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Islamic faith school guilty of sex discrimination

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abu mohammed
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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 13th October 2017 14:24
www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-birmingham-41609861

Birmingham Islamic faith school guilty of sex discrimination

 

An Islamic faith school's policy of segregating boys and girls is unlawful sex discrimination, a court has ruled.



The case was heard at the Court of Appeal as Ofsted challenged a High Court ruling clearing the Al-Hijrah school in Birmingham of discrimination.

Ofsted's lawyers argued the segregation left girls "unprepared for life in modern Britain".

Appeal judges ruled the school was discriminating against its pupils contrary to the Equality Act.

However, the court did not accept the argument the school's policy had disadvantaged girls more than boys.

The appeal judges also made it clear the government and Ofsted had failed to identify the problem earlier and other schools operating similarly should be given time "to put their houses in order".

About 20 schools - Islamic, Jewish and Christian - are thought to have similar segregation policies.

The three appeal judges heard boys and girls, aged four to 16, attend the Birmingham City Council-maintained Al-Hijrah school, in Bordesley Green.

But from Year Five, boys and girls are completely separated for lessons, breaks, school trips and school clubs.

In 2016, Ofsted ruled the school was inadequate and it was put in special measures, saying its policy of separating the sexes was discrimination under the 2010 Equality Act.

In November, High Court judge Mr Justice Jay overruled the inspectors, saying that they had taken an "erroneous" view on an issue "of considerable public importance".

Speaking after the Court of Appeal ruling Amanda Spielman, Her Majesty's Chief Inspector of Schools, said educational institutions should never treat pupils less favourably because of their sex.

"The school is teaching boys and girls entirely separately, making them walk down separate corridors, and keeping them apart at all times," she said.

"This is discrimination and is wrong. It places these boys and girls at a disadvantage for life beyond the classroom and the workplace, and fails to prepare them for life in modern Britain," she said.

In the ruling, the appeal judges said Ofsted had made it clear if the appeal succeeded, "it will apply a consistent approach to all similarly organised schools".

Given their failure to identify the problem earlier, the education secretary and Ofsted had "de facto sanctioned and accepted a state of affairs which is unlawful" and should give the affected schools time to "put their houses in order", the judges said.

The ruling means state schools which segregate pupils risk being given a lower rating by Ofsted. It only applies to mixed-sex schools.

During the appeal hearing, Peter Oldham QC, speaking for Al-Hijrah's interim executive board, said the boys and girls at the school were treated entirely equally while segregated.

He said Ofsted did not claim separation was discrimination until 2016 and its actions were "the antithesis of proper public decision-making".

Birmingham City Council said it took the High Court action it had because it felt Al-Hijrah school had been held to a different standard than other schools with similar arrangements, which had not been downgraded by Ofsted as a consequence.

Colin Diamond, corporate director of children and young people at the Labour-run council, said the case had always been about fairness and consistency in the inspection process.

"We would therefore highlight comments made in this judgement about the secretary of state's and Ofsted's 'failure to identify the problem'," he said.

He added the council had a strong history of encouraging all schools to practise equality but if it was national policy that schools with gender separation were discriminating against pupils then local authorities and the schools needed to be told so they knew the standards they were being inspected against.

Matt Bennett, shadow cabinet member for children and family services, said the verdict did not reflect well on Al-Hijrah, the council, Ofsted or the DfE.

"It is now clear that practices breaching the Equality Act 2010 have been allowed to continue at this school, and others across the country. Action is now required at local and national level," he said.
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Ryder
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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 13th October 2017 20:01
Without a hint of irony, the Court of Appeals have ruled in favour of Ofsted in a row over “gender segregation” in schools in the same week as a BBC investigation revealed shocking institutional failures surrounding an explosion in child-on-child sexual abuse in mixed schools across the country.

www.islam21c.com/politics/segregation-of-boys-and-girls-i...
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#3 [Permalink] Posted on 13th October 2017 20:31
Ryder wrote:
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Not withstanding the fact that research study after research study has shown children perform better in state schools that have segregation.

A decade or so ago it was a major headline in the papers and on the News channels about the amazing results being achieved in State Schools .

But when Muslims do the same it becomes discriminatory.

The issue is there is concerted to take away the Hayah of the muslim woman... Remove her Hayah you destroy the foundations of Islam. Everything else is just window dressing.

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#4 [Permalink] Posted on 13th October 2017 20:35
Ryder wrote:
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Yep, and their main objective is:
Quote:
"This is discrimination and is wrong. It places these boys and girls at a disadvantage for life beyond the classroom and the workplace, and fails to prepare them for life in modern Britain"

This is life in modern Britain? To expose children to the reality of filth and Haram!
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#5 [Permalink] Posted on 13th October 2017 20:35
As point of example one of the papers Telegraph with major headlines about sex discrimination at al Hijrah posted the following story only a week ago. On the benefits of "same Sex Classes".

Best of both: Are 'diamond schools' the future of education?

Guy Kelly
5 OCTOBER 2017 • 6:00AM
It is an age-old discussion had by parents all over the country as their children near the end of primary school. What would be the best option for secondary – single-sex, or co-educational?

The arguments for and against each system will be familiar, and backed by enough evidence (both of an anecdotal and academic kind) to reasonably conclude either way. Study after study has long suggested teenagers do better in single-sex classes, where there are fewer distractions presented by the opposite sex, for instance. On the other hand, some see co-eds as vital to the social development of a child, allowing them the chance to grow up comfortable around the other sex, building mixed friend groups and adequately preparing them for university and adult life.

It’s a dilemma, but for some fortunate parents, that “either/or” is becoming a thing of the past, as a small but increasing number of schools are presenting a third option: both?

students lewestone
Kate Reynolds, head of the senior school at Leweston, with some students CREDIT: LEWESTONE SCHOOL
The so-called “diamond” model of education, as it is known, generally involves mixed classes in lower or prep school years, before moving to single-sex academic lessons (albeit mixed for all extracurricular activities outside the classroom) between the key adolescent years of 9 and 11, and then co-ed again for sixth form. Together, apart, back together – hence the diamond.

In science, boys tend to step forward and leap into experiments, while girls prefer to step back and watch. By separating them, we are levelling that out
Kate Reynolds, Head of Leweston Senior School
It is presented as the “best of both worlds”, and proponents would say it’s borne out by impressive results. In August, for instance, one of the diamond model’s proudest advocates, New Hall School in Chelmsford, scored its best ever GCSE results – 54 per cent of grades at A* or A – after being named the TES Independent School of the Year in 2016.

“I think the results we’ve had are as a direct result of students experiencing accelerated learning through the model, once the pressure of stereotypes has been taken off by single-sex classes and distraction is removed,” says Katherine Jeffrey, New Hall School’s principal. “The core curriculum, teaching staff and content, is all identical, but teachers can tailor their lessons to the different approaches, and students can feel more comfortable without the distraction.

“As a general rule, we find that boys have higher energy levels and less concentration when they begin lessons, so might require some hands-on interaction tasks at the start, for instance, while girls don’t need that. Without stereotypes, too, no one is afraid of certain A-level choices – that English and modern languages are for girls, maths and science are for boys – or think something might not be for them, thanks to their gender.”

While New Hall and most of the dozen or so other schools that use a version of the diamond structure apply segregation to all lessons at secondary level, the latest adopter, Leweston School in Dorset, will be using it for only certain subjects.

leweston school
A science class at Leweston CREDIT: MILLIE PILKINGTON
Starting in September 2019, the school will switch to the diamond model only for Stem subjects, maths, biology, chemistry and physics – areas where they believe pupils can most benefit from single-sex teaching. For decades, various studies have suggested the low proportion of women taking Stem subjects at university is due to a lack of enjoyment at school, and whether that’s the boys’ fault of not, staff at Leweston hope the shake-up can improve that.

It’s like multiple schools in one. It’s true to say that not every child is suited to every school, so to have the best of both options in this makes a lot of sense
Liz Richardson, Head of Berkhamsted Girls
“The decision came from quite a lot of research into how we could offer both options, and how we could create the best learning environments in those subjects where boys and girls act differently, especially at that age,” says Kate Reynolds, head of the senior school at Leweston. Reynolds, who teaches English, is confident there is no need for segregation in humanities or arts, where ideas and creative discussion mean “synthesising ideas” is different from science and maths.

“In science, the research we had showed that boys tend to step forward and leap into experiments, getting the equipment and getting involved, while girls prefer to step back and watch. By separating them, we are levelling that out, as well as making it easier for teachers to plan lessons that get the most out of the time.”

For Milli Hill, whose nine-year-old daughter, Bess, is currently in the prep school at Leweston, the announcement was a welcome one.

“It was alarming at first, but now I think it’s very progressive, and shows that the school will evolve in the future,” she says. “Hopefully, it’ll make sure Bess has the chance to have her voice heard, growing in confidence even in subjects like science.”


For all its success and backing, shifting to the diamond model can be expensive to implement, which may hold back a widespread restructuring. Schools need to have the sufficient size for the scale of economy involved in dividing classes up to make sense, for instance, meaning the most common adopters have been institutions amalgamating separate boys and girls schools, or single-sex schools introducing pupils of the other sex for the first time.

Berkhamsted School in Hertfordshire, a product of a merger in 1996, has used the diamond system for more than 20 years, and sees it as a major attraction to parents. “It is a definite strength we have here, and something the parents like. A lot of people might be reluctant to send their children to single-sex schools because they don’t want two separate schools to deal with, but this is a successful solution that works, I think, even better,” says Liz Richardson, the Head of Berkhamsted Girls.

“Administratively, there are fewer conflicts for parents, and this means it’s like multiple schools in one. It’s true to say that not every child is suited to every school, so to have the best of both options in this makes a lot of sense.”
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#6 [Permalink] Posted on 13th October 2017 20:38
abu mohammed wrote:
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It does not put those at Eton, Harrow and other private Schools where the rich send their kids at a disadvantage only when its muslims.

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#7 [Permalink] Posted on 14th October 2017 08:24
Bismillah

Getting tougher and tougher for Muslims.
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