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Arslan., Taalibah, Muadh_Khan, ibn Ismail, abu mohammed, Yasin
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#46 [Permalink] Posted on 16th December 2015 09:14
Ryder wrote:
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مَا شَآءَاللَّهُ لَا قُوَّةَ إِلَّا بِاللَّه

Very prompt reply;

Waalaikumus Salaam

I have not seen any commentary however, any breed and full white or predominantly also would fit the description.

And Allah knows best

Wassalaam

Request for duas

E.M.H.Salejee
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#47 [Permalink] Posted on 16th December 2015 12:04
That was fast ibn ismail, thanks.

Unfortuntely Light sussex are about 3/4 white, and 1/4 black, so I would not say they are predominantly white. I will probably change my breeding and start prioritisng breeding white birds, although I will always have a few vraious breeds as a colourful flock looks great.

The best option from the white PURE breeds, when eggs is the main priority rather than meat, would be without exception the white leghorn. These leghorns have the dominant white gene, which means that when they are bred to any other breed of chicken, the next generation will also come out mainly white.

The best option from the white PURE breeds, if meat is a priority, depends on how fast you want the meat. If a person is willing to wait 6+ months then White Indian Game (known as white cornish in the US) or White Jersey Giant would arguably be the best option. The jersey Giants will have the advantage that they will lay a lot more eggs than the Indian game. Indian Game are useless for eggs.

If a person wants something faster say at around 4-5 months, and don't mind slightly less meat, then White La Bresse, Australorp, White Rock, White Wyandotte, And Rhode Island Whites would probably be the best option. These 4 breeds are dual purpose, that means as well as providing a decent amount of meat they will provide a good amount of eggs also.

However all these meat breeds mentioned have the recessive white gene except for the Rhode Island White and la bresse which, like the white leghorn, has the dominant white gene.

Personally, If i'm going to stick with breeding better white birds for both eggs and meat, I will stick with a dominant white gene, it'll save me a lot of headache trying to get the white back into a breed if I decide to outcross to improve performance. So that gives me the option of La bresse or RIW white or White Leghorn.

Non of the above breeds will come anywhere close to the egg and meat production of the commercial hybrids for eggs or meat - but that's another story.





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#48 [Permalink] Posted on 16th December 2015 12:15
I forgot to mention Ixworths. Another great dual purpose breed with the dominant white gene. But it's comb is rose comb. I hate to pester muftis with small, virutally meaningless questions, but the hadith that was talking about the crown/comb of the chicken. Ibn Ismail, Could you perchance ask the mufti if there is any indication as to whether the hadith would have been referring to the very common and main type of comb, the single comb, which is what would have probably been around at the time of the prophet, peace be upon him, or if any of the newer types of combs would all also be included in that hadith. If you google ixworth or better yet, google wyandotte chicken, and you'll see different type of comb to the normal single comb.
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#49 [Permalink] Posted on 16th December 2015 12:16
Ryder wrote:
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مَا شَآءَاللَّهُ لَا قُوَّةَ إِلَّا بِاللَّه

Your knowledge on Fowls....

May Allah Ta'ala keep you with aafiyat. Ameen.
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#50 [Permalink] Posted on 16th December 2015 14:02
ibn Ismail wrote:
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The wife thinks I care about my chickens more than family when ever I'm discussing my master breeding plans with my son lol. Once you start breeding it's gets highly addictive as you constantly keep trying to improve your strain.

You'd be suprised how long I spend on the the chicken calculator figuring out my next top secret breeding combinations

kippenjungle.nl/kruising.html

did you see my question above about the comb? Any chance you could find out?
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#51 [Permalink] Posted on 16th December 2015 16:58
Ryder wrote:
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ٱلسَّلَامُ عَلَيكُم وَرَحمَةُٱللَّهِ وَ بَرَكَاتُه

That post skipped past me, just read now, I'll ask Mufti sahab إِن شَآءَٱللَّه
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#52 [Permalink] Posted on 18th December 2015 15:11
Ryder wrote:
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ٱلسَّلَامُ عَلَيكُم وَرَحمَةُٱللَّهِ وَ بَرَكَاتُه
Sorry for posting late.
Mufti Sahab replied;

Waalaikumus salaam

In my limited knowledge and understanding it would be all. And Allah knows best.

Wassalaam

E.M.H.Salejee

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#53 [Permalink] Posted on 19th December 2015 10:08
والسلام

جزاك الله خيرا

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#54 [Permalink] Posted on 18th January 2016 10:06
ٱلسَّلَامُ عَلَيكُم وَ رَحمَةُٱللهِ وَ بَرَكَاتُه

Wanted to share another observation to derive lesson from; especially married brothers and sisters.

Currently I have a cockerel and a chicken.

The cockerel always accompanied the chicken like a guard, and a leader, plucking out grain/food for her amd calling her(yes in fowl language, not as fowl as current human husbands call on their wives with ; ))

In the coop, the chicken was shielded with the cockerel for warmth in the cold.

Now the cockerel is sick, can't stand and the chicken, who used to eat about anything, now refuses to eat, probably out of depression. She just sits sometimes or stands near her husband; on the lookout.

SubhanAllah! Animals with such a loving bond. A shame for most of our current married couples...

Request duas.

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#55 [Permalink] Posted on 18th January 2016 10:14
Above post slightly edited, removed nickname and replaced with full name :)
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#56 [Permalink] Posted on 19th January 2016 09:28
والسلام

Ibn Ismail, do you mind sharing some more of the symptoms of your rooster and hen? Just to get an idea of what could be wrong with them?

This is some general advice for anyone who may be interested becasue they have an ill chicken.

1. Prevention is better than cure. There are many things a chicken owner can do to prevent illness.

2. Chickens need company, it is not a good idea to keep 1 chicken by itself. Everyone should have a minimum of 2. A lone chicken could get depressed, leading to illness.

3. If a chicken does become ill in your flock, you should ideally qurantine it, as disease amongst chickens spread from chicken to chicken like wildfire thorugh feed, water, poop, dander etc. It is better to lose one chicken, than risk your whole flock getting ill.

4. A young active rooster needs atleast 3 hens. Otherwise he may overmate with just one or two hens, casuing great stress to the hens as well as bareback problems. An older, less active rooster however should not be too much of a problem for 1 hen.

5. The earlier a disease is detected the more chance of recovery there is for the chicken. Some common signs of illness to lookout for are

  • Not eating or drinking
  • standing fluffed up more often than usual
  • runny eyes/nose
  • caughing
  • drooping wings and tail


6. Without going into detail about what works for what illness and to what effect (if you don't want to use chemicals and keep things as natural as possible), the following food items can be good immune boosters or provide general boosts (don't overfeed these things though)

  • Crushed garlic
  • cayenne pepper or anything else very spicy
  • Green tea
  • ACV with the mother
  • Oregano or it's oil (just a few drops in water)
  • if it's cold give them something warm liked cooked oats
  • pumpkin seeds
  • cloves
  • cinnamon


that's all I can think of from the top of my head for now.






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#57 [Permalink] Posted on 19th January 2016 10:14
Ryder wrote:
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ٱلسَّلَامُ عَلَيكُم وَ رَحمَةُٱللهِ وَ بَرَكَاتُه

جَزَاكَ ٱللهُ خَيرًا
For your concern.

The hen seems to be depressed on the sickness of the cockerel.

She doesn't have an appetite after the rooster got sick, but walks fine ٱلحَمدُلِلَّه

The rooster can't stand, though he seems to have increasrd movement now ٱلحَمدُلِلَّه

He is above 3 years of age. My dad manually puts food in his mouth and water aswell. He has lacy stuff from his beak, probably thick saliva. We give tomato strips (his favorite), and chopped Garlic (also a favorite), and bread usually.
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#58 [Permalink] Posted on 19th January 2016 11:33
The rooster sounds like he may have sour crop or one of the colds, like mycoplasma.

Do you want to keep him, or eat him? Personally I would eat him, at that age, especially if he is ill.

If you want to keep him:

If he has thick saliva, does he also have runny eyes or nostrils or a sort of cough from time to time? If he does have these 3 things, it's possible he has mycoplasma.

Hold your nose close to his beak. If you can smell a strong stench coming from his beak it's likely he has sour crop. Sour crop in the later stages is usually a death warrant.

ONe thing you could do (it's not a cure but may help) Hold rooster up side down (only for a few seconds at a time, as they struggle to breath in this position) and gently massage his crop (where the food gets stored up in the chest area), gently pushing down towards his beak (his beak is now down and legs up, as he is more or less upside down). A lot of the thick saliva will flow out clearing some of his insides.

Of course it could be something else completely, but from the symptoms you've given I would say it's likely that it's one of those things. That's what I would do anyway, of course it's entirley up to you how you pursue the matter, however, as you know we are supposed to care for our animals to the best of our abilities, so in this specific case, with a rooster that age, I would cull him and eat him, and put him out of his misery. Besides, what could be better for him than to go in the name of Allah.

sorry if I seem like i'm invading your space, but when I was a kid I had a pet budgie. I did not look after it very well, and occassionally I used to forget to feed it. So it would eat the newspaper on the bottom of it's cage, and after some time it died whilst still young, probably due to the ink poisining. Later when I became more Islamically aware, I started caring about the welfare of animals, especially birds, more than normal, as to this day i regret how I treated that budgie. So I just want the best for your chickens, and sometimes the best course of action actually is to cull.

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#59 [Permalink] Posted on 19th January 2016 14:16
Ryder wrote:
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جَزَاكَ ٱللهُ خَيرًا

Will try the relief remedy إِن شَآءَٱلله

The idea of eating an ill animal, as far as I know we can't eat it. I am open for correction though.

Yes, to slaughter to relieve it of its' pain is something to consider. But make dua my dad agrees.

He acts all strong in front of the hen, and resists strongly when taken hold of for feeding. When she is out if sight he calms down, cute : )

No brother you aren't invading my space : )
Rather you are offering sincere advice. Really appreciate it and for that, جَزَاكَ ٱللهُ خَيرًا : )




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#60 [Permalink] Posted on 20th January 2016 09:47
ibn ismail, could you possibly find out about eating an ill chicken from mawlana salejee? I'm pretty certain it's permissable. If I remember correctly it was only if a chicken died due to illness then it cannot be eaten.

Now if it was the case that a chicken could not be eaten becasue it was ill, then that opens up a whole load of new questions. For example, How ill does it need to be, some chickens have illnesses but they are still walking around and eating fine, some may be unable to move much but can still eat, some cannot eat anymore, some are just standing around literally dying. Sometimes illnesses are not detected. In fact most chickens are ill to some extent most of the time (carriers of the disease, but not neccasirly showing symptoms), so we would not be eating much chicken.

جزاك الله خيرا

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