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How to Educate Your Children?

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#151 [Permalink] Posted on 12th January 2019 18:29
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#152 [Permalink] Posted on 12th January 2019 18:35
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Moving in tablighi jamaath for men itself is Mubah umoor (desirable act), it is not even sunnah, then where is validity of ladies leaving their homes for mubah umoor.
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#153 [Permalink] Posted on 12th January 2019 18:42
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السلام عليكم و رحمة الله و بركاته

They can't travel anywhere else (apart from what you mentioned) at all? With a mahram of course.
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#154 [Permalink] Posted on 12th January 2019 18:52

Please only post relevant issues to the current topic, otherwise please start a new topic. Jazakumullah
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#155 [Permalink] Posted on 12th January 2019 23:29
@ Abu Muhammad

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I kind of know what you mean about the repeats of reading a sabak, but there are a few advantages of this. For example, they pick up pace better yet maintain better quality of reciting, they are able to memorize parts of it making future reading easier and one of the most beautiful things is that by repeating their sabak 5 times, they are rewarded 5 times more per letter - so don't take that away from them.


This is my observation from listening to one child in haftee from the UK. Many more subjects need to be tested to draw a definite conclusion.

I learnt that she is never taught by a male teacher, where as I am accustomed to all children being taught by males until they finish Quran or reach 9/10 years old. They say women can't read as good as men so girls should finish Quran by males.

I learnt that they are all taught new sabak as a class in a group whereas I am accumstomed to each child being taught separately as each is at a different place.

In both maktabs sabaks is listened too individually.

I learnt that in the UK maktab they are also taught urdu while in haftee. They should be learning Arabic instead, or being connected to the explanation of the Quran in some way, and then feel free to teach Urdu if there is time.

She has to learn sabak 10 times at home, so yes she reads her past sabak extremely quickly. I suspect this is what leads to very quick recitation, as this becomes a habit. You read it very quickly as you want to finish reading it 10 times quickly so you aren't punished. Then you get accustomed reading very fast. While reading her previous sabak quickly she is making many carless mistakes. She also isn't really reading the old sabak, rather she is kinda saying parts of it from memory as she read it so many times.

When told to read from a juz she hasn't learnt yet, she said she can't read it she hasn't learnt it. That does not make sense as once you have read a couple juz , you should now be able to read from anywhere in the Quran, albeit slowly. Fluency insha Allah will come with each Quran completion.

She tries to read the new pages but she is trying to read too fast so she can't get it read.


Yes the child from the UK maktab can continue reading a few words by heart if the Quran is closed mid sentence, so perhaps there is some benefit in assisting with memorization. But she can't complete the ayah.

With regards to the extra blessings, it depends on if the child is seeing it as a chore to read it 10 times, and if they are rushing thought it and being careless.
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#156 [Permalink] Posted on 13th January 2019 06:48
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That is your personal experience.

But in general, we have positive experiences about these maktabs. The system is evolved after considering previous experiences over a period. We are satisfied with the output.
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#157 [Permalink] Posted on 13th January 2019 07:01
@concerned

This is my report for the similar method of teaching you have negative experience. My children read quran with best tajweed. They have memorized major surah and last juz, of course with tajweed. They know basic fiqh.

They were never taught urdu in the school education. But Alhamdulillah, thumma Alhamdulillah they read urdu deeni books fluently, which is a remarkable achievement for me. Because all our deeni books originally are in Urdu, There are limitations in translations in English.

Shaykh Ali Mian Nadvi RA had repeatedly emphasized on teaching urdu to our children in sub-continent and there are lengthy lectures on that.
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#158 [Permalink] Posted on 13th January 2019 07:03
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That is the fatwah by ulema, they can't even come out of their homes. Yes, you have the right to ignore that fatwah. But ulema are not withdrawing that fatwah.
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#159 [Permalink] Posted on 13th January 2019 17:32
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Because all our deeni books originally are in Urdu, There are limitations in translations in English.

Shaykh Ali Mian Nadvi RA had repeatedly emphasized on teaching urdu to our children in sub-continent and there are lengthy lectures on that.


I wouldn't expect those who plan to stay in the subcontinent to rely on English translations as opposed to Urdu. I would still like for them to be exposed to the Arabic language.
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#160 [Permalink] Posted on 13th January 2019 17:39
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Alhamdulilah. Once there is a good system and a proper syllabus is adhered too that is great. If possible, starting from young, I would like to see a system where 'school' and 'maktab' are combined, and equal emphasis is placed on all of the subjects.
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#161 [Permalink] Posted on 26th January 2019 01:54
Insha Allah more Ulama realize this and speak about it and start implementing it.

Read full article by Maulana Yusuf Shabir "Is The Parallel Education System Contributing To The Decline Of The Muslim Ummah?"

islamicportal.co.uk/is-the-parallel-education-system-cont...

Efforts to tackle this through Makātib, Tablīgh, Madāris and similar projects are welcome and necessary; however, this in itself is not sufficient to change the tide without a fundamental reform of the education system across all the Muslim countries. What is required is a unified integrated single education system that recognises its legacy, adapts to the needs of the 21st century, necessitates participation for all its subjects and is based on Islamic values and principles.

Another negative consequence of the parallel education system is the artificial segregation between ‘religious’ and ‘secular’ education. In Islam, there is no such segregation. The divide is between beneficial and non-beneficial knowledge. The superiority of the knowledge of the Qur’an and Sunnah and religious knowledge is undoubted. However, the knowledge of what is commonly known as secular or worldly sciences is not prohibited. In fact, Shaykh al-Islām Mufti Muḥammad Taqī ʿUthmānī states that it is farḍ kifāyah (a communal obligation) to acquire knowledge of the worldly sciences because Islam is a comprehensive religion and way of life. Thus, some of the Prophetic statements regarding the virtues of beneficial knowledge apply to all the sciences that benefit others. He adds that this artificial segregation has resulted in an unhelpful division between two groups of people that find it difficult to relate to and interact with each other.

It is important to review our history and recognise that the education system should be an integral part of Muslim life and is intrinsically linked with our spiritual, physical and intellectual strength. Our legacy includes examples of great scholars who were well versed in the Islamic sciences as well as other sciences. They include Ibn Rushd (Averroes), Al-Khwarizmi (Algoritmi), Al-Razi (Rhazes), Ibn Khaldun and others whose contribution is acknowledged by non-Muslims. The example of the companion of the Prophet ﷺ Zayd ibn Thābit (may Allah be pleased with him) who mastered Hebrew and Syriac within a short period demonstrates the artificial nature of the divide. Edicts of earlier scholars prohibiting studying at certain institutions or studying a particular language were due to the inherent risks of western influences in a specific context and not due to the inherent negativity of the subject matter per se.

The absence of a comprehensive education system has undoubtedly contributed to the overall decline of the Ummah. What is required is a fundamental shift in approach; from a parallel system to an integrated single national education system that is balanced, inspired by our legacy, adapted to the modern context and one that is underpinned with religious values and principles. Undoubtedly, this needs to be thought through and involve educationalists, anthropologists, historians and scholars. What surprises me is the contentment of most people with the current parallel system and the absence of a discussion on the alternative. A well thought through integrated education system can strengthen the Muslims spiritually as well as in other ways. An integrated single education system would ensure that every Muslim has the knowledge and practical experience of the fundamentals of Islam. Religious education could be intertwined with other sciences until the age of 16 or 18. Thus, every Muslim would be grounded with an Islamic mind-set and be conscious of his identity and religious responsibilities. Thereafter, pathways could exist to further specialise in Islamic sciences or to pursue a ‘worldly’ science. Whichever pathway is chosen, Muslim students would possess a good foundation in various disciplines including in Islam, languages, mathematics and other sciences that will help further their aspirations. It would also enable change of pathways should one fail to succeed or have a change of heart. Currently, this is not possible in many countries. This would also reduce the divide between the liberal and secular sections of the community and the religious minded sections of the community. This is a gradual process and over time, this would have material impact in strengthening the state of the Ummah.
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#162 [Permalink] Posted on 26th January 2019 06:14
Medical system and engineering are parallel system.

Electrical engineering and electronics engineering are parallel system.
0.001% are in deeni taleem and they are targeted for not learning state of art technology. What do the rest do.





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#163 [Permalink] Posted on 26th January 2019 06:48
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What is being discussed here is quality scientific education in islamic environment.

In India quality education is being offered by christian or hindu institutions. Here in preschools, OM shanti om is taught. In christian schools, nudity is practiced. all good teachers are employed by these schools and are well paid. these institutions have inherited very good infra structure.
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