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Makkah, Madinah, History, Museum Pictures & Video inside the Kabah

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#256 [Permalink] Posted on 10th July 2012 19:21
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#257 [Permalink] Posted on 23rd July 2012 19:48

"abu mohammed" wrote:
The Golden Ratio PROOF FROM SCIENCE THAT THE KABAH IS AT THE GOLDEN RATIO OF THE EARTH. www.muftisays.com/blog/abu+mohammed/634_03-12-2010/the-ka... This link was going to be added a very long time ago, but unfortunatley the blogs were down at the time. See how perfect Allahs creation is.

 

 

New studies show al-Kaaba as the center of the world


Monday, 23 July 2012 

New scientific studies proved that al-Kaaba is the center of the world because its four corners point exactly towards the four cardinal directions of the compass, therefore, every corner is called after the direction it points to.

“The two main corners of al-Kaaba are the Eastern corner, the “Black Stone”, and the Yemeni corner because they are the two corners built according to al-Kaaba's Ibrahimic foundations, unlike the Iraqi and Levantine corners to which the Quraish tribe added the Hateem,” said Dr. Khalid Babteen, Director of the Research Centre in Islamic Studies at the Umm Al-Qura University, Saudi Arabi.

The Eastern corner carried different names but holds a sole sacred significance; it hosts the Black Stone and marks the starting and ending point of Tawaf (the circumambulation). It is believed that the Black Stone is one of the white rubies of the paradise and pilgrims try to touch the Black Stone or wave at it in case they couldn’t reach it.

Pilgrims meet at the northern corner after passing by the Black Stone. This corner was known by the Iraqi corner because Islamic conquests had recurrently triumphed in Iraq.

“Prophet Mohammed, peace be upon him, used to walk from the Yemeni corner to the Black Stone, touching the Yemeni corner with his right hand and reciting the famous supplication: ‘Our Lord, give us in this world what is good and in the hereafter what is good, and save us from the torment of the Fire.’ Then he used to touch the Black Stone and continue the round,” said Dr. Babteen.

After walking half of the Tawaf round, pilgrims arrive to the western corner. This corner is also known by “al-Shami corner” as Muslims were interested in their conquests and armies in the Levant and Maghreb region and because the corner’s sharp angle points as a compass to that land.

Before ending the Tawaf at the Black Stone corner, pilgrims pass by the Yemeni corner that points to the south and that still carries the name of Yemen, the land that gave Islam great wealth and riches.

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#258 [Permalink] Posted on 24th July 2012 12:35

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#259 [Permalink] Posted on 28th July 2012 01:10

 

New URL 
 

24 July 2012

Assalaamu alaikum,

The new domain for Haramain Recordings iswww.haramain.info . Kindly spread the word of the change amongst your friends and all over the internet, on Facebook, Twitter, etc please. Jazakallah khair! 


http://www.haramain.info/2012/07/new-url.html


_________________________________________
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#260 [Permalink] Posted on 31st July 2012 10:05

 

 

 

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#261 [Permalink] Posted on 4th August 2012 20:23
The door of the Kaaba remains one of history's mysteries



Thursday, 02 August 2012

Since it came into being and till now, it is still one of the mysteries of history. It is the door of the Kaaba. There is no documentation of its initial shape or what its builders looked like. There is, however, one indisputable historical fact: the Kaaba had two doors for a long time.

"Today the door of the Kaaba rises above the surface of the Grand Mosque with about two meters and 20 centimeters. Its current height is three meters and 18 centimeters. The thickness of the door, including height and breath, is 222 centimeters long and 171 centimeters wide," Nizar al-Shaibi of the al-Shaibi family (custodians of the Kaaba) said.

Tending to the Kaaba's door is an honor many Islamic rulers throughout different eras were keen to get. They used to write their names under the 99 Names of God and they have never spared their gold and silver when it came to the Kaaba's door. The door and its key are tended to by al-Shaiba, the keepers of the key in accordance with Prophet Mohammed's will.

"The custody of the key always goes to the eldest of our family then passes to the next eldest and so on. We have the key of the Kaaba and the shrine of Prophet Ibrahim. We enter the Kaaba and clean it with rose water. We wait for the governor who starts the cleaning process followed by the guests he brings with him. They wipe the walls of the entire Kaaba followed by the walls," Abdul Qader al-Shaibi, head key-bearer of the Kaaba said.

The components of previous doors of the Kaaba are kept in several museums as Islamic treasures. King Khaled bin Abdul Aziz was the ruler who gave the most to the Kaaba's door.

"This door was commissioned by the Custodian of the Two Holy Shrines King the late King Khaled bin Abdul Aziz. It consists of gold block manufactured in Saudi Arabia. Quranic verses and King Khaled's name were engraved on the door," Dr. Ahmed al-Morei, professor at Umm al-Qura University said.

The door of the Kaaba is sacred for one billion and a half people across the globe. The rest of the planet's inhabitants eye this door with reverence and appreciate its beauty while always looking for an answer to the mystery.

The Kaaba is one of the most venerated places for Muslims. That is why they always give it a special care particularly as far as cleaning it. The Kaaba, clad in the best of silk attires and adorned with a door of gold, is a piece of art.

english.alarabiya.net/article...02/230035.html
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#262 [Permalink] Posted on 6th August 2012 09:53
The Ottomans and the city of Mecca



Located about 45 miles from the coast, Mecca was an important trade center
for the Arabian Peninsula. The person holding the post of sharif was responsible
for law and order in the holy cities and for the safety of the pilgrims.
NIKI GAMM ISTANBUL - Hürriyet Daily News

August/04/2012

After the Ottoman sultans acquired the title and position of caliph, they felt responsible for the upkeep of Mecca and the pilgrimage

In 1517, the Ottoman Sultan Selim I turned his attention toward the Mamluks who ruled an area that extended from northern Syria to the Arabian Peninsula from their capital of Cairo. He had decisively defeated the Persian shah and had been irritated to find that the Mamluks had been supporting the Persians against him. But he justified his campaign on the grounds that the Mamluks were too weak to ward off the aggressive Portuguese who threatened the Arabian Peninsula with its holy cities as a result of their activity in the Indian Ocean and Red Sea. The sultan entered Cairo in January 1517 after a fierce battle in which the Ottomans prevailed. At that time he also took the title of caliph which had been the prerogative of the Mamluk sultan up until then.

Some months later Sultan Selim and his army proceeded to conquer Mecca and Medina, the holy cities, but he never fought a battle because the sharif (governor) of Mecca presented him with the keys to the cities. On August 29, 1517, Selim was officially proclaimed caliph by the sharif. The title of caliph originally meant successor, that is, the successor to the Prophet Muhammad. It became the title designating the highest post in Islam. For centuries it was held by the strongest political ruler.

An important trade center

Located about 45 miles from the coast, the city of Mecca was an important trade center for the Arabian Peninsula. Under the Ottomans, the city of Mecca continued to be governed by the sharif. The person holding the post of sharif was responsible for law and order in the holy cities and for the safety of the pilgrims; however, his resources were far from meeting all of the needs of the city. That is where the caliph came in. The Ottoman sultans took the position of caliph very seriously and maintaining it became a matter of pride and prestige. When it was discovered during the reign of Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent (r. 1520-1566) that the foundations were insufficient to meet all of Mecca’s expenses, more such organizations were established to provide aid.

At the beginning, the Ottomans only cared that Mecca and the area around it were quiet and what was due in the way of taxes was collected and spent as it ought to be. But in the 17th century, that began to break down as Ottoman preoccupation with its European holdings took hold. Instead of the military being in charge, the empire appointed bureaucrats to take charge.

On top of everything, the Ottoman sultan felt responsible for any repairs that might be necessary for the Kaaba and other monuments. These were essential because of floods, earthquakes or fires. In 1626 heavy rains and flooding caused three of the four walls of the Kaaba to collapse. The following year the sanctuary was rebuilt and to help protect it in future, a golden rainspout was installed and a gutter was added.

Organizing the annual pilgrimage also fell to the Ottoman sultans and much, if not most of the preparations were carried out by the women in the harem. The emir al-hajj (commander of the hajj), usually a military man, was appointed to be in charge and he was responsible for ensuring that everything was ready to be loaded on camels, horses and mules for the journey. He would be entrusted with the gifts and money (gold coins usually) that would be sent to the sharif of Mecca.

Women in harem

The women in the harem were responsible every year for sewing and embroidering the silk cloth (kiswa) that would cover the Kaaba. Traditionally its color was black and the embroidery on it was gold thread. The writing was, and still is, chosen from verses in the Quran. Once completed, it would be placed in a decorated carrying case and loaded on a camel that had been especially chosen for the honor of taking the cloth to Mecca.

Pilgrims traveling from İzmir, the European side of the empire and Uzbeks from Central Asia would join the pilgrimage in Istanbul. This great caravan would leave from Üsküdar with a heavy escort but not before a magnificent ceremony was held at Topkapı Palace. Another caravan, coming from the East, would join the one from Istanbul at Damascus.

Suraiya Faroqhi writes in “Pilgrims and Sultans” that at the end of the 16th century, 60 camels were set aside for pilgrims who were poor and of these 20 would carry food. Camels were also provided to carry water barrels just in case water couldn’t be found on the road. In addition, in the 17th century we learn that at least 349 camels were set aside for the use of influential people. This must have been a truly impressive sight.

http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/the...&NewsCatID=438
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#263 [Permalink] Posted on 6th August 2012 10:39

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#264 [Permalink] Posted on 6th August 2012 10:45

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#265 [Permalink] Posted on 8th August 2012 12:36

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#266 [Permalink] Posted on 8th August 2012 12:36

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#267 [Permalink] Posted on 8th August 2012 17:15
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#268 [Permalink] Posted on 9th August 2012 23:27
Anyone knows the deal behind this rendered picture and model?



These are most likely never to happen, but can you imagine the size of those skyscraper minarets.


"The construction of the prophet's mosque is associated with the Prophet's migration. When the Prophet Mohammed (peace be upon him) headed to the heart of Medina, he passed by tribes who were rushing to welcomehim.Someof them took the reins of his camel but he interjected saying "let it go, it has been commanded," until his instructed camel sat down in a place called 'al-Mirbad.' The next day, the Prophet (PBUH) demanded to purchase the land and build the mosque there," says Dr. Abdul Basset Bader, an advisor at the research and studies center of the Medina.

That was the first architectural challenge that the Prophet's precincts faced: changing thedirection of the "Qibla" (the direction that should be faced when a Muslim prays) from Jerusalem to Mecca, from the north to the south. It almost characterized the rebuilding era especially as it was not only a house of worship, but almost likea court and a home for strangers too.

"The city grew and the number of the population increased to an extent where the mosque could no longer accommodate them all. Therefore the Caliph Omar suggested expanding the mosque, but he was keen that it would be similar to the one built by the Prophet." Bader says.

During the era of the Prophet (PBUH), few modifications were made to the Prophet's Mosque. These modifications were proposed by some companions who flocked from countrieswith more advanced civilization than the people of Medina, or Yathrib as it was known before the advent of Islam, and this is what opened the door for the subsequent developments in the mosque's architecture and space.

"Throughout the Rashidi era and the reign of the Khalifa Uthman Ibn Affan, the companion of the Islamic Prophet, the architecture had evolved and stones were then used for construction in most of the city, so Uthman advised to renew the mosque's architecture because it is the house of God, and said he would not leave it to be built with clay, so he consulted his companions and they agreed with him," explains Bader.

It is interesting to note, that despite the prevailing architecture in Yathrib that depended on the burnt clay, the walls of the Prophet's Mosque were made by clay that was not burnt, blocks that were not exposed to fire, because the purpose of the mosque and its landlord is to keep the people away from the fire of the afterlife.
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#269 [Permalink] Posted on 10th August 2012 16:01



 

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#270 [Permalink] Posted on 10th August 2012 16:11

"abu mohammed" wrote:

 
Pilgrims traveling from İzmir, the European side of the empire and Uzbeks from Central Asia would join the pilgrimage in Istanbul. This great caravan would leave from Üsküdar with a heavy escort but not before a magnificent ceremony was held at Topkapı Palace. Another caravan, coming from the East, would join the one from Istanbul at Damascus.

 

subhanallah, when reading how hujjaj traveledto perform their hajj in those days kinda makes you thankful how easy it is now. though at the same time the sight of a cravan starting out for hajj hundreds or thousands of miles away, then slowly getting bigger and bigger as more hujjjaj caravans merged with the main ones travelling along the main route, must have been amazing. Allahu Akbar!

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