Create an account
Most Reputable Members

Makkah, Madinah, History, Museum Pictures & Video inside the Kabah

Jump to page:

You have contributed 2.0% of this topic

Thread Tools
Post New Topic Reply Filter by poster  
Topic Appreciation
Appreciate
The following members appreciate this topic: muslimah101, queenie, amelita, rizmalek, sweetmuslimahk1, Yasin, abu mohammed, Seifeddine-M, ummi taalib, member2, Cloudy, icedude786, Taalibah, Acacia, Jinn, AishaZaynap
163 guests appreciate this topic.
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
19025
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5378
#391 [Permalink] Posted on 8th January 2018 09:02
Private museums open in Madinah 
to promote Islamic heritage

 

Friday 5 January 2018

MADINAH: Since the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) began issuing licenses to private museums, several have opened in Madinah.

In Dar Al-Madinah Museum, visitors and researchers can learn about the life of the Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him), Islamic civilization and Madinah’s urban culture.

It is “the first and largest specialized museum of the history and cultural heritage of Madinah and the landmarks of the prophet’s life,” Hassan Taher, executive director, told Arab News.

The museum, which has four main halls, publishes specialized periodicals on Madinah’s history and landmarks, and holds seminars and forums in this field.

The hall on the prophet’s life includes a collection of rare paintings and images of Madinah, and unique collections from Islamic history.

Another hall contains an open courtyard where visitors can enjoy nature and Madinah’s ancient architecture.

The museum has “a highly skilled, informed cadre capable of communicating with the public based on documented sources and real scientific references,” Taher said.

The team includes speakers of seven languages, including Arabic, English, Turkish and Urdu, he added.

Visitors include Madinah residents, Umrah and Hajj pilgrims, official delegations, families, university students and schools from outside and inside the city, he said.

The museum is located on King Abdul Aziz Road in Madinah Knowledge Economic City. It is open Saturday to Thursday from 9.00 a.m. to 8.00 p.m. The entry fee is SR25 ($6.70). 

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1219401/saudi-arabia


 
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
Site Support
Please DONATE generously towards Muftisays

We spend hundreds of hours ensuring you receive a quality service from this site. We do not fall into the advertisement schemes as all the ads contain elements of Haraam including Haraam Islamic links. Please consider setting up a £1 monthly donation. May Allah (swt) reward you.

abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
19025
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5378
#392 [Permalink] Posted on 21st February 2018 08:52

The Holy Kaaba 
in the past












 

report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
abu mohammed
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
Joined:
6th Oct 2008
Longevity:
28%
Location:
London
Posts:
19025
Gender:
Brother
Reputation:
5378
#393 [Permalink] Posted on 14th March 2018 09:14
Eve’s tomb in Jeddah
— myth or reality?

 

Tuesday 13 March 2018

JEDDAH: The claim that the tomb of Eve, mother of mankind, is in the Cemetery of Eve in central Jeddah has sparked a controversy.

During a tour to the graveyard, Arab News learned that it is difficult to locate the tomb of Eve and to determine the exact date of her death. Some accounts claim that Eve was buried in this cemetery, while many academics stress that there is no reliable evidence to back this claim.

The cemetery is in Ammaria neighborhood in the center of Jeddah. According to elderly residents, it dates back thousands of years. But Mohammed Youssef Trabulsi, who authored a book on Jeddah and its history, explained that all historical references do agree to Eve’s presence in this part of the world at some point in the ancient past but they differ over the exact location of her tomb. However, the cemetery is undeniably ancient, and a number of historians and travelers said that it dates back to the 9th century AH.

Adnan Al-Harthi, professor of civilization at Umm Al-Qura University in Makkah, said the scientific opinion on the issue of the tomb’s existence in Jeddah remains neutral. Al-Harthi said Ibn Jubair, an Arab geographer and traveler from the 6th century AH, said that, during his visit to Jeddah, he saw an old dome said to be the home of Eve. Ibn Battuta, another Arab traveler, also pointed to the presence of the dome during his journey to Jeddah in the 7th century AH.

Al-Harthi said scientific sources confirm that the habitat of Adam and Eve was Makkah, but there is no evidence that Eve was buried in Jeddah.

A number of historians and travelers told many stories indicating that the site of the tomb of Eve is in the same cemetery. Some sources even identified the dimensions of the tomb, and there are drawings of it in books.

Muhammad Al-Makki, a historian, wrote in his book “The True History of Makkah and the Noble House of God” that the Cemetery of Eve used to receive a large number of visitors during the Hajj season. Pilgrims used to go there after Hajj rituals and were exploited by fraudsters who used to sell them some of the cemetery’s soil to take back home.

Despite these tales, some historians doubted the existence of the tomb of Eve in the same cemetery. The contemporary Saudi writer, Muhammad Sadiq Diab, author of “Jeddah: History and Social Life,” said: “There is no legitimate evidence to confirm the existence of the tomb in the cemetery. I think it is just a myth.”

Another old story says there used to be three domes built on one of the large tombs inside the cemetery, and it was believed to be the tomb of Eve. But now there are no domes in the cemetery, all graves are similar, and there is nothing to indicate the tomb’s existence. 

http://www.arabnews.com/node/1264876/saudi-arabia








5 Things About Umm Hawa’s Grave In Jeddah

 



Legend has it that Eve, the first woman created on Earth (peace be upon her), also known as Hawa, was buried in old Jeddah. While there is no absolute archaeological evidence to support this, the legend still remains alive and passed on by generations. Here are some interesting stories related to it.

1. It is estimated that her tomb was around 120 meters long and three meters wide, before its condition began to deteriorate.

2. Even though there is a sign written by the cemetery gate that reads “Eve’s grave,” there are no headstones or names that mark the exact spot that Eve is buried.

3. This was done to prevent people from venerating the site.

4. According to a tale, Jeddah was named after our universal grandmother Eve, since Jeddah means (grandmother) in Arabic.

5. However others argue that Jeddah got its name from its location, and it was originally pronounced “Juddah” which means seashore in Arabic.

https://destinationksa.com/5-things-...rent-aware-of/


 
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
Back to top Post New Topic Reply

Jump to page:

 

Quick Reply

CAPTCHA - As you are a guest, you are required to answer the following:


In the above image: What colour is the text 'Remote' written in?