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Tadhkiratur Rashid - Extract 2- TAZKIYAH AND TASARRUFĀT

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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 28th March 2016 22:04
TAZKIYAH AND TASARRUFĀT

Allāh Ta’ala appointed Imām Rabbānī as a deputy of Rasūlullāh sallallahu alayhi wasallam in this tumultuous era for the purpose of teaching the injunctions of the Sharī‛ah and purifying and cleansing the hearts. Thus, we cannot even imagine the level of his qūwwat-e-qudsīyyah. Thirteen centuries after Rasūlullāh sallallahu alayhi wasallam, the ummah had become total slaves of the customs of their era – customs which had replaced the compulsory duties of the Sharī‛ah. Their deprivation of spiritual perception was obvious. This was especially true where the desires of the soul had caused them to consider bid‛āt (innovations) as ‛ibādāt (acts of worship), and where materialistic maulwīs had labelled the sanctified group of Ahlullāh as ‘Wahhābīs’ and thereby caused the masses to become averse to them and to shun them. Under such circumstances, it is only a strong-hearted Shaykh who could draw their aversion-filled hearts.

Maulwī Nazar Muhammad Khān is a resident of Ābhah. His poor father was a religious man, but when he heard that Deobandī maulwīs are Wahhābīs, he became averse to meeting them. On one occasion, Hadrat Imām Rabbānī, Maulānā Muhammad Qāsim Sāhib [Nānautwī], and Maulānā Muhammad Ya‛qūb Sāhib came to Nānautā. It was a Friday, and a few people came from Ābhah for the jumu‛ah salāh. Nazar Muhammad Khān Sāhib was a youngster at the time, but he was quite intelligent. He said to his father: “I am going to Nānautā. I have heard that a few maulwīs have come there.” His father prohibited him saying: “Bhāi, they are Wahhābīs, and we ought to abstain from the company of Wahhābīs.” He replied: “Yes, they may be Wahhābīs, but I have never seen Wahhābīs before and my heart desires to see what they look like.” His father did not want to send him with outsiders, so he personally went with his son, saying: “I have also never seen any Wahhābī. Let’s go and see what they look like.”

When they stepped into the Jāmi‛ Musjid, their eyes first fell on Hadrat Maulānā Ya‛qūb Sāhib rahimahullāh. Maulānā had just performed ghusl and was drying his hair outside. First of all, he was very handsome. The light and effulgence which emanated from his face made him appear even more handsome. The were astounded and continued staring at him for a long time. They thought to themselves: “Wahhābīs ought to appear more ugly and repulsive than the Shī‛ah, but this person appears to be the embodiment of light and effulgence.” They proceeded and presented themselves before Hadrat Imām Rabbānī. No sooner did they meet him, when they felt something unique within their hearts and they developed great love for him. After the jumu‛ah salāh an announcement was made that Maulānā Muhammad Qāsim Sāhib was going to deliver a lecture. Hadrat Maulānā used to accord utmost respect to Imām Rabbānī and therefore declined to deliver a lecture. However, upon Imām Rabbānī’s insistence, Maulānā Qāsim al-‛Ulūm [Qāsim Nānautwī] went forward and started to shower his words of wisdom upon the audience.

Maulwī Nazar Muhammad Khān Sāhib used to relate: “We were constantly indoctrinated into thinking that these Deobandī ‛ulamā’ reject Rasūlullāh sallallahu alayhi wasallam, that they are disrespectful towards him, and that they are Wahhābīs. It was Hadrat Maulānā’s karāmat for having commenced his lecture on the merits and excellent qualities of Rasūlullāh sallallahu alayhi wasallam. His eloquence was obvious, but the fine points which he mentioned were probably never even dreamt of by the maulūd group and our hearts were blossoming like flowers. I said to my father: ‘Janāb! If this is what it is to be a Wahhābī, then I have become a Wahhābī. I cannot be separated from them.’”

In short, they had arrived as antagonistic onlookers, but they left as sincere, devoted servants. The fruit of their sincerity and devotion increased by the day and it continued blossoming.

There are thousands of stories of this nature. I related just one incident to demonstrate how Allāh Ta’ala had blessed this sanctified group with the ability to influence (tasarruf) non-adherents. Conversely, others find it difficult to influence and control their own adherents – even when they spread their web of [good] character and kindness.

There are many from amongst Imām Rabbānī’s murīds who, at some time in their past, held onto incorrect beliefs. However, once they remained in his company, they were completely overpowered by his qūwwat-e-qudsīyyah. Not only did they adopt correct beliefs, but they became his devoted khādims. If this was the level of the general tasarrufāt which he had on outsiders, what can be said of the excellent effects that were enjoyed by those who had developed some affiliation with him, or by those who had become his khādims and murīds? It is difficult to gauge the extent of the effect he had on them.

No matter how materialistic a person may have been – the moment he presented himself before Hadrat, he would experience a desire to turn to Allāh Ta’ala and to be obedient unto Him. This change in him would be so drastic, that he would never have dreamt it to be possible prior to meeting Hadrat. His heart, which had been engrossed in the temporary and fleeting concerns and occupations of this world, would experience the effect of vigilance and he would question himself: “How long are you going to remain engrossed in the futile activities of this world, and why are you heedless of acquiring the eternal bounties [of the Hereafter]?”

The person would become remorseful and regret the time he had wasted in the past. He would develop a yearning for the Hereafter. Since this [repentence] is the basis for the acquisition of the fruits of the Hereafter, the more the person progressed in this regard, the more his quest for the truth would increase, and the more he would experience an increase in his yearning to reach Allāh Ta’ala.

It would be difficult for us to fathom the extremely powerful nature of the spiritual tasarrufāt (influences) which Imām Rabbānī wielded. Since this influence is such that it is highly affected by the affinity and bond between the murīd and his Shaykh, everyone – the near, the distant, the present and the absent – were all equal in benefiting from his qūwwat-e-qudsīyyah.

Sufi Karam Husayn was in his hometown. After the fajr salāh he became involved in his worldly activities and remained occupied until the zuhr adhān. He left his work aside, performed his zuhr and went back to his work until ‛asr – and then until maghrib. He remained fully occupied in his work the entire day and missed all his awrād wa adhkār (different forms of dhikr) for the day. He certainly performed every fard salāh, but it was only his body which was standing before Allāh Ta’ala, while his mind remained attached to his work.

After maghrib, while still busy with his work, his heart suddenly experienced an external influence which compelled him to leave the work at hand and occupy himself in dhikr. The more he tried to repel these thoughts, the more they imposed upon him. They eventually fell upon his heart like a continuous downpour, which caused him to lose control over his hands and legs. He performed his ‛ishā salāh and remained engrossed in Allāh Ta’ala – expressing his remorse and turning to Him for several hours. His heart experienced complete joy and contentment in this.

Hāfiz ‛Abd al-‛Azīz Sāhib Barelwī completed memorizing the Qur’ān when he was twenty-one years old and, for a few years thereafter, he performed tarāwīh salāh. Then he became completely engrossed in earning his livelihood. This caused him to neglect the basic recitation of the Qur’ān. Obviously, remembering the Qur’ān is dependent upon constant revision and recitation. If this revision is non-existent, how can a person remember the Qur’ān? Within a few years, he had forgotten everything. Initially he felt great remorse for having allowed himself to lose such a great bounty, but after some time even this remorse disappeared. Twenty-two years passed in this condition. Not a single time did the thought cross his mind that he used to be in possession of such a great treasure, but that he had allowed it to be snatched away from him and it had left him a pauper.

He was forty five years old when he presented himself before Hadrat. His father passed away a few days after he had pledged bay‛ah to Hadrat. Instead of an increase in concern for worldly burdens, he had suddenly become remorseful for having deprived not only himself, but also his father, of the benefits of memorizing the Qur’ān. This concern increased to such an extent that he could not think of anything else. When he considered his age, he could feel that his mind had become weak and his memory had become incapable. However, his yearning had left him restless. Since these thoughts were the results of his Shaykh’s tasarruf, he plucked up the courage and wrote a letter to Hadrat in which he informed him of his intention. Hadrat replied: “Put in all your effort and Allāh Ta’ala will assist you. Leave aside all your wird wa shughl (different forms of dhikr and spiritual practices) and remain engrossed in this [the re-memorization of the Qur’ān]. When man applies his mind to something, all difficulties become easy.”

He placed his trust in Allāh Ta’ala,
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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 28th March 2016 22:09
He placed his trust in Allāh Ta’ala, resumed the memorization of the Qur’ān, and reached his goal within a few months. He has now performed several tarāwīh salāhs and, despite his worldly occupations, he has developed an ardent love for the recitation of the Qur’ān – so much so, that he never omits the reading of a manzil on any day.

Maulwī Muhammad Sahūl Sāhib was a teacher at Madrasah Shāhjahānpūr. He lay down before ‛ishā salāh and fell asleep. He had a dream in which he saw himself in Gangoh. A congregational salāh was in progress and Hadrat was leading the salāh. He saw himself performing wudū’ in order to join the congregation, but the congregation ended before he could complete his wudū’. He, together with a few others, were deprived of joining the congregation. Upon completing his salāh, Hadrat Imām Rabbānī came into the courtyard of the Musjid and, in an angry tone, he addressed all those who had not performed their salāh with congregation, saying: “People claim allegiance to me, yet they are so unmindful of salāh!”

Maulwī Sahūl Sāhib regretted his negligence and his eyes opened immediately. He realized that it was already midnight. He got up, performed his salāh, and remained vigilant since that day.

Inspector Asad ‛Alī Sāhib was initially an irreligious person. His appointment as a police inspector, and the nineteen certificates which he had obtained, were obviously acquired after much effort and toiling. He personally acknowledges: “I was extremely strict by nature and very audacious. Wearing English [western] clothes had become my salient feature. I did not differentiate between lawful and unlawful, right and wrong. While in this condition, I pledged bay‛ah to Hadrat. When I returned to my work, I suddenly started to developed an aversion towards this world and a yearning for the Hereafter. I lost all interest in my occupation as an inspector. I became remorseful over wasting my life in this way. I felt like leaving my employment, going into a cave, and spending my time in Allāh’s remembrance. I developed a natural inclination towards following the Sharī‛ah. Without anyone advising me or instructing me, I felt an aversion towards wearing English [western] clothes. Within a few days, I became like a mullā [maulwī] – wearing a long kurtah and a pants which was above my ankles. I neither bothered about promotion in my employment nor about any increase in my income.”

People started laughing at him and mocked his condition. But, he had become extremely remorseful over his evil ways. He would remain in solitude and weep over his sins. He would say to himself: “How sorrowful! For what purpose have I been sent into this world and what have I been doing with my time?”

How could he possibly have maintained his job while in such a condition? He was reprimanded and was forced to change jobs several times. Eventually he became very restless with his employment and felt that it would be a great boon if he were to resign. He handed in his resignation and informed Hadrat about it. He wrote to Hadrat saying: “I now have no desire except presenting myself in your court and spending my entire life there.” Hadrat Imām Rabbānī wrote back: “Consider whatever falls in your destiny to be for your own good and remain pleased with it, even if it appears indigestible. I d
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