Forum Menu - Click/Swipe to open
 

Advice for Parents of Hifz Students

You have contributed 14.3% of this topic

Thread Tools
Appreciate
Topic Appreciation
Acacia, abu mohammed, the fake shaykh, Naqshband66, member2
1 guest appreciates this topic.
Rank Image
ummi taalib's avatar
Unspecified
1,664
Sister
1,597
ummi taalib's avatar
#1 [Permalink] Posted on 15th January 2014 20:31
Advice for Parents of Hifz Students: Prospective, Present, and Past
By Nawal Academy



Memorizing the entire Qur'an is a dream many Muslim parents today have for their children. And indeed, this is a goal nobler than many if not all others. However, after children have memorized a number of surahs and perhaps even a juz or two of the Qur'an, there is a question that plagues many parents: how do I know if my child is ready to commit to memorizing the entire Qur'an?


Parents should be aware that doing hifz of the Qur'an is not a small task. It requires a tremendous amount of effort, focus, and dedication on behalf of the student, parent(s), and the teacher. Therefore, when deciding whether or not to enroll your children in a hifz program, you should make sure that you, the child, and the teacher are prepared for this huge and blessed commitment. If the child has a Qur'an teacher, ask the teacher if s/he feels your child is capable of doing hifz of the Qur'an. If the teacher thinks that the child indeed has the focus and persistence needed to memorize the Qur'an and that he does a very good job memorizing surahs, then you may consider enrolling the child in a hifz program. However, first you, the parent, must make sure that you are willing to expend the time and effort needed to support your child during this endeavor. If not, it may not be best to put this responsibility on the child's shoulders. Last, but certainly not least, the child should be asked if he or she is willing to strive to become a hāfiz or hāfiza. If the child says no, then the parent should drop the idea, at least until the child is willing to make this commitment.


Unfortunately, many parents do not follow this advice, which was given by Shaykh Zulfiqar Ahmad Naqshbandi Mujaddidi (db), a very well-known and authentic scholar, hāfiz, and spiritual guide from Pakistan. Parents often force their children to do hifz, when it is not fard (obligatory) on everyone to memorize the entire Qur'an. Children should only be enrolled in a hifz program if they are happy and willing to commit to this blessed task.

Okay, so you decided your child is ready to do start doing hifz. What next?


After children are enrolled in a hifz class, the children's parents and teachers should encourage them and teach him with love, care, softness, and gentleness. When children are taught by someone with these characteristics they soar and reach heights they may have never imagined.


In contrast, under no circumstances should the parents or the teacher beat children for not memorizing or doing well on their lessons. When parents and teachers show children such harsh behavior, there is a danger of them losing their desire to recite the Qur'an and love for Islam. How many students are there who memorized the Qur'an under a harsh teacher and, after completing the memorization, stopped revising the Qur'an and therefore forgot what they had worked so hard to memorize? How many huffāz went on to become astray and began leading a life of sin? There are unfortunately many such cases, and often the reason is that those students had been taught the Qur'an with harshness and force.


It is much better if a child happily memorizes half, or even a juz, of the Qur'an rather than being beaten and forced into memorizing the entire Qur'an.


The following are some additional things the parents of hifz students can do to help their children succeed:

Make du'ā; for your child. Parents' du'ā for their children is extremely valuable and it is the best gift you can give them. Allah سبحانه وتعالى is the only one who can truly help a person in any matter, which of course includes memorizing His Blessed words.

Help and encourage your child to abstain from sins. Light and darkness cannot coexist in the same place. Similarly, by nature, the dazzling radiance of the Qur'an and the darkness of sins simply cannot gather in one place. Watching movies, missing prayers, listening to music, and engaging in other sins are displeasing to Allah سبحانه وتعالى, and this has a detrimental impact on both students' memorization and on their connection with Allah سبحانه وتعالى. However, parents must keep in mind that they should remind children to abstain from sins with love and softness rather than through fear and force.

Be a good role model. When your children see you reading the Qur'an, then they will very likely be encouraged to do the same, Insha'Allah. The same goes for praying salāh, engaging in Allah's سبحانه وتعالى dhikr (remembrance), etc. Engaging in acts of ibādah causes a person's soul to grow, very similar to the way food causes a person's body to grow. A stronger soul will make it easier for your child to memorize the Qur'an, Insha'Allah.

Make sure your child is eating the right foods. It is crucial to make sure that your child consumes only halāl foods. Consumption of harām foods is of course prohibited, and it may negatively impact a person's progress in his or her memorization of the Qur'an. There are several breads, cereals, etc. that contain harām ingredients and we must be very wary of the foods that enter our bodies and the bodies of our children. Also, make sure your children eat nutritious meals, that they maintain a balanced diet, and that they eat a healthy breakfast before class every morning so that they are energized for class, Insha'Allah!

Help your child create a schedule. It is necessary for hifz students to devote at least a few hours every day for their memorization and revision. It is beneficial to create a set time for this task, as it will help ensure that neither memorization nor revision ever gets "skipped." The times after Fajr and after Maghrib are very blessed times for memorization and revision, but any time of the day that is convenient will work, Insha'Allah.

Of course, even if the parents and teacher put their maximum effort into helping a student, if the student is not willing to strive to achieve his or her goals, then there will be very little progress. The following are a few, but not all, of the qualities that should be found in every student willing to memorize the Qur'an. Some of these qualities come with time, so if your children are lacking in any of them, then you and their Qur'an teacher(s) should try your best to patiently and gently instill these qualities in them. Moreover, if you yourself are a person who is striving to memorize the Qur'an, check to make sure you are making an effort to obtain the following qualities:

Sincerity. Hifz students should recognize that the only reason they are memorizing the Qur'an is to please Allah سبحانه وتعالى. Attaining the pleasure of Allah سبحانه وتعالى is the purpose of every mu'min's (believer's) life, and everything he or she does should be a step towards that ultimate goal, Insha'Allah.

Devotion. Hifz students must be aware of the blessing and responsibility that Allah سبحانه وتعالى has gifted them with. They should recognize that memorizing the Qur'an takes a great amount of time and effort and they should be willing to expend that time and effort on their memorization and revision.

Concentration. When hifz students are memorizing their lessons or revising their previous lessons, they should be fully concentrating on what they are reading. All distractions should be eliminated and their attention should be on the blessed words of their Creator.

Self-Discipline. Although parents are most certainly encouraged to remind and help their children practice their lessons, hifz students should recognize that this is their responsibility, given to them by Allah سبحانه وتعالى. They should not need someone to constantly remind them to practice their lessons. They should know that practicing Qur'an may sometimes mean that they will have to wait a couple hours before getting to play or engage in other activities, but that they must finish their memorization and revision before play in order to progress and reach their goals.

Patience. Hifz students should realize that some lessons are not as easy as others and that they might not always see the results of their efforts as soon as they like. Hifz takes time and students should not become frustrated if they are not reaching their goals quickly. Hifz students should know that although memorizing may sometimes seem a little difficult, they should never give up and that their efforts are never done in vain-for any effort to please Allah سبحانه وتعالى is never done in vain. Hifz students should know that if they keep trying their best to perfect their memorization of Allah's سبحانه وتعالى words, Allah سبحانه وتعالى will make it easier for them and allow them to reach their goals, Insha'Allah.

Gratitude. Allah سبحانه وتعالى says in the Qur'an: "If you express gratitude, I shall certainly give you more" (14:7). Although we can never thank Allah سبحانه وتعالى enough for the countless blessings He bestows upon us, when hifz students are grateful to Allah سبحانه وتعالى for allowing them to memorize His blessed words, He will Insha'Allah make it easier for them to memorize the Qur'an. When the great Imām Abu Hanifa (rah) would understand a new concept, he would say "alhamdulillah," and thereafter Allah سبحانه وتعالى would increase his knowledge. Hifz students should make an effort to constantly thank Allah سبحانه وتعالى for all the blessings He has given them, particularly this blessing of memorizing the Qur'an. If possible, they should try to make it a habit to pray at least two nafl (optional) rak'āt salāt-ul-shukr (prayer of thanks) every day, Insha'Allah (however, parents should not force their children to pray these two rak'āt).

Humility. It is natural for students, children and adults alike, to compare themselves to their peers, and sometimes students who memorize the Qur'an begin to think of themselves as better than others. However, it is very important for parents and educators to gently remind students that this opportunity of memorizing the Qur'an is a gift from Allah سبحانه وتعالى and that we have no reason to be arrogant because of it. Allah سبحانه وتعالى does not like arrogance and He can easily take that gift away, God forbid, and give it to someone else instead. Hifz students should be humble and should know that the fact that they are memorizing the Qur'an does not necessarily make them better than their peers. The heavier the fruit, the lower the branch bows. Similarly, the more knowledge Allah سبحانه وتعالى gives a person, the more humble the person should become, as we are absolutely nothing compared to Allah's سبحانه وتعالى infinite greatness.

Perhaps your child has already completed his or her memorization of the Qur'an, whether recently or years ago. Or perhaps you have completed your memorization of the Qur'an. In either case, huffāz must do their best to maintain a schedule of revision. It takes approximately 10,000 focused hours to excel in any field [of] the dunya, which means that it will take at least that much time to excel in a field [of] the deen. Hence, the time spent doing the actual memorization is just the formation of the base-the real excellence in hifz comes much later. Huffāz and their parents alike often forget the importance of regularly revising the Qur'an after the memorization has been completed and students get busy with school and other responsibilities. However, it is crucial for huffāz to remember the gift and responsibility Allah سبحانه وتعالى has given them and, thus, to continue to consistently revise the Qur'an for the rest of their lives-which they will naturally be driven to do if they had a soft, encouraging, gentle, loving, and caring learning experience, Insha'Allah.

Additionally, huffāz are encouraged to acquire knowledge of the deen, to teach the Qur'an to others if they get the opportunity, and to practice upon the Qur'an that Allah سبحانه وتعالى chose their hearts to preserve.

May Allah سبحانه وتعالى keep us on the straight path and may He make it easy for us and our children to excel in memorizing, retaining, and practicing upon the Qur'an with love and happiness. Ameen.

Source: www.sacredlearning.org

Courtesy of Nawal Academy
Note: This article was edited for spelling, grammar, and style.
report post quote code quick quote reply
+2 -0Like x 1Winner x 1
back to top
Rank Image
ummi taalib's avatar
Unspecified
1,664
Sister
1,597
ummi taalib's avatar
#2 [Permalink] Posted on 15th January 2014 20:35
Advice for Students of Hifz

Assalaamu 'alaykum Warahmatullah

I was wondering if the Huffaaz/Teachers of Hifz or those who have children doing Hifz can contribute. I have in mind very young children doing Hifz. Any tips, advices, etc. will be appreciated.
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
back to top
Rank Image
Sulaiman84's avatar
Offline
Unspecified
592
Brother
2,117
Sulaiman84's avatar
#3 [Permalink] Posted on 15th January 2014 20:50

Khalah, when I come back from work I can contribute إن شاء الله.

Did you have any particular questions or issues you wanted to focus on or things in general?
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
back to top
Rank Image
ummi taalib's avatar
Unspecified
1,664
Sister
1,597
ummi taalib's avatar
#4 [Permalink] Posted on 15th January 2014 20:56
I'm so glad you replied Hafiz Sulaiman, Jazaakallah!

Particular questions I have:

1. What kind of schedule can a child (10-12 year old) make - one who has school to attend as well
2. Easy ways to memorise
3. Any special du'as for memorisation?
4. What to do on off days when it just doesn't work

and anything else that can make it easier for the child to memorise on a daily basis
report post quote code quick quote reply
+1 -0Like x 1
back to top
Rank Image
Sulaiman84's avatar
Offline
Unspecified
592
Brother
2,117
Sulaiman84's avatar
#5 [Permalink] Posted on 16th January 2014 02:54
ummi taalib wrote:
View original post


1. From my own experience in teaching hifth over the years, the most effective method in western countries imo is the maktabah system where the student goes to memorize Qur'an in the early morning before going to public school or after leaving public school. Memorizing the Qur'an in the morning is much better, though. The mornings have barakah in them for the Ummah of Rasulullah (saw) and it's a good way to start the day - if possible. The time that should be spent on memorizing/reciting Qur'an varies based on how much Qur'an a student has memorized and their level of proficiency in reciting (nathirah of) the Qur'an. Students who are at the beginners level i.e. learning to read from Qa'idah Baghdadiyyah or Nurani Qa'idah don't really need more than one hour per day with their teacher. Students who have memorized more than a juzz/para i.e. juzz 'amma or tabarak really need an hour at least or more because the need to recite by memory their:

  • new lessons (wajib/sabaq)
  • their recently memorized lessons (madhi qarib/sabaq ki)
  • and their past memorized Qur'an (madhi ba'id/muraja'ah/dur)


Based on the amount that has been memorized, time needs to be taken out for this. Classes should ideally be held throughout the week with a break on the weekends or on one day. Learning to memorize Qur'an in one or two days only (even if it's more than two hours per day) is not sufficient because it breaks the consistency and repetition needed to memorize Qur'an properly. This is observed from experience.

2. There are quite a few ways to memorize. One of the simplest ways is to repeatedly recite (audibly, which is a must because the tongue has to 'memorize' just as the brain memorizes) the portion over and over again, starting from as much as a student can take in reciting an ayah fluently without pausing because of inability to either read fluently, or remember which word comes next. For example, lets take Surah Al-Fatihah. A beginner will repeat the first ayah (alhamdulillahi rabbil 'aalameen) completely or just repeat the first half of the ayah over and over again until it can be read fluently by memory without any mistakes. Once the student gets into the habit of memorizing like that, his quantity (the amount he can memorize) will increase with time, إن شاء الله. But, in order to read fluently, a student must have exceptional skills in nathirah (the ability to read anywhere with ease in the Qur'an by sight). In order to do that, a student must have aced the Qa'idah Baghdadiyyah or Nurani Qa'idah completely without being deficient therein.

3. Best Du'as, as you've mentioned above are from parents. Also teachers should make du'a for their students as well as the students themselves.

4. Let the student have free time and engage them in healthy activities and hobbies such as sports camping, games etc. Their nafs need some relaxing from all that reading. If some free time is not given, then students will take free time at the wrong time (during classes or when they're supposed to do their work) and do wrong things...and nobody wants that.


It's important to have Ta'lim halaqahs in one's house or in the class on the virtues of reciting and memorizing the Qur'an from the Ahadith and commentary from Ulama' so that students, as well as the teachers are reminded of the purpose for all their efforts and so that they don't retrogress and become despondent while making all that effort without the right niyyah and purpose.
report post quote code quick quote reply
+5 -0Like x 1Winner x 4
back to top
Rank Image
Arslan.'s avatar
Unspecified
909
Brother
38
Arslan.'s avatar
#6 [Permalink] Posted on 16th January 2014 03:21
بسم الله الرحمن اللرحيم

(salaam)

Hafidh Sulaiman, what is your opinion on memorization through listening to a qari (while at the same time looking at a mus-haf)? Is it as effective, more effective, or less effective than simply memorizing through your own recitation (i.e. without listening to a qari)? Or does it depend on the student?



report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
back to top
Rank Image
Sulaiman84's avatar
Offline
Unspecified
592
Brother
2,117
Sulaiman84's avatar
#7 [Permalink] Posted on 16th January 2014 03:29
Arslan. wrote:
View original post


I Don't recommend it, except in cases of an emergency scenario or last option. The Qur'an is such an ilm that if one doesn't learn it chest to chest from a qualified Qari, the person is more prone to make major mistakes while not realizing it because he doesn't have a living person to correct him and he only can make corrections by what he perceives to be correct, which (his perceptions) may be wrong to begin with.

So it's mistakes upon mistakes...

But that method is slightly better than reading on one's own. But still, no where near as effective as learning in the physical presence of a qualified Qari.
report post quote code quick quote reply
+2 -0Winner x 1
back to top
Rank Image
Arslan.'s avatar
Unspecified
909
Brother
38
Arslan.'s avatar
#8 [Permalink] Posted on 16th January 2014 03:42
Sulaiman84 wrote:
View original post


JazakAllah. I asked because thats how I regularly memorize. With my secular studies and now arabic, I dont have time to formally learn from a teacher, but alhmadulillah I've memorized a significant portion of the Qur'an by listening to audio recitation (while looking at mus-haf) along side with regular review throughout the day. While doing this, I also fixed up any major flaws in my tajweed through the Quranic Sciences website. In fact, I had recited to a hafidh brother who came over for dinner, and he did not find any obvious mistakes in my tajweed.

That being said, I do agree that it is definitely better to learn sitting beside a teacher, and no doubt Im making minor tajweed mistakes here and there, but its the best I can do at the moment.

Du'aas...

report post quote code quick quote reply
+3 -0Like x 3
back to top
Rank Image
Sulaiman84's avatar
Offline
Unspecified
592
Brother
2,117
Sulaiman84's avatar
#9 [Permalink] Posted on 16th January 2014 04:07
Arslan. wrote:
View original post


Alhamdulillah, you're doing what you can.
report post quote code quick quote reply
+0 -0Agree x 1
back to top
Rank Image
Taalibah's avatar
Unspecified
7,107
Sister
5,405
Taalibah's avatar
#10 [Permalink] Posted on 16th January 2014 05:24
ummi taalib wrote:
View original post

السلام عليكم و رحمة الله و بركاته ummi taalib, my middle son started hifz at a very young age, so it doesn't fit your age category, but I can only share what worked with both of us, doing hifz is like a partnership, finding the child's own way of memorizing, and for myself finding a way of teaching and motivating. I took advice from hifz teachers and their advice proved very valuable, some of which has already been mentioned on this thread.

- praying twice a day, early morning always started with going over the previous evenings efforts. Evening was always new memorization....depending on the child's capability, new sabak can range from being one ayah to half a page to one whole page, this naturally increases with the child's ability in technique in memorizing.

- keeping Quran audio praying in the house, as he was quite young he would be playing and memorising without realising, we still use this method now, playing Quran recitation whilst travelling short or long journeys.

- due to his age his concentration level wasn't very good and he would forget how many times he prayed an ayah for memorizing I found he loved playing with the tasbeer counter, so incorporated it into with his praying....30 was always the magic number....he prayed a few words 30 times each, once his recitation was clear, he would recite the ayah 30 times, once that was clear, joined on to the previous stays and prayed 30 times.

- kept dor once a week normally on the weekend, with no new sabak.

- he did get a block now and again, but repitition and patience is paramount, it's not only frustrating for the child, but the teacher cannot show the slightest frustration, just lots of repitition and reassurance.

- i wouldn't recommend a child learning new sabak unsupervised, even if they are fluent in Quran, as ive found they can very easily memorize incorrectly, which is very difficult to undo once imbedded.

-as for advice to parents, I would suggest that hifz only be taken up if the child is going to receive 100% dedication from the parents, as the hifz has to come before I.e. family outings, breaks, leisurely activities, etc.these activities are allowed to take place but only after the hifz has been accomodated. This also priorities the importance of hifz to the child. Same with any type of study especially hifz, as you well know requires much sacrifice, and adaptation to family and home life.

We only managed memorizing 3 juz as well as other main surahs, as due to health issues, complications in his health had to take priority.

Hope this helps إن شاء الله


-



report post quote code quick quote reply
+2 -0
back to top
Rank Image
ummi taalib's avatar
Unspecified
1,664
Sister
1,597
ummi taalib's avatar
#11 [Permalink] Posted on 16th January 2014 08:46
Jazaakumullah, I've only skimmed through it for now due to lack of time but I would like to thank you both Hafiz Sulaiman and Taalibah. I will read thoroughly later inshaAllah and pass it all on for my grandson...I request your du'a for him as he is on the 18th juz and had been struggling in the last couple of juz though this week has been much better, Alhamdulillaahi Rabbil 'aalameen!
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
back to top
Rank Image
ummi taalib's avatar
Unspecified
1,664
Sister
1,597
ummi taalib's avatar
#12 [Permalink] Posted on 16th January 2014 12:07
Read through both posts (Hafiz Sulaiman's and sister Taalibah's)...very helpful, Jazaakumullah! It has brought up another question...


Quote:
keeping Quran audio praying in the house, as he was quite young he would be playing and memorising without realising, we still use this method now, playing Quran recitation whilst travelling short or long journeys[/quote].

The above and also brother Arsalan's question reminded me of something a friend said of how she used to help her son do hifz. Her son used to listen to one of the mashaikh's recitation (Qari Abdul Baasit I think) so what she would do is tape his sabaq from the recital on a separate CD daily and he would listen to it and recite along with it in the evenings and at bedtime. This helped him a lot and Alhamdulillah he completed hifz


Hafiz Sulaiman:
[quote]I Don't recommend it, except in cases of an emergency scenario or last option


What do you think? Its not as though there is no teacher but as an aid? It may help others too inshaAllah

I definitely agree with the relaxation time and at least one day off for children. It would be good if someone had a method of dealing with the "off days" which occur now and then when it seems that the child is struggling.
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
back to top
Rank Image
Sulaiman84's avatar
Offline
Unspecified
592
Brother
2,117
Sulaiman84's avatar
#13 [Permalink] Posted on 16th January 2014 13:04
ummi taalib wrote:
The above and also brother Arsalan's question reminded me of something a friend said of how she used to help her son do hifz. Her son used to listen to one of the mashaikh's recitation (Qari Abdul Baasit I think) so what she would do is tape his sabaq from the recital on a separate CD daily and he would listen to it and recite along with it in the evenings and at bedtime. This helped him a lot and Alhamdulillah he completed hifz[/quote]

This is a good method as an aid for hifth and not a means to an end goal in itself. If a student is doing that along with reciting it to a teacher, then it's very effective.


[quote="ummi taalib]What do you think? Its not as though there is no teacher but as an aid? It may help others too inshaAllah


As long as it's just an aid only and not made into a substitute for a teacher. But in the brother's case, due to his schedule he could not get the time to read with a teacher so that aid would be a last option - which is better than doing it by ones self.

It's just the element of self-study that increase the possibility of making major and minor mistakes is what is dangerous.
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
back to top
#14 [Permalink] Posted on 24th May 2014 07:51
Assalamualikum.

Im having difficulty with my younger brother. Our father past away 10 months ago and wished for younger brother to become Quran hafiz. But ever since the janaza he has slowly declined, he has been at bording school (jamia islamiyyah zambia) for around 11 months. They've now had enough and said he is not progressing. When hes at home with me he seems very interested and wants to become hafiz. I have learned that it is not permissable to force and taken into account all the helpful advice above (jazak Allah). It seems he just doesnt want to be at the bording school or at the local masjid all day, otherwise at home hes fine and is showing interest. I know he needs to be checked upon daily by the Qari and so i decided to keep him home with a similar learning routine (1hour after fajr, breakfast/rest then 8am-10pm, after zhuhr 2hrs, then maghrib to isha, weekends after 1hour after fajr, zhur and maghrib). Im trying to work around his capabilities not to pressurise him too much, ma shaa Allah he is very bright and capable of 1.5-2 para/month with excellent tajweed. I fear hes going to lose interest altogether so have made the decision to do it at home and have him go to the Qari at maghrib for daily check up/correction.

We recognize that its not just about our fathers wish its about the pleasure of Allah alone and regularly discuss this and listen to as much information as possible to keep him interested/determined.

Id like your advice on this.....

Appreciated. JAZAK ALLAH KHAIR
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
back to top
Rank Image
abu mohammed's avatar
London
20,744
Brother
6,884
abu mohammed's avatar
#15 [Permalink] Posted on 24th May 2014 11:12
report post quote code quick quote reply
No post ratings
back to top

 

Quick Reply

CAPTCHA - As you are a guest, you are required to answer the following:


In the above image: What colour is the text 'ABC' written in?