Create an account
Most Reputable Members

Suitable for Vegetarians but not Muslims and Vice Versa

You have contributed 11.1% of this topic

Thread Tools
Post New Topic Reply Filter by poster  
Topic Appreciation
Appreciate
The following members appreciate this topic: Taalibah, abu mohammed, sweetmuslimahk1, Yasin, Acacia, kanzoorbhai, muslim11, Black Turban, ibn Ismail
2 guests appreciate this topic.
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#1 [Permalink] Posted on 16th February 2012 16:15
report post quote code quick quote reply
Like x 1
Site Support
Please DONATE generously towards Muftisays

We spend hundreds of hours ensuring you receive a quality service from this site. We do not fall into the advertisement schemes as all the ads contain elements of Haraam including Haraam Islamic links. Please consider setting up a £1 monthly donation. May Allah (swt) reward you.

abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#2 [Permalink] Posted on 16th February 2012 16:23
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#3 [Permalink] Posted on 16th February 2012 16:25

Key to the colour-coded table below:

 

Definitely of animal origin
Possibly of animal origin

Red background indicates additives which are always derived from animals. Those in grey boxes are additives, which could be made from either animal or vegetable origins; in which case the grey area additives should be treated with caution. Some of the grey area additives also give an indicator that they may be unsuitable for vegans.
If a food or beauty product is not clearly labelled get in touch with them and ask questions - make a fuss!

 

E Number Additive Name

120

Cochineal, Carminic acid, Carmines Natural Red 4 - colouring

A colouring that makes many foods red. Found in alcoholic drinks, fruit pie fillings, jams, many sweets and even cheeses. Cochineal is made from the female insect found on cacti called Dactylopius Coccus. She is boiled alive or left to "cook" alive through sun exposure. Cochineal is the result of crushing scales of the insect into a red powder.

153

Carbon Black, Vegetable Carbons - colouring

If the description on product packaging says "Vegetable Carbons", then it is most likely free of animal derivatives. (but could be derived from GM crops!) But if the additive is described as "Carbon Black", it 's more likely to be derived from various parts of animals.

161g

Canthaxanthin (Natural Orange Colour Xanthophylls) - colouring.

Be aware that although Canthaxanthin is usually derived from plant material, it can sometimes be made from fish and invertebrates with hard shells.

252

Potassium Nitrate (Saltpetre) - Preservative

Saltpetre is usually assumed to be of natural origins but it can be artificially manufactured from waste animal matter. Potassium nitrate is often found in smoked type cheeses - so even if the cheese contains vegetable rennet and not animal rennet, it may contain potassium nitrate made from animal waste, so check with the cheese manufacturer to determine the source of the potassium nitrate.

270

Lactic Acid - Antioxidant

Can be obtained from whey so Vegan's should determine the source of the ingredient by contacting manufacturers. Lactic Acid can be found in carbonated drinks, beer, dressings and various tinned products.

322

Lecithins - Emulsifier and Stabilizer

Some Lecithin contains egg yolks so not suitable for Vegans. Other main sources of Lecithin are from soya bean oil and is likely to be genetically modified (if sourced from countries such as the US) Lecithin can also be directly obtained from animal fat.

325

Sodium Lactate - Antioxidant

Sodium Lactate is the salt of Lactic Acid. (see E270 above)

326

Potassium Lactate - Antioxidant / Acidity Regulator

Another type of salt derived from Lactic Acid. (see E270 above)

327

Calcium Lactate - Antioxidant

Another type of salt derived from Lactic Acid. (see E270 above)

422

Glycerol (Humectant, Solvent, Sweet Glycerin) - Sweetener

There is contention surrounding the origins of Glycerol. Through various industrial reselling practices, a majority of glycerine originates as a by-product of soap manufacturing. Many soaps are manufactured using animal fats. This indicates that even though glycerine occurs naturally in plants, what ends up in food and soap products mostly originates from animals.

430 - 436

Polyoxyethylene - Emulsifiers and Stabilisers

E numbers 430 to 436 are various types of polyoxyethlene:

E430 Polyoxyethylene (8) stearate (Emulsifier / Stabiliser)
E431 Polyoxyethylene (40) stearate (Emulsifier)
E432 Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monolaurate (polysorbate 20 Emulsifier)
E433 Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate (polysorbate 80 Emulsifier)
E434 Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monopalmitate (polysorbate 40 Emulsifier)
E435 Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monostearate (polysorbate 60 Emulsifier)
E436 Polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan tristearate (polysorbate 65 Emulsifier)

These additives are very unlikely to originate from animals as they are normally derived from various types of fruit. It may still be worth checking with manufactures as to the exact origins of the ingredients which make up these Emulsifiers and stabilisers.

441

Gelatine - Emulsifier / Gelling Agent

You may not find this E number 441 on food ingredients listings anymore because instead of an additive, Gelatine has now been classed as food (made of animal skin and hoofs) in it's own right. Remember, all types of gelatine are animal based and can be found in dairy products like yoghurts, plus many kinds of confectionery, jellies and other sweets.

442

Ammonium phosphatides - Emulsifier

Amonium phosphatides can sometimes be made using Glycerol (see 422 above) Therefore the finished additive may contain animal fat.

470a

Sodium, potassium and calcium salts of fatty acids - Emulsifier / Anti-caking Agent

As 470 is derived from fatty acids, these may originate from animal sources.

470b

Magnesium Stearate - Emulsifier / Anti-caking Agent

This is another magnesium salt from fatty acids and like 470a, may originate from animal sources.

471

Mono- and Diglycerides of fatty acids (glyceryl monostearate, glyceryl distearate) - Emulsifier

Because E471 is derived from Glycerine (Glycerol) (see E422 above), there may be a slim chance that E471 might contain animal fats.

472 a - f

E472 A to F are emulsifiers related to the mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids family:

E472a Acetic acid esters
E472b Lactic acid esters
E472c Citric acid esters
E472d Tartaric acid esters
E472e Mono- and diacetyl tartaric acid esters
E472f Mixed acetic and tartaric acid esters

Because the E472 family is derived from Glycerine (Glycerol) (see E422 above), there may be a slim chance that any of these might contain animal fats.

 

473

Sucrose esters of fatty acids - Emulsifier

E473 is a sucrose ester of E471, being fatty acids, which may be derived from animals.

474

Sucroglyceride - Emulsifier

E474 is a glyceride of sucrose ester of E471, being fatty acids, which may be derived from animals.

475

Polyglycerol esters of fatty acids - Emulsifier

Being an ester of fatty acids which may be derived from animals.

476

Polyglycerol Polyricinoleate - Emulsifier

As this is produced from glycol esters the glycerol can be sourced from a by-product of animal fats in the manufacturing of soap.

477

Propane-1, 2-diol esters of fatty acids, propylene glycol esters of fatty acids - Emulsifier

The glycol esters of fatty acids can be sourced from a by-product of animal fats in the manufacturing of soap.

478

Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propane-1 - Emulsifier

See 477 above

479b

Thermally oxidized soya bean oil interacted with mono- and diglycerides of fatty acids - Emulsifier

See 471 above

481

Sodium Stearoyl-2-lactylate - Emulsifier

See 471 above and 270 (contains Lactic Acid and Stearic Acid)

482

Calcium Stearoyl-2-lactylate - Emulsifier

See 471 above and 270 (contains Lactic Acid and Stearic Acid)

483

Stearyl tartrate - Emulsifier

See 471 above

491

Sorbitan monostearate - Emulsifier and Stabilizer

From stearic acid and is used in dried yeast. Stearic acid is found in vegetable and animal fats, but commercial production is usually synthetic. See also 570

492

Sorbitan Tristearate - Emulsifier

See 491

493

Sorbitan Monolaurate - Emulsifier

See 491

494

Sorbitan Monooleate - Emulsifier

See 491

495

Sorbitan Monopalmitate - Emulsifier

See 491

542
Bone phosphate - Anti-caking agent
570

Stearic Acid Fatty Acid - Anti-caking agent

Stearic acid is found in vegetable and animal fats, but commercial production is usually synthetic. Often used in dried yeast.

572

Magnesium stearate, calcium stearate - Emulsifier and Anti-caking agent

See Stearic Acid 570

585

Ferrous lactate - Colouring

A lactate is a compound formed when a mineral is bound to lactic acid. This is why additives named as a lactate may have been derived from an animal source such as whey. (see 270)

631

Disodium inosinate - Flavour enhancer

Almost always made from animals and fish

635

Disodium 5'-ribonucleotides - Flavour enhancer

Often made from animals

640

Glycine and its sodium salt - Flavour enhancer

Can sometimes be prepared from gelatine.

901

Beeswax - white and yellow - Glazing Agent

Not suitable for Vegans.

904

Shellac - Glazing Agent

Shellac is a resin secreted by an insect called the lac bug Laccifer lacca Kerr (Coccidae) . It is often unclear as to whether the insect is killed in the process of commercially obtaining shellac as the resin is left by the insect on various plants. Whether this resin is harvested as a residue or extracted by directly killing the insects needs further investigation.

910

L-cysteine - Improving agent

Produced commercially from animal and human hair (and feathers). When produced from animal hair it is almost certain that all L-cysteine is taken from slaughtered animals. When human hair is used it is often sourced from women in third-world countries. L-cysteine is used as an additive in around 5% of bread and other bakery products. It is not used in wholemeal bread or other wholemeal bakery products.

920

L-cysteine hydrochloride - Improving agent

Produced from L-cystine (see 910 above)

921

L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate - Improving agent

Produced from L-cystine (see 910 above)

966

Lactitol - Sweetener

Derived from Lactose, commercially prepared using whey, so unsuitable for vegans.

report post quote code quick quote reply
Like x 1
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#4 [Permalink] Posted on 16th February 2012 20:43
update.

link in first post was incorrect. fixed.
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#5 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd April 2012 12:02
Mentos Fruit! (UPDATE AFTER INVESTIGATION = HARAM)

I've been given the task to find out if Mentos Fruit are Halal or not. (By family member)

Sugar, glucose syrup, hydrogenated vegetable oil, citric acid, fruit juices from concentrate, starch, sucrose esters of fatty acids, natural, colors (carmine, paprika oleoresin, beta-carotene, beetrood red), carnauba wax, beeswax E414, E418

The Ingredients does not say suitable for vegetarians, yet nothing in the ingredients looks Haram at first site.
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#6 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd April 2012 12:05
Last Updated: 17/05/2010

www.gmwa.org.uk/foodguide2/index.php?page=viewquestion&id=44

From the Muslim Food Guide By Shaykhayn Yusuf Sacha and Fahim Mayat.

Additive and 'E' numbers in food

Food additives are added to food to make it safer, keep it longer, stop the growth of bacteria, mould, and stop food going stale. They also aid processing as emulsifiers, raising agents, preservatives and improve food in terms of colour, taste, texture and nutritional value.

Additives increase the variety of food available to consumers keeping prices down, allowing safe delivery of food to urban populated areas and create alternatives to traditional food like meat substitutes for meat, low fat products for butter and yoghurt and sugar free drinks for diabetics.

The use of additives is strictly controlled by law. They may not be used in food unless they are on approved Government supervised list, proving their safe and effective usage. Once approved by the EC it is then given an 'E' number and is constantly monitored by local Government and the EEC.

EEC directives require all food to list ingredients of the various products used because additives being so complicated by way of understanding leave alone pronouncing would have ingredients look like a chemist's dictionary.

The E Numbers are divided into 9 categories

Permitted Colours Numbers 100-180
Preservatives Numbers 200-290
Permitted Anti-oxidants Numbers 300-321
Emulsifiers and Stabilisers Numbers 322-494
Sweeteners Numbers 420-421
Solvents Numbers 422
Mineral Hydrocarbons Numbers 905-907
Modified Starches Numbers 1400-1442
Miscellaneous Additives Numbers 170-927

The 'E' numbers were introduced to make it easier for EEC countries to come to a uniform system of regulating the additives industry.

We are publishing a list of numbers, some of which are haraam and some of which are doubtful, because of its doubtful nature Muslims have to find out the source.

E120 Cochineal (Carmine of Cochineal Carminicago, C.I.75490, derived from the insect Dactilopius Coccus.

E160 Alfa-Carotene, Beta-Carotene, Gamma-Carotene.

E471 Mono and Di-Glycerides of fatty acids.
When Glycerol is used one has to find out the source whether animal or synthetic.

E472 (a-e) Lactic acid esters of mono- and di-glycerides of fatty acids. Prepared from esters of Glycerol.

E473 Sucrose esters of fatty acids prepared from Glycerol and Sucrose.

E474 Sycroglycerides prepared by reaction of Sucrose on natural triglycerides (from palmoil, lard, etc.)

E475 Polyglycerol esters of Fatty acids. Prepared in the laboratory.

476 Polyglycerol esters of polycondensed fatty acids of castor oil (polyglycerol polyricinoleate). Prepared from Castor Oil and Glycerol esters.


E477 Propane-1,2-idol esters of fatty acids (Propylene Glycol esters of Fatty acids). Prepared from Propylene Glycol.

E478 Lactylated fatty acid esters of glycerol and propane-1,2-idol. Prepared from esters of glycerol and Lactic acid.

E631 Insine (Disodium Phospate, Sodium and Inosinate). The Disodium Salt of Inosinate Acid which can be prepared from insect or fish extract.

E635 A mixture of disodium guanylare and disodium inosinate. Same source as 631.

E640/920
L-Cysteine Hydrochloride and L-Cysteine hydrochloride mono hydrate. A naturally occurring amino acid manufactured from animal hair and chicken feathers.


(L-cysteine from chicken feathers is permissible but not from human hair)


All other 'E' number additives at the time of publication are Halaal, because of the ruling of Tabdeel-e-Mahiyat. Please refer to our article elsewhere in this book on this subject.

Except the following:
E473, E474, E475, E476, E477, E478, E631, E635, E640, E920



Allah reward you for using the Foodguide Service. Allah give us tawfique to eat Halaal all the time. Please tell your friends and please pray for us too.

... and Allah Ta'ala Knows Best



Was-Salaamualaikum
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#7 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd April 2012 12:06
Carnauba Wax

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Carnauba wax
Carnauba (English pronunciation: /kɑːrˈnɔːbə/ or /kɑːrˈnaʊbə/), also called Brazil wax and palm wax, is a wax of the leaves of the palm Copernicia prunifera, a plant native to and grown only in the northeastern Brazilian states of Piau, Cear, and Rio Grande do Norte.[1] It is known as "queen of waxes"[2] and usually comes in the form of hard yellow-brown flakes. It is obtained from the leaves of the carnauba palm by collecting them, beating them to loosen the wax, then refining and bleaching the wax.
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#8 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd April 2012 12:09
beta-Carotene


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

β-Carotene is a strongly-coloured red-orange pigment abundant in plants and fruits. It is an organic compound and chemically is classified as a hydrocarbon and specifically as a terpenoid (isoprenoid), reflecting its derivation from isoprene units. β-Carotene is biosynthesized from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate.[3] It is a member of the carotenes, which are tetraterpenes, synthesized biochemically from eight isoprene units and thus having 40 carbons. Among this general class of carotenes, β-Carotene is distinguished by having beta-rings at both ends of the molecule. Absorption of β-Carotene is enhanced if eaten with fats, as carotenes are fat soluble.

Carotene is the substance in carrots that colours them orange and is the most common form of carotene in plants. When used as a food colouring, it has the E number E160a
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#9 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd April 2012 12:14
Paprika oleoresin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Paprika oleoresin (also known as paprika extract) is an oil soluble extract from the fruits of Capsicum Annum Linn or Capsicum Frutescens(Indian red chillies), and is primarily used as a colouring and/or flavouring in food products. It is composed of capsaicin, the main flavouring compound giving pungency in higher concentrations, and capsanthin and capsorubin, the main colouring compounds (among other carotenoids).[1]

Extraction is performed by percolation with a variety of solvents, primarily hexane, which are removed prior to use
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#10 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd April 2012 12:25
abu mohammed wrote:
A very interesting find.
Ulama ID 03 wrote:
www.muftisays.com/forums/articles-stories-more/548/mc-don... "I have researched this & found that in the UK if a food product is less than 2% contents of animal fat or other Haraam content then they do not need to declare it, they can still pass it as suitable for vegetarians" Assalamu Alaikum Warahmatullahi Wabarakatuh


This is where this comes in!

From what I have found out, it seems that due to some Vegans who do not eat processed sugar (SUCROSE esters of fatty acids) They do not call it suitable for vegeterians.

And with further investigation, we find that (SUCROSE esters of fatty acids) = E473 and according to Mufti Sacha's investigation above THIS IS HARAM



MENTOS FRUIT ARE HARAM because of (SUCROSE esters of fatty acids), although disguised as sugars, it is E473 and is HARAM
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#11 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd April 2012 12:41
I do not want to go into detail as to why it is Haram, Mufti Saab has said E473 is Haram, so for me it is Haram.

If you want to go into further detail, you are welcome to study this detailed document of what (SUCROSE esters of fatty acids) is
www.fao.org/ag/agn/jecfa-additives/specs/monograph10/addi...
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#12 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd April 2012 22:26

Which E-numbers are halal and haram ?
Which E-numbers are allowed by Islam ?
Which products contain ethanol and are haram ?

These three questions are related and are discussed here combined.

Forbidden additives

The list of really prohibited E-numbers is very short; E120 and E904 as these are made of or contain insects. E901 is made by insects, like honey, but does not contain insects and thus is generally considered halal.

All other E-numbers are basically permitted and also widely used in Islamic countries. However, this does not mean that all additives are always halal. In many additives fatty acids are used in the production. And it is a matter of concern for many Muslims where these come from. If these are from plant origin, they are halal, if they are from animal origin they may be halal or haram, depending on the animal, see also below. Chemically they are identical, from the chemical composition it can not be determined whether animal or vegetable fat has been used. Only the producer and/or ingredient supplier is able to provide this information.

Another complication is that additives can be listed by their chemical name or by their (E-) number. In the EU the producer has to provide the name or the number or both. Outside the EU many countries use the same numbering system, but generally without the E, and in other countries only the chemical names are used. The list of additives that may be of animal origin, or may contain fatty acids that may have been derived from animal origin, can be found here. In that list also the chemical name is provided.

Fatty acids

Fats, whether from plant or animal origin, consist of glycerol and generally 3 fatty acids. Fats can be split in fatty acids and glycerol (the same reaction also takes place in the intestine when fats are digested). The fatty acids can be purified and reconnected to glycerol as mono- di- of triglycerides (glycerol with 1, 2 or 3 fatty acids respectively). Many additives consist of these semi-natural fats, which act as emulsifiers.

These semi-natural fats are degraded and metabolised in the body, just as normal fat.

Chemically the fatty acids from animal or plant origin are identical. Therefore the origin is of no importance for the function in the food. Producers thus normally choose the cheapest oils to make these fats. This is generally some vegetable oil, which makes the additives halal. However, animal fats can not be excluded and thus the same additive may be sometimes haram.

Discussion

In the Islamic world there are several additional discussions on additives containing fatty acids. Here we will mention the two points of issue, but, unless there is agreement among Islamic scholars, we do not further elaborate on the arguments of all parties concerned.

The first issue is the presence of animal fatty acids. If this fatty acid originates from pork, it is generally considered haram. If it is from other animals, it is generally considered halal. However, there is a discussion whether animal fat from other animals as pigs, is halal when the animal is not slaughtered in the prescribed Islamic way.

The second issue is whether the presence of fatty acids originally derived from pork, makes the additives haram. The final additive, as present in the products, is not present in pork (it is not a natural component) and thus is not by definition haram.

The first issue limits the use of many additives and/or complicates the matter for many Muslims, the second discussion actually makes it easier for many Muslims to choose products.

Alcohol and ethanol

According to Islam the use of alcohol is forbidden, as it may influence the mind of the person and thus his behaviour. Unfortunately when the Quran was written, the word alcohol did mean only ethanol. Nowadays, chemically, alcohol means all chemical components with an -OH (or alcohol) group. Unfortunately in common daily language, alcohol means either ethanol, or any drink with a certain percentage of ethanol. For religious purposes and in daily life ethanol and alcohol thus are identical, but for chemists ethanol is just one of many alcohols.

Ethanol is produced during the fermentation of a product by (mainly) yeasts. In most cases this results in very low percentages, and these are not influencing the brain. In products such as bread, yoghurt, kefir and similar, ethanol is produced during the production. Still, these products are halal, as the percentage of alcohol in the final product is extremely low. It is impossible to get drunk from these products. In those cases where sufficient amounts of alcohol are produced, such as wine, beer and spirits, the percentages are high enough to get drunk, these products thus are haram.

Vinegar is a product which is traditionally prepared from wine or other fermented liquids. During the fermentation, the ethanol is converted by the bacteria into acetic acid. The final vinegar thus contains only traces of ethanol. Again, you can not get drunk from vinegar, and vinegar is considered halal. Modern vinegar can also be made chemically and never contained ethanol. Traditional vinegar thus is often referred to as wine vinegar or similar, which may be confusing. Wine vinegar does not contain wine or ethanol, it simply indicates that is is made of wine and not made chemically.

Sugar alcohols are sweeteners, also known als polyols. This category includes sorbitol, xylitol and a number of other products, all with a name ending on -itol. These products are made of sugars and chemically the aldehyde or ketone group in the sugar is converted into an alcohol group ( =O is converted into -OH). Here alcohol stands for the chemical group and has nothing to do with ethanol, the forbidden form of alcohol. Sugar alcohols thus are halal.

http://www.food-info.net/uk/qa/qa-fi47.htm

report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#13 [Permalink] Posted on 23rd April 2012 22:57
Alcohol is suitable for vegetarians, so a can of shandy will be suitable for vegetarians but not Muslims. (this is in response to the apple juice query)
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#14 [Permalink] Posted on 8th May 2012 09:41
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
18704
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5171
#15 [Permalink] Posted on 8th May 2012 09:54

"The BBC" wrote:

Beer batter

Veg

Ingredients

250g/8oz plain flour

60g/2oz cornflour

300ml/10fl oz sparkling ale

300ml/10fl oz soda water

Preparation method

  1. Place the flours in a large bowl and whisk together.

  2. Add the beer and soda water and mix to incorporate.

  3. Whisk vigorously to get rid of any lumps.

  4. Let stand for 10 minutes and then whisk again for 30 seconds.

  5. If for some reason there are still lumps, simply strain them out.

  6. The batter will fry crisper if no salt is added and it is not refrigerated.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/beerbatter_7193

 

 

Clearly labelled as VEG but contains a whopping 300ml of ALE!!!!!!!!!!

 

 

report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
Back to top Post New Topic Reply

 

Quick Reply

CAPTCHA - As you are a guest, you are required to answer the following:


In the above image: What shape is the green shape ('box' is not a shape)?