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#1801 [Permalink] Posted on 31st August 2016 19:42
Was wondering why text was turning bold, couldn't figure it out, until a friend sent me the following...


Screenshot_20160811-162920_1.jpg
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#1802 [Permalink] Posted on 8th September 2016 13:06
Back in 2006/7 I had one of my first Touch screen phones - The HTC Touch Windows 5 Mobile phone.


One thing that HTC did 10 years ago (approx) was they removed the Head phones jack and that meant that the headphones would plug into the USB port.

At first, this was a great idea, but then users realised that they would have to buy a double adaptor if they wanted to charge the phone and use the earphones (especially drivers)

Something like this


Or they would have to buy an adaptor if they wanted to use their old (or other) headphones


From 2006, fast forward to 2016, Apple have now resurrected the flop idea :( Well who knows, Apple fans will love it. Most definitely!
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#1803 [Permalink] Posted on 16th September 2016 09:44
A Saudi teenager living in Germany has proposed designing a headscarf emoji.

There are more.....


Rayouf Alhumedhi, 15, has sent a proposal to The Unicode Consortium, a non-profit corporation that reviews and develops new emojis.

The idea gained the backing of the co-founder of online discussion forum Reddit, Alexis Ohanian. If approved, her emoji will be available in 2017.

The proposal comes as countries across Europe wrestle with the issue of the Muslim veil - in all its forms.
The debate takes in religious freedom, female equality, secular traditions and even fears of terrorism.

The veil issue is part of a wider debate about multiculturalism in Europe, as many politicians argue that there needs to be a greater effort to assimilate ethnic and religious minorities.

'Emojis are everywhere'

Rayouf Alhumedhi told the BBC it was during a group chat with her friends on social media that she had realised there was no emoji to represent her, a headscarf-wearing woman.

After reading an article on emoji design, she wrote an email about her idea to Unicode.

Intrigued, a member of a Unicode subcommittee replied, offering to help her draft a formal proposal.

"In this day and age, representation is extremely important," she said of her reasons behind the project.

"People want to be acknowledged... and recognised, especially in the tech world. This is massive. Emojis are everywhere.

"There are so many Muslim women in this world who wear the headscarf. It might seem trivial... but it's different when you see yourself on the keyboard around the world. Once you experience that, it's really great."

To boost support for the initiative, Mr Ohanian hosted a Reddit live online discussion on Tuesday where Reddit users could ask Rayouf Alhumedhi about the new idea.

Some wanted to see whether they could get involved while others questioned the need for the hijab, saying it was a tool to oppress women.

The drafting committee hopes to present a final version of the proposal to Unicode in November.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-37358719
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#1804 [Permalink] Posted on 29th September 2016 10:47
www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0499q50

How Apple’s Wi-Fi Assist is catching people out

Unbeknownst to many Apple users, Wi-Fi Assist automatically boosts weak internet signals and charges you for the extra data used. Many users are running up extremely costly bills they're not aware of until it's too late. You have to physically opt-out of Wi-Fi Assist within the Settings on your iPhone. Winifred Robinson finds out what's been going on and how you can stop Wi-Fi Assist on your phone in the 4 minute video link above.
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#1805 [Permalink] Posted on 21st November 2016 15:21
Apple Keeps Constant Log Of iPhone Calls In iCloud, Warns Cop Contractor

Apple has a hidden feature for you in its iPhones: call logs going back as far as four months are stored in near real-time in the iCloud. That’s the warning today from a Russian provider of iPhone hacking tools, Elcomsoft, which claimed the feature was automatic and there was no way to turn it off bar shutting down iCloud Drive altogether.

Whilst it was well-known that iCloud backups would store call logs, contacts and plenty of other valuable data, users should be concerned to learn that their communications records are consistently being sent to Apple servers without explicit permission, said Elcomsoft CEO Vladimir Katalov. Even if those backups are disabled, he added, the call logs continue making their way to the iCloud, Katalov said.

“Syncing call logs happens almost in real time, though sometimes only in a few hours,” he added. “But all you need to have is just iCloud Drive enabled, and there is no way to turn that syncing off, apart from just disabling iCloud Drive completely. In that case many applications will stop working or lose iCloud-related features completely.”

All FaceTime calls are logged in the iCloud too, whilst as of iOS 10 incoming missed calls from apps like WhatsApp and Skype are uploaded, said Elcomsoft, which provides phone forensics tools to police. Its tools were also linked to the iCloud leaks of celebrity nude pictures, as anyone can purchase Elcomsoft kit. Last month, it revealed Apple had failed to properly secure its iTunes backups, making it much easier for its tools (and cybercriminals) to access users’ information. Apple subsequently updated iOS 10 to improve backup security. 

Boon for cops

Katalov believes automated iCloud storage of up-to-date logs would be beneficial for law enforcement wanting to get access to valuable iPhone data. And, he claimed, Apple hadn’t properly disclosed just what data was being stored in the iCloud and, therefore, what information law enforcement could demand.

Whereas Apple has declined to assist FBI forensics specialists in breaking its own security, it can easily access and provide iCloud data where the Cupertino tech titan is happy a legal warrant has been signed off by the Department of Justice. Indeed, in the case of the San Bernardino shooter, where the FBI demanded Apple help it hack the iPhone 5C of Syed Rizwan Farook, Apple revealed it had already handed over access to his iCloud. In its data access guide for law enforcement, Apple says the iCloud information that’s available includes email logs and content, text messages, photos, documents, contacts, calendars, bookmarks and iOS device backups.

“iCloud only stores content for the services that the subscriber has elected to maintain in the account while the subscriber’s account remains active,” Apple’s document reads. It does not mention consistently-updated call logs.

The document also claims Apple does not hold data on FaceTime calls for more than 30 days, which Elcomsoft claimed was inaccurate. “Synced data contains full information including call duration and both parties,” Elcomsoft wrote in a release today. “We were able to extract information going back more than four months.”

Apple said the syncing did exist, a spokesperson explaining: “We offer call history syncing as a convenience to our customers so that they can return calls from any of their devices. Apple is deeply committed to safeguarding our customers’ data.
“That’s why we give our customers the ability to keep their data private. Device data is encrypted with a user’s passcode, and access to iCloud data including backups requires the user’s Apple ID and password. Apple recommends all customers select strong passwords and use two-factor authentication.”

Last month, The Intercept discovered Apple was able to provide law enforcement with iPhone contacts, adding to concerns on just how the firm cooperated with FBI requests.

Time for Apple to ‘go all in on encryption’

Jonathan Zdziarski, a noted iOS forensics expert, told FORBES he believed Elcomsoft’s find was new and of concern, but was likely down to Apple oversight, as with the iTunes backup vulnerability of last month.

“I suspect that this is probably more of an engineering issue around making handoff work when you are answering calls between your phone and your desktop or if you’re using FaceTime on your desktop. They need to be able to sync a lot of that call data. I suspect whatever software engineer wrote that part of it probably decided to just go and stick that data in your iCloud Drive because that’s kind of what it’s purpose is,” said Zdziarski, who’d been briefed by Elcomsoft prior to today too. “I’m convinced it wasn’t very well thought out if that’s the case.”

Zdziarski said the research should give Apple further encouragement to add proper end-to-end encryption to the iCloud. All iCloud content data is encrypted once it’s on the server and in transit. But unlike with its iPhone device encryption, Apple keeps the keys for iCloud accounts in its U.S. data centers, meaning whilst it can’t easily access the former it can quickly get data from the latter. That makes it much easier for customers to retrieve their iCloud data when, for instance, they lose their iPhone, as they don’t have to fret about having lost their encryption keys too.

But Zdziarski believes Apple could provide a fully encrypted iCloud and maintain usability. “Apple has already solved this problem with iCloud Keychain and the way they have a signing circle. A solution like that would mitigate most of the headaches that you’d have to deal with in key management,” he added. “If they sat there and clunked their heads together they could come up with a solution.

“But politically speaking it could create a war with certain federal agencies that use that data on a daily basis.”
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#1806 [Permalink] Posted on 21st November 2016 16:15
www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-35639549

Your Phone is listening to you via your apps!

It all began with a car crash.

I was doing some ironing when my mum came in to tell me that a family friend had been killed in a road accident in Thailand.
My phone was on the worktop behind me.

But the next time I used the search engine on it, up popped the name of our friend, and the words, "Motorbike accident, Thailand" and the year in the suggested text below the search box.

I was startled, certain that I had not used my phone at the time I had had the conversation - my hands had been full.
Had I started to look the details up later on and forgotten? Or was my phone listening in?

Almost every time I mentioned it to people they had a similar story, mainly based around advertising.

One friend complained about a migraine, her first ever, only to find the next day she was being followed on Twitter by a migraine support group.

Another had an in-depth chat with her sister about a tax issue, and the next day was served up a Facebook advert from tax experts offering advice on that exact issue.

Many said they were discussing particular products or holiday destinations and shortly afterwards noticed advertising on the same theme.
Community website Reddit is full of similar stories.
One reporter mentioned his male colleague seeing online adverts for sanitary pads after discussing periods with his wife in the car.
But surely if the microphone was activated and the handset was sending data, battery life would be even worse than it is now and individual data usage would be through the roof?
Tech challenge
I challenged cybersecurity expert Ken Munro and his colleague David Lodge from Pen Test Partners to see whether it was physically possible for an app to snoop in this way.
Could something "listen in" at will without it being obvious?
"I wasn't convinced at first, it all seemed a bit anecdotal," admitted Mr Munro.
However, to our collective surprise, the answer was a resounding yes.
They created a prototype app, we started chatting in the vicinity of the phone it was on and watched our words appear on a laptop screen nearby.


"All we did was use the existing functionality of Google Android - we chose it because it was a little easier for us to develop in," said Mr Munro.

"We gave ourselves permission to use the microphone on the phone, set up a listening server on the internet, and everything that microphone heard on that phone, wherever it was in the world, came to us and we could then have sent back customised ads."

The whole thing took a couple of days to build.

It wasn't perfect but it was practically in real time and certainly able to identify most keywords.

The battery drain during our experiments was minimal and, using wi-fi, there was no data plan spike.

"We re-used a lot of code that's already out there," said David Lodge.

"Certainly the user wouldn't realise what was happening. As for Apple and Google - they could see it, they could find it and they could stop it. But it is pretty easy to create."

"I'm not so cynical now," said Ken Munro.

"We have proved it can be done, it works, we've done it. Does it happen? Probably."

Google responds

The major tech firms absolutely reject such an idea.

Google said it "categorically" does not use what it calls "utterances" - the background sounds before a person says, "OK Google" to activate the voice recognition - for advertising or any other purpose. It also said it does not share audio acquired in that way with third parties.

Its listening abilities only extend to activating its voice services, a spokesperson said.

It also states in its content policy for app developers that apps must not collect information without the user's knowledge. Apps found to be breaking this are removed from the Google Play store.

Facebook also told the BBC it does not allow brands to target advertising based around microphone data and it never shares data with third parties without consent.

It said Facebook ads are based only around information shared by members on the social network and their net surfing habits elsewhere.

Other big tech companies have also denied using the technique.

Coincidence
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#1807 [Permalink] Posted on 23rd November 2016 16:01

 

Israeli firm can steal phone data in seconds

A Cellebrite engineer explains the technology used to unlock smartphones and pull data© Provided by AFP A Cellebrite engineer explains the technology used to unlock smartphones and pull data It only takes a few seconds for an employee of one of the world's leading hacking companies to take a locked smartphone and pull the data from it.

Israeli firm Cellebrite's technology provides a glimpse of a world of possibilities accessible to security agencies globally that worry privacy advocates.

The company has contracts in more than 115 countries, many with governments, and it shot to global prominence in March when it was reported the FBI used its technology to crack the iPhone of one of the jihadist-inspired killers in San Bernardino, California.

There have since been reports that Cellebrite was in fact not involved, and the company itself refuses to comment.

Regardless, it is recognised as one of the world's leaders in such technology.

It can reportedly take a wide range of information off devices: from the content of text messages to potentially details of where a person was at any given moment.

Even messages deleted years before can be potentially retrieved.

A Cellebrite employee opens a drawer where phones are stored to enable researchers to find vulnerabilities to crack into them© Provided by AFP A Cellebrite employee opens a drawer where phones are stored to enable researchers to find vulnerabilities to crack into them "There are many devices that we are the only player in the world that can unlock," Leeor Ben-Peretz, one of the company's top executives, told AFP in English.

But privacy and rights activists worry such powerful technology can wind up in the wrong hands, leading to abuses.

'Cat and mouse'

Cellebrite's technology is not online hacking. It only works when the phone is physically connected to one of the firm's devices.

The company recently demonstrated its capabilities for an AFP journalist.

The password on a phone was disabled and newly taken photos appeared on a computer screen, complete with the exact location and time they were taken.

The phone in the demonstration, an LG G4 run on Google's Android operating system, is a model Cellebrite had already cracked, so the extraction did not take long.

The real challenge, Ben-Peretz agrees, is staying in the lead in a race where phone manufacturers constantly launch new models and update software with ever more complicated security.

It only takes a few seconds for an employee of Cellebrite, one of the world's leading hacking companies, to take a locked smartphone and pull the data from it© Provided by AFP It only takes a few seconds for an employee of Cellebrite, one of the world's leading hacking companies, to take a locked smartphone and pull the data from it In the firm's lab they have 15,000 phones -- with around 150-200 new models added each month.

When a new phone is launched, Ben-Peretz said, their 250-person research team races against competitors to find a chink in its armour, a process that can range from a few days to months.

iPhones present a particular challenge because, unlike many firms, Apple designs everything from the device's hardware to software, making its technology particularly difficult to hack, explained Yong Wang, a professor at Dakota State University in the United States.

Ben-Peretz remains confident his company can crack even the newest iPhones.

"iOS devices have strong security mechanisms that give us a challenge, but if anyone can address this challenge and provide a solution to law enforcement, it is Cellebrite," he said, referring to Apple's operating system.

Legitimate means?

According to Ben-Peretz, there is no phone on the market that is impossible to crack.

"Yes it is getting harder, it is getting more complex," he said. "But we still deliver results and they are results on the latest devices and latest operating systems."

Among the data the firm claims to be able to access are text messages deleted years previously.

The Israeli firm Cellebrite shot to global prominence when it was reported the FBI used its technology to crack the iPhone of one of the jihadist-inspired killers in San Bernardino© Provided by AFP The Israeli firm Cellebrite shot to global prominence when it was reported the FBI used its technology to crack the iPhone of one of the jihadist-inspired killers in San Bernardino "In some devices even if you would format the device and you would believe the data is deleted, still a significant portion of it exists," Ben-Peretz added.

The company sells its products largely to police and law enforcement agencies across the globe, though also increasingly to private firms doing corporate investigations.

It has seen particularly high growth in Asia, multiple times the 15 percent global growth rate, Ben-Peretz said without providing specific numbers.

Rights groups worry that the technology can be used by dictatorial regimes to abuse peoples' privacy.

"Any company, including Cellebrite, has a responsibility to ensure their business activities don't contribute to or benefit from serious human rights violations," said Sari Bashi, Israel advocacy director at Human Rights Watch.

Ben-Peretz said the company vets clients and always respects local laws, but the governments are primarily responsible.

"Take a look at any regime, potential regime around the world: Could you do anything to deprive them from throwing a stone at someone or from driving a car and running over people?

"You can't blame the car manufacturer at that point for delivering a car that was utilised to commit that kind of crime," he said.

Bashi called the comparison misleading as cars are mass-produced.

"A surveillance contract is a bit different. You have a small number of clients and there is an opportunity to ask questions or to ask for a commitment that the technology will not be used for X, Y and Z."

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#1808 [Permalink] Posted on 8th December 2016 09:29
Government spies surveil phones in flight, report says

CNET December 7, 2016


Turns out the skies are not so friendly after all, at least as far as privacy is concerned.

American and British intelligence agencies have been surveilling cell phone use on commercial flights since 2005, according to a new investigation by Le Monde based on documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

As journalist and digital media teacher Dan Gillmor tweeted, it's "another good reason to use airplane mode when you're on the plane."

But just turning on your phone when the plane is above 10,000 feet reveals your location to the NSA, according to 2010 internal NSA newsletter posted by Le Monde. The newsletter starts off with the following riddle: "What do the President of Pakistan, a cigar smuggler, an arms dealer, a counterterrorism target, and a combatting proliferation target have in common? They all used their everyday GSM phone during a flight."

Le Monde goes on to explain how the spy agencies can extract information like email addresses and Skype and Facebook ID data and then correlate it with flight and passenger data to pinpoint a particular user. They can also reportedly see what you're doing on your phone, be it looking through email or using a travel app.

The NSA and British equivalent (Government Communications Headquarters) did not immediately respond to a request for confirmation or comment on the Le Monde report.

Snowden has been living in exile in Russia since 2013 after releasing a trove of documents detailing widespread government surveillance, including the bulk collection of internet user information and phone records.
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#1809 [Permalink] Posted on 27th April 2017 14:02
Are you having issues with your Mobile (in the UK) or other online service?

Major downage for networks like EE throughout UK today. Check here for update or to confirm that it's not your device.

downdetector.co.uk/
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#1810 [Permalink] Posted on 17th May 2017 12:58
haveibeenpwned.com/

Check if you have an account that has been compromised in a data breach.

Simply fill your email address and the site will tell you if your account is associated with anyone that has been compromised.

I tried it to see and it produced one result of an App that the kids had downloaded. Apparently that app for a Toy was compromised and it contained details like name, address, family members and a password :(
Quote:
Breaches you were pwned in
A "breach" is an incident where a site's data has been illegally accessed by hackers and then released publicly. Review the types of data that were compromised (email addresses, passwords, credit cards etc.) and take appropriate action, such as changing passwords.


Another brother said his Muslim Directory subscription/account got hacked too.
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#1811 [Permalink] Posted on 20th June 2017 09:36

Broadband: Understanding REIN and SHINE

 

What are REIN and SHINE?

Repetitive Electrical Impulse Noise (REIN) and Single Isolated Impulse Noise (SHINE) describe interference that can affect the stability and performance of a Broadband service. In both cases, a power source is generating interference in the frequencies used by the ADSL Broadband service.

REIN is where this interference is generated for the duration of use of an electrical device, and will typically result in disconnections or line errors while the device is in use. At its most extreme, REIN may prevent any connection being established at all.

SHINE is where this interference is generated as a burst – when a device is powered on or off, for example. As a result disconnections or line errors may result at the time a device is switched on or off.

What are the effects of REIN and 
SHINE on my Broadband service?

In addition to the disconnections caused by REIN or SHINE you are likely to see a slower speed due to line errors and BT’s automated systems working to counteract the symptoms by restricting the maximum speed you can connect at. Lowering the speed creates a “buffer” to the interference, so it doesn’t cause your connection to drop.

Example causes of REIN and SHINE

Many electrical devices could be responsible for causing REIN and SHINE that affects your Broadband service. Below is a list of some example sources, however many electrical devices have the potential to cause REIN or SHINE:

  • Faulty power adapters.
  • Timed devices, such as central heating.
  • Christmas tree lights (especially on ‘flash’ setting).
  • EPOS and PDQ devices.
  • Railway power lines.
  • Street lights.
  • Roadworks.
  • Faulty set-top boxes, televisions and other appliances.
  • Power cables running close to telephone wiring in the home.

How can I identify REIN or SHINE and 
reduce the effect on my Broadband service?

In the vast majority of cases, the source of interference will be within your own home or business premises. As a starting point, you should ensure your Broadband equipment is connected to an ADSL filter at the BT Master Socket – the socket through which the telephone line enters your premises. Internal wiring can act as an antenna to interference, so eliminating or reducing the length of internal wiring will do a lot to minimise the effects of REIN or SHINE.

An alternative to switching devices off is to use an AM/MW radio tuned to 612Khz - this video shows you how this method works:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=iW0ZXh5pIoA

To find the cause of interference is a process of elimination, once you’ve optimised the physical set up of your equipment look for patterns in when problems occur and determine what device is powered on or becomes active at those times. If you can’t locate any single source power off all electrical devices and switch them on one-by-one, monitoring for the symptoms of interference until you find a source.

If no devices in your premises appear to be causing interference then you will need to look further afield. It is possible equipment of your neighbours’ is causing interference, or there could be a source along the route the telephone line takes from the BT exchange to your premises. If this is the case other people are likely to be experiencing the problems too, so noting the times and days this happens will be useful for determining a potential source (e.g. if the cause is a piece of equipment at a business problems may only occur on weekdays when they are open for business).

If the source is external, but can’t be located and eliminated through talking to your own neighbours, then a fault can be reported to BT by us (and your neighbours should make a report to their Broadband providers too). It is important to note that investigations can be complicated and take many months in some cases, and sometimes ultimately the cause cannot be eliminated. This is because the cause will likely be outside of BT’s control and will require specialist engineers to locate it.

support.zen.co.uk/kb/knowledgebase/broadband-understandin...

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#1812 [Permalink] Posted on 20th July 2017 17:54
I've been sticking screen protectors on for years and am an expert at it, no mater what shae or size,
even curved handsets :)

But I found this to be an easy method that I've never tried before.

Get that perfect fit.

Youtube Video - Halalified (Video Only)

Muftisays Halalified YouTube Script

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#1813 [Permalink] Posted on 31st July 2017 14:37
Anyone on o2? (Mobile network)

Will update in next post later InshaAllah.
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#1814 [Permalink] Posted on 31st July 2017 17:58
www.o2.co.uk/apps/priority

My brother uses this app and gets a Meal Deal every Monday for £1 from a WHSmith and many more offers available too.

He recommended it as some branches sell HMC Certified Chicken Sandwiches together with a drink and a snack.

You'll need an o2 sim card to receive an sms to activate the app (one time only) and then use it for those Halal special offers saving you a lot of money.

There are plenty of Haram offers which are not being recommended at all, but one can make use of the Halal ones.


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#1815 [Permalink] Posted on 10th August 2017 16:52
A new kid on the Block?


en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BLU_Products

By chance I saw a smart phone phablet at a decent price for what I was holding and feeling in my hand and bought it for my daughter.

I loved the phone as soon as I started using it. It was fast, huge memory, large screen and did almost everything I wanted it to. (Although still have to test for more secure apps as there were issues with its security which has now been given the all-clear)

It works on Android and is an American brand (not Chinese like the sales man said)

This model (Vivo 6) gives me the feel of a Premium HTC, the software is a combination of an iPhone, Samsung and HTC although it's closer to HTC more than anything else.

But for a Slim, All Metal, 5.5 inch 64gb memory, 4GB Ram, fingerprint scanner, 3130mA battery, USB C Type, Dual sim option or 1 sim and microSD card - the phone packs in so much and comes with a screen protector and cover, I must say, it is well worth it compared to high end devices.



The BLU Vivo 6

More other designs available for less. Of course they look like copy phones, but I must admit, they aren't too bad.

My Mrs gave up her S7 Edge to go for the iPhone Plus, but decided to return the iPhone within 24 hours, couldn't stand the thing and has also ended up with the Vivo 6. The Edge can be really awkward to hold sometimes, therefore the S8 was a no go area.
(Anyone not used an iPhone or would like to experiance using one, you can buy one from the Apple store or John Lewis and return it within 14 days to Apple or 28 days to John Lewis for a full refund. Just don't scratch it or damage it. you can use it to the full and either understand why I hate them or go back to page 1 of the thread if you don't, not much has changed)

Now we got both, The Rose Gold and Gold Vivo 6 to play around with.

Used £125 (I got mine by chance, grade A)
New £180 on Amazon.
(Reviews)


Personally, picked up the Black HTC 10 - Beautiful phone, but was very disappointed when I saw that most of the HTC software/skin was replaced by Google and I couldn't even download the original HTC apps as they no longer support it :( In the end, returned the HTC 10 and stuck to the HTC One M9. Not too happy with the HTC U either, it's all about Google now :(


HTC One M7, M8, M9 and 10

Oh well! I STILL can't stand Apple, dislike Samsung's UI but can't let go of HTC, so maybe it will be BLU for me too in the near future. Just hope they are as strong and as reliable as you'd expect. Down side to it is the cost of additional gel cases, they ain't £1, more like £7 even from eBay and possible repair charges could be higher. Not sure for those who like to root their phones either, it's too early to tell as it's only just entered the UK a few months ago.
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