah college at the age of fifteen. The prescribed syllabus of the college laid great stress on the Qur’aanic studies with lesser aid from commentaries and the Shah himself felt thankful to God for being provided with opportunity to lecture on the lessons of the Qur’aan which opened the doors of its knowledge for him. The other sciences like the Hadith, Fiqh, logic, etc. were also learnt by the Shah. He became the teacher of this very college of his father at the age of seventeen. Only two years later, his father died and the management work of the school fell upon him. The Shah took up the task with devotion and attained the help of the old graduates of the college. He prepared his lectures after extensive study on various Islamic disciplines and sciences. and provided guidance on the problems of varied nature. While sitting on the grave of his father in pious meditation, he sought solutions of the spiritual problems. ‘When I sat meditating,’ he reports, ‘at the grave of my father, problems of Tawhid (oneness of God) were solved. The path of the divine attraction (Jazb) was opened; and a large share of Saluk (spiritual journey) fall to my lot, and inspirational knowledge (Uloom-e-Wajdaniyyah) thronged the mind with it.’ Through his study of standard Fiqh literature and Hadith books, the Shah came to the conclusion that the institution of Fuqaha-e-Muhadditheen (jurisprudents who drew heavily upon traditions of the Prophet Muhammad (Sallallaahu Alayhi Wasallam) was an adequate one that he would adhere to in his future life. Shah Wali-u Allah’s journey to Hijaaz in October 24 1730 / 8 Rabi-as-Thaani 1143 proved a turning point in his career. It was the time when the Indian subcontinent was undergoing a deep crisis consequent upon the declining fortunes of the Mughal empire. Under such conditions there was growing an indifference towards religion. The sectarian conflicts had become the order of the day. Sufism had generated and various evils had crept into the society as a result of the practices of the false Sufis. The sensitive mind of the Shah was deeply moved by the deplorable situation prevailing in India and his journey to Hijaaz had much to do with this preoccupation of the scholar. In Hijaaz, the Shah stayed for about two years, performed Hajj twice at Makkah and also spent sometime at the Prophet’s tomb in Madinah. Besides acquainting himself with the general condition of the Muslim world during his stay in Hijaaz, the Shah also received lessons on the Qur’aan and the Hadith and thereby was able to attain considerable guidance in the spiritual matters. He read from the scholars of repute, Muatta of Imaam Maalik with Shaykh Wafadullah and Bukhari of Imaam Bukhari with Shaykh Taj-al-Din Hanafi, the Mufti (juri consultant) of Makkah. At Madinah, the Shah attended to Shaykh Ibrahim Kurdi, an eminent traditionist and sufi, and revised all famous books on Hadith under his guidance. Shaykh Abu Tahir, another great theologian in Madinah, also guided the Shah in the science of Hadith. It can hardly be denied that Shah Shah Wali-u Allah’s sojourn to Hijaaz proved to be a landmark in his spiritual development. He himself mentions many spiritual blessings and experiences in His Fuyuz al-Haramayn. He received them in a series of visions at the precincts of the holy Ka’abah and the holy tomb of Rasulullah (Sallallaahu Alayhi Wasallam). In these visions include the task of the revival of Islam entrusted to the Shah by the grandsons of the prophet, the intelligibility of the most controversial problems of ontological versus phenomenological monism, clearance of doubts on the controversial issues relating to solidarity and development of the Muslim institutions. A.D. Muztar has eloquently described this enlightenment of Shah Wali-u Allah in the following words: The prophet cleared his doubts concerning them in a series of visions. For example, the prophet (Sallallaahu Alayhi Wasallam) told Shah Wali-u Allah.
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