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29
Oct
2014

The Meaning of the Words 'Hadeeth', 'Khabar' and 'Athar'

posted by Seifeddine-M on 29th October 2014 - 1 comment

Hadeeth [حديث] Lexically speaking, the word "hadeeth" [حديث], whose plural is ahaadeeth [أحاديث], is, "New, recent... existing newly, for the first time, not having been before... Information, a piece of information, intelligence, an announcement... a thing, or matter, that is talked of, told, or narrated..." [1] In both the Qur'aan and hadeeth, the word has been used in reference to a religious communication, a story of a general nature, a historical story and a current story or conversation. [2]

28
Oct
2014

Definition of the Word Sunnah As Used by the Specialists in 'Aqeedah

posted by Seifeddine-M on 28th October 2014 - 0 comments

By the third Hijri century, the specialists in the field of 'aqeedah (dogma, creed and faith) used the term "sunnah" to refer to the foundations of the faith, the well-established obligatory deeds, the matters of creed and the definitive rulings of Islaam. This terminology became popular as more and more sects appeared. [1] Some scholars would use the term "sunnah" to refer to the established articles of faith and to distinguish them from the beliefs of the newly-formed heretical groups. [2] Imaam Ibn Rajab al-Hanbali رحمه الله noted, "Many of the later scholars [meaning after the first couple of generations] used the word 'sunnah' to specifically refer to what is related to creed, because that forms the foundation of the religion and the one who contradicts it is in a very dangerous situation." [3]

27
Oct
2014

The Jurists' and the Legal Theorists' Usage of the Term "Sunnah"

posted by Seifeddine-M on 27th October 2014 - 0 comments
Examples Illustrating the Difference Between the Jurists' and the Legal Theorists' Usage of the Term "Sunnah"

One of the major reasons for confusion about the status of the Sunnah is a failure to distinguish between the word sunnah as used in its different contexts and disciplines. In particular, the usage of the jurists has led many to believe that, as some have explicitly said, "Whatever comes from the Qur'aan must be applied. If one also applies the Sunnah, that is good but is not mandatory." Some have also expressed that only the Qur'aan can establish something as obligatory and the sunnah can only establish something as recommended. It is important, therefore, to give some examples that may remove this misunderstanding.

27
Oct
2014

Definition of the Word Sunnah as Used in Islamic Legal Theory

posted by Seifeddine-M on 27th October 2014 - 0 comments

One of the goals of the Islamic legal theorists is to determine what is or is not an authority in Islamic law. They are not concerned with the details of the actual law but they are concerned with the sources and methodology of that law. When they define the word Sunnah, they are defining it from that perspective. Therefore, when it comes to the reports that have been narrated about or from the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم, they try to distinguish what is an authority and what is an example for the Muslims to follow from that which does not fall into that category. Their definition will definitely differ from that of the scholars of hadeeth, being much less broad in scope. Perhaps the most common definition given for the Sunnah from Islamic legal theory perspective is: Whatever comes from the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم, other than the Qur'aan itself, in the form of his speech, actions or tacit approvals. His speech includes what he commanded, recommended, permitted, disapproved or forbade. The Prophet's صلى الله عليه وسلم actions are considered an authority in Islamic law because the Muslims have been ordered to take him as their example. His tacit approvals are considered an authority in Islamic law because it would be right for the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم to remain silent in the presence of something wrong; hence, his silence implies his approval while his approval implies that the act is correct according to the Sharee'ah. In this definition, the legal theorists have obviously excluded the Qur'aan from part of the definition - but the definition is inclusive of hadeeth qudsi. [1]

27
Oct
2014

Definition Of The Word Sunnah As Used By The Scholars Of Hadeeth

posted by Seifeddine-M on 27th October 2014 - 0 comments

The topic of study for the scholars of hadeeth is everything that has been narrated or reported concerning the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم. They desire to gather all of that information to determine what of it is sound and acceptable and to distinguish that from what has been narrated through unstrustworthy or unacceptable means. Hence, first and foremost, they concentrate on anything narrated about or from the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم. All of the information about the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم that one could imagine was passed on and recorded in detail, the extent of which is not comparable to anyone in the history of mankind. The purpose of study or goal of the scholars of hadeeth has greatly affected their technical definition of the word "sunnah." Indeed, their definition of the word sunnah is the broadest of all definitions, trying to encompass everything that was passed on concerning the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم. In general, the definition of "sunnah" from the scholars of hadeeth perspective is: "What has been passed down from the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم of his statements, actions, tacit approvals, manners, physical characteristics or biography, regardless of whether it was before he was sent as a prophet or afterwards." [1]

27
Oct
2014

Definition Of The Word Sunnah As Used By The Jurists

posted by Seifeddine-M on 27th October 2014 - 0 comments

Among all the different disciplines discussed here, the way the jurists use the word Sunnah is closest to its lexical definition. This usage, meaning "a praiseworthy way of action," has actually turned out to be a source of confusion concerning the status and importance of the sunnah. [1] Jurists, for the most part, are concerned with the rulings of particular actions. In general, an act may be classified into one of five categories: obligatory, recommended, permissible, reprehensible or forbidden. In addition, an act may be sound and valid or it may be void and non-effective. The scholars use a myriad of terms to describe the category of recommended acts. These terms included mandoob مندوب, mustahabb مستحبّ, and so on. In some cases, each term has a slightly different connotation. [2] However, without a doubt, one of the most common terms used for that category is the word "sunnah." Therefore, for example, the jurists will say that the two rak'atayn before the the obligatory Fajr (Dawn) prayer are "sunnah." This means that they are not obligatory. Yet they carry a certain status or reward for them such that they are definitely more than merely permissible. [3]

27
Oct
2014

Meaning and Lexical Definition of the Word 'Sunnah'

posted by Seifeddine-M on 27th October 2014 - 0 comments
Meanings Of The Word "Sunnah"

When used in its most general and common sense, the word Sunnah is a reference to the overall teachings and way of life of the Prophet Muhammad صلى الله عليه وسلم. However, to be more precise, the word Sunnah is used by different types of scholars to connote very different concepts. [1] This is because the purpose and goals of the various disciplines are different. In particular, one needs to differentiate the meaning of the word as it is used in general parlance and how it is used as a technical term by specialists in 'aqeedah (creed and beliefs), jurisprudence, Islamic legal theory and the scholars of Hadeeth.

 

Lexical Definition Of The Word Sunnah
22
Oct
2014

Hadith Qudsi

posted by Seifeddine-M on 22nd October 2014 - 0 comments

Qudsi hadith are those hadith that the Messenger of Allah صلى الله عليه وسلم related from Allah سبحانه و تعالى. Mullah Ali al-Qaari رحمه الله has given the following excellent definition for hadith qudsi. He wrote, "It is that which is related by the foremost of relaters and the most reliable of authorities, the best of blessings and salutations be upon him, from Allah, may He be glorified, sometimes through the medium of Gabriel, upon whom be blessings and peace, and sometimes by revelation, inspiration and dreams. Allah having entrusted to him the expressing of it in such words as he wished. It differs from the Quran in that the revelation of the latter was only through the medium of the Upright Soul [Gabriel] and is restricted to the wording specifically revealed from the Preserved Tablet." [1] Such hadith usually take one of the following forms: (1) Some begin with, "The Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم says from among the sayings he related from his Lord..."

8
Aug
2014

Stick to my Sunnah and the Sunnah of the Khulafa Rashideen (RA)

posted by Seifeddine-M on 8th August 2014 - 0 comments

The Messenger of Allaah صلى الله عليه وسلم said, "Certainly, the one who will live among you will see lots of differences. So stick to my sunnah and the sunnah of the right-principled and rightly-guided successors. Bite onto that with your molar teeth." [1] The Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم mentioned his own sunnah and then mentioned the sunnah of his rightly-guided successors رضي الله عنهم. These successors are called raashideen because they know the truth and they judge or act in accordance with it. Raashid (راشد) is the opposite of ghaawa (غاوى). Ghaawa implies recognizing the truth but not following it. The Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم also described them as mahdiyeen (المهديّين). This means that Allah has guided them to the truth and has not led them astray from it. This is the opposite of dhaal (ضال) or one who is astray from the truth and does not know the truth. For these successors to be true examples for others to follow, it is a must that they had to have recognized the truth, were guided and followed it. Otherwise, they are not worthy of being followed.

7
Aug
2014

Be in the World As If You Were a Stranger or a Traveler Along a Path

posted by Seifeddine-M on 7th August 2014 - 1 comment

The Messenger of Allaah صلى الله عليه وسلم said, "Be in the world as if you were a stranger or a traveler along a path." [1] This hadith shows that a believer should have one of two attitudes toward this world. The first is that of a stranger in a strange land. He feels that he is in a place where he does not belong. This is not his home and he cannot feel entirely happy here. His heart can never be tied to this land. Instead, his heart and mind are preoccupied with getting back to his home. His time and his efforts are filled with that purpose. He is spending his time, money and capabilities to gather together what he needs to return to his home. His time is not spent or wasted on entrenching himself deeply in this environment to which he knows that he does not belong.

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