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The Role of the Blessed sahabah in settling Mumbai (Thane) & The Arabs of India.

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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 20th August 2014 09:35
(salam)

(bism1)


At Tayyib wrote:

A great deal of research by Maulana Mohammed Faruq Qasmi (Maharashtra) into the role of the Sahabah in settling Mumbai. The first group of Sahabah arrived on the shores of India in the year 15 Hijri (636 CE) and anchored on the port of Thane. There were a total of 9 Sahabah apart from the Tabieen in this group and their names are listed under:

1. Hakm bin Abi al-‘As Thaqafi رضي الله عنه

2. Hafs bin Abi al-‘As رضي الله عنه

3. Mughira bin Abi al-‘As Thaqafi رضي الله عنه

4. Sinan bin Salamah Badhli رضي الله عنه

5. Suhail bin Adi Ansari رضي الله عنه

6. Sahar bin Abbas Abdi رضي الله عنه

7. Asim Amr Taimi رضي الله عنه

8. Hakm bin Umar Ghifari رضي الله عنه

9. Abdullah Ansari رضي الله عنه

Some interesting facts were brought to light on how the Sahabah reached the shores of Mumbai from Bab ul Hind (ie. Bahrain). The author recommends the Muslims of India to get in touch with the Nagpur office of the Archaeological Survey of India, to further research on the settlements of the Sahabah in Maharashtra. A few years back in Chanchi Dhanau area of Thane, five copper arrows were excavated which had the details of the Muslim population and the name of their leader appointed by the local Raja.

The full article was published in Nida-e-Shahi magazine of Jamia Shahi Muradabad, in the following issues

November 2012 Page 50 onwards

December 2012 Page 50 onwards.
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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 20th August 2014 09:41
dr76 wrote:

Great info masha Allah..

The book Aab e kauthar by Maulvi Muhammed Ameen sahab of Pakistan is a part of three series- Rood e Kauthar and Mauj e Kauthar..

The opening pages of Aab e kauthar deals with the advent of Arabs on Indian soil.. the sahabah also landed along the coastal side of Maharshtra namely Ratnagiri coast and karnataka.. ie.. Bhatkal and also parts of kerala on the coast..

They were followed by Taba'een and more Arab traders and Auliya later on.. also there were Banu Hashim who fled from the atrocities of Hajjaj bin Yousuf .. then migrations from Hadhramaut and other parts of Hijaz..

Nawayaths (Nawwati meaning sailors in Arabic) is name given to these the Arabs who settled there and did not marrry the local women to preserve their bloodline.. and those who did marry on the kerala or Tamil nadu side are known as Labbe or bearys

These people (Navayath) are Shafi'i in Madhab and have distinct Arab features.. many have retained the Arabic family names that are still found in Hadhramout and Hijaz..

The lowly self is amongst their unworthy sons..
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#3 [Permalink] Posted on 20th August 2014 09:52
(bism1)


dr76 wrote:

The Milli Gazette published this report


The Navayaths of India - An Arabian lake in an Indian ocean

By Aftab Hussain kola.

The mention of the name Bhatkal will invariably conjure before any one the image of Navayaths. They are a significant community among the Muslims and are found living mainly in and around Bhatkal, prosperous little picturesque town with quaint old abodes and villas on the west coast of Karnataka in India.

Navayaths are a distinctly identifiable ethnic Muslim group tracing their progeny to the Arabs. These fair-skinned people belong to the Shafi school of thought. Their main concentration of population is found in small colonies along the coastal tract of Uttara Kannada and Udipi districts of Karnataka with Bhatkal as its most important centre and the biggest settlement of the group. There is hardly any dissension about the meaning of the term.

We learn from the pages of history that the Arabs had established sustained trade relations with India in general and the west coast in particular since time immemorial. Notwithstanding the unanimity that the Navayaths are of Arab stock, the authors however hold divergent opinions about their actual place of origin and the reason for their exodus from the Gulf.

Colonel Wilkes in "History of Mysore, vol 1 (1930)" states that the Navayaths belong to the House of Hashem.

In the early part of 8th century AD during the fearful reign of Hajaj bin Yusuf, the Governor of Iraq under the Caliph Abd-Al-Malik Marwan, many respectable and opulent persons bade farewell to Iraq and fled their homeland fearing persecution. It is believed that they followed the route their fellow Arabs took for trade, anchoring on the west coast at several points.

"While there may be some among the Navayaths whose ancestry can be traced to those who fled Iraq during Hajaj bin Yusuf’s time not all ancestors are of that type", writes Victor D’ Souza in his book "Navayaths of Kanara"(1955).

Continue reading..
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#4 [Permalink] Posted on 20th August 2014 10:12
(bism1)


Jaffer Shariff (Qanoon-e-Islam (1832)), Colonel Wilkes (History of Mysore, vol 1), and the Imperial Gazetteer of India derive Nawayath from the Persian نوآید 'Nawāyad' ("newcomer"). The contemporary Indian historian Omar Khalidi summarizes the modern view, writing that "The various Muslim communities that sprang up on the Konkan coast of India in the seventh century share three common characteristics:

The first is a common origin in the Arabian Peninsula and the Persian Gulf region, second is a common adherence to the Shafi'i madhab, or school of Islamic law . . . and finally the common descent from Arab mariners and merchants.

Among these communities at least three groups came to be called Nawayats. The name appears in a variety of forms in Arabic, Urdu and English, including Nait, Naiti spelled with the letters ta or te. . . . There is controversy among the Nawayat scholars and academic researchers regarding this term. Based on a detailed and sophisticated philological analysis D.V. Chauhan has concluded in his important study that 'the term Navait in the Arabo-Iranian historical sources and also in Indian languages is in fact the Prakritisation of the Arabo-Iranian term "navakidh", meaning shipowners.'

[from a possible combination of "naav" (boat) and "khuda" (lord) from Old Persian, and ancestor of Farsi; "nakhuda" is even today applied to boat captains in Kuwait]. . . .

Regardless of the origin and meaning of the term Nawayat, it is clear that there are three groups of Muslims who are descended from the Arab immigrants and their progeny and dispersed to various parts of western and southern India.

The first group of Nawayats are those who live predominantly in the town of Bhatkal, in North Kanara district in the southern state of Karnataka.

The second group of Nawayats are those who live, among other places, in kilakarai and latter in Chennai (Madras) and Hyderabad. The Chennai and Hyderabad Nawayats are closely linked with ties of kinship and intermarriage. . . .

The third group of historical Nawayats [were] initially called Nawayat but are now known as Konkani Muslims inhabiting the region of Konkan . . . ."[1]


It has been found that Navayaths are scattered in Pakistan, Srilanka (kilakarai), Hyderabad, Tamil Nadu, Nellore, Arcot, Kolar, Hassan, Goa, Daman,Diu and Ratnagiri. These Navayaths unlike the Navayaths of Bhatkal (about whom this article deals with) have totally adopted the local culture and speak Urdu Or the local language.

Navayathi men are generally light skinned,usually with beard. They like to stay with their community people where ever they go. They are generally business minded people . They do marriages among their community. and their attire consists of A shirt and lungi.

Women have generally adopted the local way of dressing, however they observe strict Burkah (Islamic Veil). Anklets and nose studs are not a common practice. In fact its discouraged.

source..

The Navayath from Bhatkal still do not marry outside the society.. as is common with Hadhrami tribes.. so u find the most preserved blood lines.. with Malikis.. Alawis.. Aidroos.. Ba faqih.. saqqaf.. Amoudi.. etc.. as family names..

Many have the family tree (shajrah) preserved..

Even at weddings.. the only guy to wear a suit would be the groom.. the grown ups wearing kurta and lungi.. and anyone wearing a pant shirt is understood to be an outsider.. ( though some youngsters may be seen wearing it)

The Hyderabadi Navayaths are relatively new.. as u can read here.. they were a military people serving under the Nizam and now settled mainly in the Barkus area of Hyderbad where they are known as Chavush.. they have also adopted the local customs.. and speak urdu..

The Navayaths scattered away in Rajhasthan.. or further to pakistan etc.. have mingled with the local populace.. so they cannot be called as true navayaths..

Note: Kokan generally refers to the kokan coast ie, the western coast of India facing the Arabian sea..along the Maharashtra state coast down to karnataka state.. ending at Mangalore coastline.. the people speak a dialect known as konkani or kokni..
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#5 [Permalink] Posted on 20th August 2014 10:20
The Hadhrami influence in Hyderabad


In India, after Kerala, the Hadharem have been very influential in Hyderabad. Ever heard of Major General Sayyid Al Aidroos of Hyderabad? He was the commander-in-chief of the Hyderabad State army in 1948; that is the same year that India, annexed Hyderabad.

After India became independent in 1947, Hyderabad, which is right in the middle of India, and long ruled by Muslims princes - wanted to remain independent. The Union of India, would have none of that; and so, India invaded and annexed Hyderabad. On the 18th of September, 1948, General Aidroos surrendered to the Indian army.

Of the surrender, General Aidroos said: “The men under my command were called to perform a superhuman task… there was no alternative for me left but to surrender.” Al Aidroos's brothers and relatives, had important posts, too, in Hyderbad before the annexation.

Sayyid Al Aidroos, is the author of one of the most popular books about historical Hyderabad - his autobiography: 'Hyderabad of the Seven Loaves'. Al Aidroos, was of Hadhrami descent.

Sayyid Al Aidroos was also involved in the 1940s - in the training of soldiers in Aden, and the British handling of the very destructive famine in Wadi Hadhramaut. After India's annexation of Hyderabad, the Hadharem there and their descendants, experienced years of marginalization and were in a way segregated.

It was not until the 1970s when Saudi Arabia's oil boom started and many Hadharem from Hadhramout and other parts of the world, including from Hyderabad, migrated to Saudi Arabia - that, the fortunes of the Hadhramis in Hyderabad changed; in Saudi Arabia, many Hadramis are citizens and are very wealthy.

The Hyderabad Hadharem easily found jobs in Saudi Arabia and many became wealthy back home. With wealth, the Hadharem could again assert themselves in Hyderabad.

Hydreabad is very important to the history of Hadhramaut. It is through the military involvement and influence of the Hadharem in India, that events back at home in Hadhramaut were very much influenced. The two dominant sultanates in Hadhramout: the Al Qu'aity in Mukalla; and the Al Kathiri in Seiyoun, both, had connections and links to influential Hadhramis in Hyderabad.

The rulers of these two leading and competing sultanates, received lots of financial and military assistance from the Hadhrem of Hyderbad.

That Indian influence extended to even the architecture of Mukalla and, of especially the sultan's palace. Central to the story and lives of both the Hadharem in Hyderabad and the sultanates in Hadhramout, is the influential and later diminishing military careers of the Hadharem in India.

The story of the Hadharem and Muslims in Hyderabad, is also central to the history of that state; a state which was ruled by Muslims for long, but had a majority Hindu population. Hindus who were eventually the main driving force for the annexation of Hyderabad and its subjugation.

Hyderabad still has a large Muslim population making about 40% of the whole; of whom, many are Hadrami Arabs. After the independence of India and the annexation of Hyderabad, the not well educated, semi-skilled, Hadhramis who were only used to military posts, found themselves lost; and economically and socially weak.

Thanks to the opportunities in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf, today, many of the Hadharem families in Hyderabad have at least one of their own who has migrated to Saudi Arabia or the Gulf countries - to seek economic improvement; a few have migrated to Hadhramaut. Back in Hyderabad, many are now involved in small scale businesses and a few are farmers.

The Hadharem and their descendants, like in many other parts of the world where people of Hadhramaut have migrated, maintain their identities through: marriage, and the staging of traditional practices during and on religious occasions; and during births, weddings and funerals; and also through music and cuisines.

At the same time, Hadhramis are very good at integrating; and they have assimilated well with the local people and culture of Hyderabad. Today - although some Hadhramis from Hadhramaut still go to Hyderabad to marry, most of the Hadahrem in India have lost touch or contact with their ancestral homeland of Hadhramaut; and it is very rare to find a Hadrami in Hyderabad, especially one of their descendants, speaking Arabic - they, like their fellow citizens, speak Telugu or Urdu; or Hindi or English.

Source.
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#6 [Permalink] Posted on 20th August 2014 10:28
The Hadhrami Influence in Kerala and Beyond.......


It is reported that Arabs traded with the Indian sub-continent, Southern Asia and the Indian Ocean islands long before the emergence of Islam. Whenever we think of the State of Kerala, in south-west India, we associate it with tropical greenery and tourism; anyone who has moved around the Middle East, especially the Gulf countries, will have met the very many guest workers from Kerala, mainly Malayali.

In India, Kerala is unique in many ways: it is not only very rainy, green, has many varieties of animals and fauna and with a very captivating topography and scenery; Kerala too, in India: has the highest literacy rate, has one of the highest Human Development Index, is one of the least corrupt, has one of the best health care services in the developing world, has the highest life expectancy rates in the country and has the lowest population growth rate in the country.

Very few people, especially outside Kerala, know of the very close ties and history between the people of Kerala and Arabs; Arabs from Hadhramout in particular.

For the last 3,000 or so years, Arabs, including the Hadharem, and people from Kerala - have been trading with each other. In the 7th Century or so, Islam was introduced to Kerala. Today, about 25% of the people of Kerala are Muslims, many of whom are Arabs or of Arab descent; most of these Arab Keralites, descended from the Hadhramis.

Dr. Hussain K Randathani writes: Among the Arabs it was the Hadramis who made major step in the Indian Ocean migration which became intensive during colonial period.

They as missionaries and traders were very particular in upholding Islam in all walks of life and that was the main reason for the spread of the religion as well as trade in the region. He writes further: the migrant hadramis engaged in trade, commerce, shipping, shipbuilding, scholarship, missionary activities, diplomacy and even local politics.

This was achieved through indigenization of the migrant Arabs through marriage of native woman and adopting native culture. It is therefore not at all surprising that many of the national heroes of the region as well as local ruling houses were actually Arab in origin.

Another researcher - Zubair Hudawi, has this very absorbing article 'Hadrami diaspora in Indian Ocean territories, with special reference to Malabar' in which he writes: The history of Islam, especially in the whole Indian Ocean littoral, and the entire Islamization process of the eastern frontiers for at least last one Millennium, is inseparably mixed with the Arabs from Hadhramawt of Yemen.

Today, not only in Kerala and India, but wherever there are Muslims in South-East and Southern Asia, the influence of the Hadharem can be seen. And descendants of people from Hadhramaut can be found; most of these Hadhrami descendants do not speak Arabic and have never been to Hadhramaut.

Source
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#7 [Permalink] Posted on 20th August 2014 10:32
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#8 [Permalink] Posted on 30th October 2015 16:59
(salam)

(bism1)


The Arab settlers from 1st century at Gujrat


Pic shared by Bro Fake Shaikh


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#9 [Permalink] Posted on 31st October 2015 16:38
We joke with our bhatkaly brothers; Bhatkal got detached from Saudi; floated, moved and got attached with Indian sea shore.

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#10 [Permalink] Posted on 20th September 2016 11:38
Islam Reached the Shore of Konkan in
636 CE, During Umar رضي الله عنه's Caliphate


By *M. Burhanuddin Qasmi

One of our student groups from Markazul Ma’arif Education and Research Centre (MMERC), Mumbai is on a 40-day trip at Shrivardhan, a township in Raigad district of Konkan region in Maharashtra state of India. We went to meet them on 3rd day of Eidul Adha (15 Sept. 2016). Shrivardhan is 200 kms. from Mumbai, the capital city of Maharashtra and the financial capital of India.

Our students, who are all graduates and in the 22 - 25 age group, enthusiastically informed me saying, "Sir, there is a masjid named Sharie Masjid, local elders say it was built during the caliphate of Hazrat Umar رضي الله عنه in 15 Hijri i.e. around 636 CE and they also say there are graves of Sahaba - companions of Prophet Mohammad (saws) in this township – Shrivardhan!”.

I replied “Yes, they are right, Islam reached here in 15 Hijri and there might be graves of Sahaba رضي الله عنه in this locality”. I also informed them that I had done a study in the year 2004 following my visit to one of the oldest and India's first masjid, the Cheraman Jama Masjid, in Kodungalloor, Kerala. I visited the area following the historic tsunami in 2004 with relief goods from Markazul Ma'arif (NGO) and Jamiat Ulama-e Hind.

It was inscribed on the masjid's stone marker, that it was built in the life time of Prophet Mohammad (saws) in 9 Hijra or 629 CE. That curved year on the stone marker inside the masjid and its architectural design made me do a deeper study about the origin of Islam in India, where I found that Arabs used to frequently visit India through Malabar, Konkan, present Daman and Diu and Gujarat on the shores of the Arabian sea in the pre-Islam and post-Islam era, as traders.

They stayed and even did married with the locals. Some never returned back to Arabia. Some have their progeny till date in these coastal areas of India.

When the Arabs embraced Islam, they took their new faith with them to all the places where they visited for business. Therefore, it is right that Islam reached India with Malik bin Dinar رضي الله عنه in 9 Hijri (628/29 CE) itself via Malabar Coast. And later gradually Muslim Arabs visited other Indian coastal areas in succeeding years. Thus Islam reached here by 15 Hijri year when Hazrat Umar رضي الله عنه was the Caliph in Madinah.

Kodungalloor was the capital of the ancient kings of Kerala and from 622-628 CE (Hijra 2 to 9) the ruler of the realm was a great savant called Cheraman Perumal Bhaskara Ravi Varma. It is recorded that he accepted Islam and visited Madinah. On his way back through Yemen his ship sank and he died. This is one of the major incidents in the early history of Indian Islam.

Following my study in 2004 I have compiled an article "Origin of Muslims in India" which was published by some newspapers and magazines in India and abroad. The same can be Googled till date for reference by interested readers.

So I informed my young scholars that the local scholars and elders are right. Islam reached the shore of Konkan in the very early days of this new religion and history records it that there are graves of Sahaba رضي الله عنه in Konkan, say present Shrivardhan, but unfortunately no historian could say with certainty which grave is of a Sahabi of Prophet Mohammad (saws) and what's its exact location in Konkan.

I also expressed my interest and said to them, 'So let's go and visit the Masjid-e Sharie where locals say there are graves of Sahaba of Prophet of Islam (saws)”. We walked through the narrow streets from Shrivardhan Jama Masjid and visited the graveyard in the vicinity of the small but very prominent Masjid-e Sharie. The masjid is built just on the bank of a small track on the Arabian Sea. The look and the surrounding scene is of course magnificent and very cooling for the eyes.

*M. Burhanuddin Qasmi is Editor of Eastern Crescent and Director of Markazul Ma’arif Education and Research Centre, Mumbai.
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