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Mumtaz Qadri Hanged.

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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 19:38
RAWALPINDI: Mumtaz Qadri, an Elite Force commando convicted of killing former Punjab governor Salman Taseer, was executed at the Adiala Jail at around 4.30am on Monday, police said.

Qadri shot Taseer 28 times in broad daylight in Islamabad’s Kohsar Market on January 4, 2011. He was sentenced to death for assassinating Taseer on Oct 1 the same year.

Mumtaz Qadri, the killer of Salman Taseer.—Reuters/File
Mumtaz Qadri, the killer of Salman Taseer.—Reuters/File
Qadri said he killed Taseer over what he called the politician's vocal opposition to blasphemy laws of the country.

His mercy appeal was rejected by President Mamnoon Hussain.

“I can confirm that Qadri was hanged in Adialia jail early Monday morning," senior local police official Sajjid Gondal told AFP.

A prison official confirmed the execution of Qadri.

Related: Qadri confesses killing Taseer, says he acted alone

Cries were heard from inside Qadri's house as hundreds of men and women gathered, and mosques could be heard broadcasting news of the execution, an AFP reporter there said.

“I have no regrets,” Qadri's brother Malik Abid told AFP, tears rolling down his cheeks.

He said the family had been called to the prison Sunday evening by officials who said Qadri was unwell.

But when they arrived, he greeted them with the news that authorities had deceived them, and that his execution was imminent.

“We started crying, but he hugged us,” Abid said.

Two weeks after Taseer was killed, the only Christian minister in the federal cabinet, Shahbaz Bhatti, was gunned down in Islamabad. He too was a critic of the blasphemy laws.

In August 2011, Taseer's son was kidnapped from his car in Lahore. Shahbaz Taseer’s wherabouts remain untraced.

Strict security measures were taken in wake of Qadri's execution.—DawnNews
Strict security measures were taken in wake of Qadri's execution.—DawnNews
Strict security measures were taken within the jail premises and a heavy contingent of Law Enforcement Agencies (LEA) personnel were deployed to avoid any untoward incident.

All routes leading to the Adiala Jail were sealed. LEAs personnel were also deployed across the city in view of agitation and protests.

The body of Mumtaz Qadri was handed over to his family members and was moved from the jail under tight security cover.

Qadri's last meeting with his family was arranged late on Sunday night.

Qadri's sentencing and appeals
An anti-terrorism court here sentenced Qadri to death on two counts for murder and terrorism in Oct, 2011.

In a 40-page statement submitted to the court, Qadri said at the time Taseer’s statements in support of Asia Bibi, a Christian woman charged with blasphemy, had provoked him to kill the governor.

Profile: Salman Taseer

The Supreme Court of Pakistan in October last year maintained the conviction of Mumtaz Qadri by an Anti Terrorism Court, overturning Islamabad High Court's (IHC) March 9 verdict, which had dismissed Qadri's appeal against his death sentence under the Pakistan Penal Code (PPC) but accepted his plea to void the Anti Terrorism Act's (ATA) Section 7.

The government had approached the apex court for including the terrorism charges as a second offence in the punishment.

The court warned at the time that in Islam a false accusation can be as serious as the blasphemy itself, and that calls for blasphemy law reform “ought not to be mistaken as a call for doing away with that law”.

The Supreme Court dismissed Qadri's review petition against his death sentence in December last year, with the judge heading the bench observing that the petition could neither establish errors floating in the judgment nor blasphemy cha­rges against the former governor.

The trial and appeals process in Taseer murder case lasted four years.

Governor Taseer’s killing was the most high-profile political assassination since former prime minister Benazir Bhutto was murdered in a gun-and-suicide attack on a Rawalpindi election rally in Dec 2007.

Reaction to hanging
Protests were recorded in most major towns of the country against Qadri's execution, with busy routes including the Islamabad Express Highway, Islamabad-Lahore Motorway (M- 2) and GT Road partially or fully blocked due to demonstrations.

Demonstrations were reported from several areas in twin cities.—DawnNews
Demonstrations were reported from several areas in twin cities.—DawnNews
Dozens of Rangers and police in riot gear as well as ambulances were stationed outside Qadri's home in Rawalpindi early Monday, an AFP reporter there said.

Metro bus service in Islamabad was also suspended as protestors occupied the bus track.

The Islamabad Bar Council made a strike call in protest against the hanging.

Traffic disruption due to protests was reported from some Karachi areas, with Malir 15 flyover, National Highway Karachi and Hub River road leading to Balochistan blocked.

Protesters torched tyres against Qadri's hanging in Hyderabad.

Shops and business centres were shut in a town in Nindo Shaher, a town in Sindh's Badin district on a call of different religious parties to lodge protest against Qadri's hanging. Strict security measures have been made in all towns of the district.

The proscribed Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamat (ASWJ) carried out a protest demonstration and chanted anti-government slogans in Muzaffarabad against Qadri's execution.

Meanwhile, as two journalists were travelling to Karachi's Malir area to cover a protest there, the protesters pulled the cameraman out of the car and beat him up. They also damaged the camera and the vehicle.

With additional reporting by Haseeb Bhatti, Abrar Haider, Malik Asad and Hanif Samoon.

www.dawn.com/news/1242637
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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 19:55
Note: The above article claims that Mumtaz Qadri had made an appeal for clemency, and the president of Pakistan rejected it. In actual fact Qadri refused to make any appeal for clemency.

Another thing to note is that if you read the comments posted beneath the article on Dawn website, you will find them completely biased in favour of the execution of Qadri and which in reality are unrepresentative of the sentiments in Pakistan concerning this execution.

The BBC on the article on their website made a correlation between Qadris execution, the banning of Tabligh Jamaat from preaching at universities and campuses, as a sign of this governments hardline approach on religious groups.

It seems possible the attrocities and crimes attributed to TTP will be used more and more to promote a liberal and westernised agenda, by this government in order to appease their paymasters in the west.

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#3 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 21:58
salaam

so he murdered someone and was then hanged after due process according to the laws of the country he was living in.
sounds about right..
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#4 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 22:05
xs11ax wrote:
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He killed a blasphemous person. (Just saying)
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#5 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 22:17
abu mohammed wrote:
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Another aaccount of the story from the independent

Quote:
Pakistan hanged Mumtaz Qadri on Monday, the former police bodyguard convicted of killing the Punjab governor he had been assigned to protect in one of the country’s most high profile assassinations.

Qadri opened fire on Salman Taseer and repeatedly shot him in a market square in Islamabad in 2011 while he was meant to be on guard duty for the governor.

Mr Taseer had been campaigning in support of a Christian woman jailed under blasphemy laws for allegedly desecrating the Quran. He had called for reforms on Pakistan’s harsh blasphemy laws, which impose the death sentence for insulting Islam.

Garlands for killer as Punjab leader is buried
Qadri later told police he killed the governor because he had spoken out against the blasphemy laws. At the time of the murder, thousands of people took to the streets in support of Qadri’s views
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#6 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 22:34
abu mohammed wrote:
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are we not meant to follow the laws of the country we live in. how is this any different?
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#7 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 23:00
xs11ax wrote:
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They dont have any due process in Pakistan. Most of the notorious criminals are politicians, despite their convictions they still end up in power, nor is there any rule of law.

As Abu Mohammed has pointed out this Salman Taseer was a blasphemer...Taseers illegitimate son with an Indian girlfriend Aatish Taseer allegedly made some shocking revelations about his fathers religious views in his book
“Stranger to History: A Son’s Journey through Islamic Lands” a couple years before Taseers assassination.

Taseer and his colleagues did not follow the laws of the country in which they lived in and were ruling over as they say "those who rule b y the Sword perish by the sword" How is this different? You will find out tomorrow, and compare Taseers Janazah were Ulemah across the country refused to perform it.. Finally when the establishment found someone even his close colleagues in his party and ruling government refused to attend.

Despite Taseers Party being the ruling government at the time over 200 Lawyers refused to prosecute the case against Qadri and hundreds of lawyers offered to defend Qadri for free at his trial.

Watch the Tens of thousands that will attend Qadris Janazah Tomorrow.

The stories of Taseer and Qadri are stories of Contrasts one came from wealth and usurped more Wealth in his Political career lived like a King yielded might and power and dined wined in luxury resorts around the world, had an aversion to the deen.

The other came from a humble background despite being in a career were bribery and corruption are the norm, he acquired only what was Halal and tayyab, had deep love for his Deen and Ghayrah concerning it.

The one who yielded might and Power was buried like an outcast...The one with out any status will,
In Sha Allah as you will see, be buried like a King.

These are signs for those who wish to ponder.
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#8 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 23:27
Abdur Rahman ibn Awf wrote:
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salaam

i still dont understand how any of this excuses a person for murdering someone. please explain in the light of quran and sunnah.
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#9 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 23:41
xs11ax wrote:
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Well from what I recall Mufti Abu Naeem and Dr Tahir Ul Qadri took positions that Mumtaz Qadri should not have taken the law into his own hands...! You can watch those videos on youtube.

Whilst there were some Ulemah who took the contrarian view at the time...! There were also some Ulemah who agreed that the blasphemy law has been misused by individuals making false accusations over personal disputes and the like and need to put checks and balances in place to prevent this happening in the future.

My above statement was to explain the reason for the contrasting sentiments of the Public in Pakistan and how this issue has been perceived amongst the masses.

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#10 [Permalink] Posted on 29th February 2016 23:53
Abdur Rahman ibn Awf wrote:
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brother, as muslims we hold everything up to the light of the quran and sunnah. if what he did was within the limits of the quran and sunnah then so be it. if it was not then we need to condemn this act of murder. we are constantly reminded that we as individuals are not allowed to take the law into our own hands, not allowed to commit treachery, not allowed to go against the law of the land. so now when someone is unlawfully murdered then shouldnt we as muslims be condemning this act and not celebrating it?

this thread is the first i have heard about this, so correct me if i am wrong...
mumtaz qadri was the bodyguard of salman taseer.
salman taseer was vocally against the blasphemy laws.
mumtaz qadri killed salman taseer because he was against the blasphemy laws.

is that correct?
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#11 [Permalink] Posted on 1st March 2016 00:48
xs11ax wrote:
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No the issue is not as black and white and straightforward as you are portraying it.

Salman Taseers manner of objection to the Blasphemy Law was Blasphemous.

Salman Taseers had an illegitimate non-muslim son Aatish a journalist who is fiercely anti-Islam. He wrote a couple of years earlier about his father in which he stated that his father never prayed never fasted, drank scotch, he witnessed him eat pork, and his father also admitted that whilst in prison on political charges in his youth when offered the Quran to read he dsecrated in the most disgusting manner (I wont spell that out).

Salman Taseer also supported the Qadiyanis right to full recognition, So when he objected to the Blasphemy Law protecting the respect and honour of Rasool e Akram (s.a.w.) by describing it as "Dark and Evil". Given his previous alleged history and background including the allegation of his own son this created a firestorm.

The Ulemah objected and labelled him a blasphemer....(One of his security men Mumtaz Qadri was a Pious individual who had deep Love for Rasool e Akram (s.a.w.) , his favourite passion was to sing Poetry Naats in praise of Rasool e Akram (s.a.w.) you can watch the videos of him singing those Naats whilst he was in Prison and just before he was executed........ !

Mumtaz Qadri heard his local Ulemah at a religious gathering condemn Taseer for his remarks, he heard the stories about how the Sahabaah responded to blasphemers he heard the reward promised to those sahabah who took action against the blasphemers like the Sahabi Abdullah ibn Um Makhtoom.

Mumtaz Qadri swore to take action and he did.

So you can condemn him if you want....I refuse to do so and regard him as most of Pakistan as a Shahid.

In fairness, the family and friends of Salman Taseers state he was not calling the blasphemy law itself Dark and Evil his sympathisers have stated his remarks referred to how the law was being abused in certain instances.











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#12 [Permalink] Posted on 1st March 2016 01:38
Abdur Rahman ibn Awf wrote:
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salaam

i cannot condemn or approve of anyone or anything in this matter. simply because i do not have the facts and the details.

what i have gathered is that qadri unlawfully murdered taseer without trial or conviction either by the judge of the land or by a muslim qazi ruling by the shariah. he took it upon his own self to hand out capital punishment without giving the accused his day in court. he acted treacherously and against his duties as taseer's bodyguard. from what i have learned from those with knowledge is that this is not even sanctioned by the quran and sunnah, but is in fact against the quran and sunnah. i am not even sure if the punishment fits the crime because as far as i am aware he was not accused of blasphemy himself, but was accused of being against the blasphemy laws of pakistan.

but this is not my main issue. my main issue is the apparent hypocrisy of the situation. we are told by the ulama that we MUST follow the laws of the country we reside in. qadri did not. we are told by the ulama that only a qazi can sentence a person to death. qadri is not a qazi. we are told that all the evidence is scrutinised in the light of the quran and sunnah. did qadri scrutinise the evidence? witnesses are interrogated and their reputation as being truthful is questioned. did qadri investigate the reliability of the witnesses and interrogate them?

if the example of qadri is followed, then many people/groups would be able to justify their actions.
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#13 [Permalink] Posted on 1st March 2016 15:08
Despite a government imposed Media Blackout in reporting the execution of Mumtaz Qadri, and the aftermath. The Funeral of Mumtaz Qadri is perhaps the largest in the history of Pakistan.

Here is a video snippet of the extraordinary numbers in attendance the size of the Janazah is simply staggering youtu.be/swqNon3Awog

The grounds of Liaqat Park were packed, with crowds then spilling out over miles onto the highways, into alleyways across the city... Even though the government had put various checkpoints and across the city to try and limit the number of people arriving to attend the Janazaah.

www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=2...
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#14 [Permalink] Posted on 1st March 2016 15:53
The government has made its masters happy.
But lost its own countrymen.
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#15 [Permalink] Posted on 1st March 2016 18:32
xs11ax wrote:
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Also consider the facts that mumtaz qadri killed him after listening to clerics, who incited him to kill taseer. Millions of people and thousands of scholars called taseer gustakh, which was the cause of his action. He didn't kill taseer because of any personal issues. So hanging him isn't justified, without punishing or taking into account those millions who were the cause of this action.
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