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Salafism in China

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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 25th January 2011 10:48

Salafism in China

From Muslim Wiki

Known as the xin xin jiao (new new teachings) or the (san tai jiao) teachings of the three salutations, in reference to the raising of the hands when Allah akhbar is pronounced .

Salafism came to China in the 1930's from among the Yihewani.

In China the salafiya cut their hair short, indicating their interpretation of the earlier text.

Atleast they acknowledge that it is NEW NEW and NOT NOT the Original way of the Salaf.

 

The Yihewani was a salafi/Wahabi movement, which entered into China during late 19th century. About 20% of Hui people followed this movement. The term 'Yihewani' is a Chinese pronounciation of an Arabic term 'Ikhwan' which means "brotherhood".

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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 6th February 2014 08:51
Assalaamu 'Alaykum

Is this really a strand of the modern day "Salafiyya"?

I found this:

Ikhwan, which literally means brotherhood, is also called Ahl al-Sunni (a sect abiding by the Holy Qur'an) and most other sects call it the New Sect. It was established by Ma Wanfu, a well-known Dongxiang Imam in Hezhou (now the Linxia Hui Prefecture in Gansu), at the end of the 19th century. In the short time of some tens of years, it has quickly developed into a new sect covering Gansu, Ningxia and Qinghai. It abides by the doctrine of Sunni and follows the teaching of the Hanafiyyah School, maintaining that all the etiquettes and ceremonies that are not in line with the Holy Qur'an and Hadith should be abolished. It is against mausoleum and murshid (guide) worship, and advocates that preaching and Da'wah should be done in Chinese.

english.ts.cn/zt/Islam/CHAPTER%202-2%20Birth%20and%20Grow...

^Does being against the wrongs and ills of modern day "Sufism" make one a "Salafi"/"Wahhabi"?

I would not be too hasty in branding the Yihewani/Ikhwan as "Salafi". In fact, I would not brand anyone in a hurry as "Salafi".

Thoughts?
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#3 [Permalink] Posted on 6th February 2014 09:06
This is quite interesting as I read up on this a little.

It seems Yiheweni follows more of "modernist" or nationalist path. Their ideology was influenced from the earlier anti-Sufism by Hu Songshan: sinnerinrepentance.blogspot.com/2011/06/chinese-muslim-na...

Hu Songshan, a former Sufi who converted to the Yihewani sect, reformed the Yihewani, making it less hostile to Chinese culture, and integrated modern teaching, and Chinese nationalism into Yihewani teachings.

And this on wiki: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muslim_groups_in_China#Wahhabi.2FSa...

Wahabbism is intensely opposed by Hui in China, by the Hanafi Sunni Gedimu and Sufi Khafiya and Jahriyya. The opposition is so much so that even the Yihewani Chinese sect, which is fundamentalist and was founded by Ma Wanfu who was originally inspired by the Wahhabis, reacted with hostility to Ma Debao and Ma Zhengqing, who attempted to introduce Wahhabism/Salafism as the main form of Islam. They were branded as traitors, and Wahhabi teachings were deemed as heresy by the Yihewani leaders. Ma Debao established a Salafi/Wahhabi order, called the Sailaifengye (Salafi) menhuan in Lanzhou and Linxia, a completely separate sect.[6]

This is perhaps more accurate from www.islamichina.com/sects-a-legal-schools.html

Ikhwan
Ikhwan usually refers to a reform sect since it started by launching a campaign against shrine worship (Sufi masters grave worship) and Murshid worship and tried to eliminate all Chinese influences to Islam and radically opposed adopting Chinese customs in religious practice and in Muslim daily life. Ikhwani based on the principle of "to follow the book and eliminate customs". Ikhwan strictly follows Hanafi school of thought and emphasizes on Ash'arism and Maturidism. The sect was founded by a Dongxiang Imam Ma Wanfu (1849-1934) from the village of Guoyuan in Hezhou in the 19th century after his return in 1892 from Makkah where he studied several years and was inspired by the Wahabi movement. Allied with a group of ten religious scholars, he started his reform movement. Though he was inspired by the Wahabi movement yet his reform was in no way a continuation of Wahabism or a branch of it for its Hanafi standpoint in jurisprudence and Ash'ari-Maturidism position in doctrine were, contrary to the Wahabism, very strong and uncompromising. Ikhwani in principle does not oppose Sufism but reject the excessive veneration to sufi masters and to their graves. It does not only reject some sufi practices but also oppose Qadeem's tradition which was influenced by Chinese culture without evidence from jurist books. The sect is mainly in Qinghai, Ningxia and Gansu but distributed in Shanghai, Henan, Shandong,Hebei, Xinjiang and some other areas.

Salafiyya
Salafiyya represent a continuation of the Wahabi movement in China and form a distinctive sect among Hui people. The Salafiyya (also known as San Tai, lit. "three-rise" after the practice of raising their hands three times in each unit of a prayer) was first brought to China by Ma Debao (1867-1977) in the 1950s. When Ma Debao performed Hajj he was influenced by the Wahabi ideology and movement in Mecca. Upon his return to China he began to preach the Wahabi trends in Hezhou (today's Linxia city). Salafism in China simply duplicates the Wahabi ideology and approach predominant in Saudi Arabia and even imitates Saudi customs in dress. It fiercely criticizes Sufism and the influences of Chinese culture. in religious practices as it opposes to follow any sort of school of thought in jurisprudence and doctrine. They reject claim of Hanbali school of thought though they strictly follow Ibn Taymiyya. The sect was mainly found in Hezhou of Gansu province but now spread in many places notably Ningxia, Qinghai, Yunnan, Tianjing with support of Saudi religious organizations.

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#4 [Permalink] Posted on 6th February 2014 09:20
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