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#136 [Permalink] Posted on 29th October 2014 11:11
رَبَّنَا مَا خَلَقْتَ هَذا بَاطِلاً سُبْحَانَكَ فَقِنَا عَذَابَ النَّارِ


Rabbana ma khalaqta hadha batila Subhanaka faqina 'adhaban-Naar


Our Lord! Not for naught Hast Thou created (all) this! Glory to Thee! Give us salvation from the penalty of the Fire
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#137 [Permalink] Posted on 9th November 2014 21:48
Fantastically Bright, Green Meteor In Japan Caught In Amazing Videos
JESSICA ORWIG NOV. 4, 2014, 12:33 PM

The evening of Nov. 3 had a big surprise for people in Japan: A big, bright meteor streaked across the sky, giving locals an absolutely stunning light show.

You can see the green and orange light of the meteor as it falls toward Earth. These colors are likely due to the presence of magnesium and sodium in the meteor itself that produce green and orange light, respectively, when subjected to extreme heat.

The celestial event took place over western Japan and was reported within a couple of hours of a series of US meteor sightings across the East coast.

In Japan, cameras at the Fukuoka airport caught this amazing footage.

These light shows are likely rogue meteors from this month's ongoing Taurid Meteor Shower.
Interesting fact about meteors falling to Earth is that Earth actually gains weight from meteor dust.
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#138 [Permalink] Posted on 11th November 2014 20:41

Rosetta's Comet Is Singing and You Can Listen To It Here

 

Listen to it! That's Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko singing. This cosmic song was just discovered by the European Space Agency, which released the soundtrack for our enjoyment. It's totally new and unexpected, say the scientists who will remotely land a probe on the rocky surface of the comet tomorrow

 

(This link might not work, but you can go two posts below and listen)

Rosetta's Plasma Consortium (RPC) consists of five instruments on the Rosetta orbiter that provide a wide variety of complementary information about the plasma environment surrounding Comet 67P/C-G. [...] The instruments are designed to study a number of phenomena, including: the interaction of 67P/C-G with the solar wind, a continuous stream of plasma emitted by the Sun; changes of activity on the comet; the structure and dynamics of the comet's tenuous plasma 'atmosphere', known as the coma; and the physical properties of the cometary nucleus and surface.

But one observation has taken the RPC scientists somewhat by surprise. The comet seems to be emitting a 'song' in the form of oscillations in the magnetic field in the comet's environment. It is being sung at 40-50 millihertz, far below human hearing, which typically picks up sound between 20 Hz and 20 kHz. To make the music audible to the human ear, the frequencies have been increased by a factor of about 10,000.

The music was heard clearly by the magnetometer experiment (RPC-Mag) for the first time in August, when Rosetta drew to within 100 km of 67P/C-G. The scientists think it must be produced in some way by the activity of the comet, as it releases neutral particles into space where they become electrically charged due to a process called ionisation. But the precise physical mechanism behind the oscillations remains a mystery.

"This is exciting because it is completely new to us. We did not expect this and we are still working to understand the physics of what is happening," says Karl-Heinz Glaßmeier, head of Space Physics and Space Sensorics at the Technische Universität Braunschweig, Germany.

Source

Personally, I think its the wind. Afterall, it is travelling faster than fast! Or its the noise from the Probe

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#139 [Permalink] Posted on 11th November 2014 21:19
Allah says: “All that is in the heavens and on Earth glorify Allah.” [Sūrah al-Hashr: 1]

Allah says elsewhere in the Qur’an: “Everything in the heavens and on Earth glorifies Allah.” [Sūrah al-Jumu`ah: 1]

Allah also says: “The seven heavens and the Earth and all they contain glorify Him, and there is not a thing but extols His glory; but you do not understand how they glorify Him.” [Sūrah al-Isrā': 44]
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#140 [Permalink] Posted on 12th November 2014 11:14
abu mohammed wrote:
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Youtube Video
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#141 [Permalink] Posted on 12th November 2014 11:21
abu mohammed wrote:
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Amazing that these sounds were recorded, not sure if it sounds either like music or anything recognizable.
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#142 [Permalink] Posted on 12th November 2014 11:25
Taalibah wrote:
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Quote:
Personally, I think its the wind. After-all, it is travelling faster than fast! Or its the noise from the Probe[/quote]
But then I think to my self, there is no wind in space, or is there? :)

[quote]Allah says: “The seven heavens and the Earth and all they contain glorify Him, and there is not a thing but extols His glory; but you do not understand how they glorify Him.”
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#143 [Permalink] Posted on 12th November 2014 14:32
Its definitely not wind. Space is a near perfect vacuum.

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#144 [Permalink] Posted on 12th November 2014 16:27
Probe makes historic comet landing

European robot probe Philae has made the first, historic landing on a comet, after descending from its mothership.

The lander touched down on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at about 1605 GMT.

There were cheers and hugs at the control room in Darmstadt, Germany after the signal was confirmed.

It was designed to shine a light on some of the mysteries of these icy relics from the formation of the Solar System.

"This is a big step for human civilisation," said Jean-Jacques Dordain, the director-general of the European Space Agency (Esa).

Shortly after the touchdown was confirmed, Stephan Ulamec, the mission's lander chief, said: "Philae is talking to us... we are on the comet."

The robot deployed harpoons to fasten itself to the 2.5-mile-wide ball of ice and dust.

Scientists will use Philae to take pictures of the comet's landscape and to analyse its chemical composition.

They are hoping the its surface materials will hold fresh insights into the origins of our Solar System more than 4.5 billion years ago.

www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30026398
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#145 [Permalink] Posted on 13th November 2014 22:18
Astronomers Caught This Amazing Stellar Pulse With The Hubble Telescope


"Light Echo" Illuminates Dust Around Supergiant Star V838 Monocerotis

Illuminate the universe and you'll see more beauty than you could ever imagine.

That's exactly what a cosmic phenomenon, called a light echo, does.

This Hubble image to the right was taken in February, 2004 and is a consequence of the revealing power of the light echo.

This isn't just a pretty image, though. It's one of many that the Hubble has caught that actually teaches us something new about how our universe works.

We think it's one of the most stunning scientific images we've seen from the telescope because astronomers had to wait nearly two years for it.

That's because before 2002, the only thing we could see in this region was a supergiant star.

But in January 2002, the star, located 20,000 light years from Earth, gave off a blindingly bright pulse of light.

For the brief period of time the pulse lasted, the star was the most luminous star in our galaxy, shining at 600,000 times brighter than our sun.

The star eventually faded, but the light it emitted continued to travel outward, illuminating the star's surrounding nebula, as shown in the animation below.

Our Universe Visualized Animation of a light echo in action

Between May 2002 to February 2004, Hubble snapped five images of the star, shown below. With each succeeding image, Hubble gave us a more beautiful look into this nebulous cocoon.


NASA, ESA, H.E. Bond (STScI) and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)


Series of Hubble images showing a light-echo progression.

What we see if the result of starlight propagating through space and then reflecting off the nebula's gas and dust, just like sounds bounces off of walls in a cave creating an echo-effect. Some of that reflected light heads toward Earth and was detected by Hubble.

Below is a gorgeous simulation showing the full, gradual progression of the most stunning light echo we've ever witnessed.
Youtube Video
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#146 [Permalink] Posted on 18th November 2014 21:30

Revolutionary ALMA Image Reveals Planetary Genesis

6 November 2014

 

This new image from ALMA, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, reveals extraordinarily fine detail that has never been seen before in the planet-forming disc around a young star. These are the first observations that have used ALMA in its near-final configuration and the sharpest pictures ever made at submillimetre wavelengths. The new results are an enormous step forward in the observation of how protoplanetary discs develop and how planets form.

For ALMA’s first observations in its new and most powerful mode, researchers pointed the antennas at HL Tauri — a young star, about 450 light-years away, which is surrounded by a dusty disc [1]. The resulting image exceeds all expectations and reveals unexpectedly fine detail in the disc of material left over from star birth. It shows a series of concentric bright rings, separated by gaps [2].

"These features are almost certainly the result of young planet-like bodies that are being formed in the disc. This is surprising since such young stars are not expected to have large planetary bodies capable of producing the structures we see in this image," said Stuartt Corder, ALMA Deputy Director.

When we first saw this image we were astounded at the spectacular level of detail. HL Tauri is no more than a million years old, yet already its disc appears to be full of forming planets. This one image alone will revolutionise theories of planet formation,” explained Catherine Vlahakis, ALMA Deputy Program Scientist and Lead Program Scientist for the ALMA Long Baseline Campaign.

HL Tauri’s disc appears much more developed than would be expected from the age of the system. Thus, the ALMA image also suggests that the planet-formation process may be faster than previously thought.

Such high resolution can only be achieved with the long baseline capabilities of ALMA and provides astronomers with new information that is impossible to collect with any other facility, even the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. “The logistics and infrastructure required to place antennas at such distant locations required an unprecedented coordinated effort by an expert international team of engineers and scientists,” said ALMA Director, Pierre Cox. “These long baselines fulfill one of ALMA’s major objectives and mark an impressive technological, scientific and engineering milestone.”

Young stars like HL Tauri are born in clouds of gas and fine dust, in regions which have collapsed under the effects of gravitation, forming dense hot cores that eventually ignite to become young stars. These young stars are initially cocooned in the remaining gas and dust, which eventually settles into a disc, known as a protoplanetary disc.

Through many collisions the dust particles will stick together, growing into clumps the size of sand grains and pebbles. Ultimately, asteroids, comets and even planets can form in the disc. Young planets will disrupt the disc and create rings, gaps and holes such as those seen in the structures now observed by ALMA [3].

The investigation of these protoplanetary discs is essential to our understanding of how Earth formed in the Solar System. Observing the first stages of planet formation around HL Tauri may show us how our own planetary system may have looked more than four billion years ago, when it formed.

Most of what we know about planet formation today is based on theory. Images with this level of detail have up to now been relegated to computer simulations or artist’s impressions. This high resolution image of HL Tauri demonstrates what ALMA can achieve when it operates in its largest configuration and starts a new era in our exploration of the formation of stars and planets,” says Tim de Zeeuw, Director General of ESO.

Notes

[1] Since September 2014 ALMA has been observing the Universe using its longest ever baselines, with antennas separated by up to 15 kilometres. This Long Baseline Campaign will continue until 1 December 2014. The baseline is the distance between two of the antennas in the array. As a comparison, other facilities operating at millimetre wavelengths provide antennas separated by no more than two kilometres. The maximum possible ALMA baseline is 16 kilometres. Future observations at shorter wavelengths will achieve even higher image sharpness.

[2] The structures are seen with a resolution of just five times the distance from the Sun to the Earth. This corresponds to an angular resolution of about 35 milliarcseconds — better than what is routinely achieved with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

[3] In visible light, HL Tauri is hidden behind a massive envelope of dust and gas. ALMA observes at much longer wavelengths, which allows it to study the processes right at the core of this cloud.

More information

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international astronomy facility, is a partnership of Europe, North America and East Asia in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. ALMA is funded in Europe by the European Southern Observatory (ESO), in North America by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) in cooperation with the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) and the National Science Council of Taiwan (NSC) and in East Asia by the National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) of Japan in cooperation with the Academia Sinica (AS) in Taiwan. ALMA construction and operations are led on behalf of Europe by ESO, on behalf of North America by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), which is managed by Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) and on behalf of East Asia by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). The Joint ALMA Observatory (JAO) provides the unified leadership and management of the construction, commissioning and operation of ALMA.

ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 15 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and two survey telescopes. VISTA works in the infrared and is the world’s largest survey telescope and the VLT Survey Telescope is the largest telescope designed to exclusively survey the skies in visible light. ESO is the European partner of a revolutionary astronomical telescope ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. ESO is currently planning the 39-metre European Extremely Large optical/near-infrared Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.

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#147 [Permalink] Posted on 18th November 2014 21:31


This is the sharpest image ever taken by ALMA — sharper than is routinely achieved in visible light with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. It shows the protoplanetary disc surrounding the young star HL Tauri. These new ALMA observations reveal substructures within the disc that have never been seen before and even show the possible positions of planets forming in the dark patches within the system.
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#148 [Permalink] Posted on 18th November 2014 21:32
ALMA/Hubble composite image of the region around the young star HL Tauri



This is a composite image of the young star HL Tauri and its surroundings using data from ALMA (enlarged in box at upper right) and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (rest of the picture). This is the first ALMA image where the image sharpness exceeds that normally attained with Hubble.

Credit:
ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO), ESA/Hubble and NASA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
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#149 [Permalink] Posted on 18th November 2014 21:34

ALMA image of the young star HL Tauri (annotated)

 

This is the sharpest image ever taken by ALMA — sharper than is routinely achieved in visible light with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. It shows the protoplanetary disc surrounding the young star HL Tauri. The observations reveal substructures within the disc that have never been seen before and even show the possible positions of planets forming in the dark patches within the system.In this picture the features seen in the HL Tauri system are labelled.

 

Credit:

 

ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

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#150 [Permalink] Posted on 18th November 2014 21:34

Comparison of HL Tauri with the Solar System

 

This image compares the size of the Solar System with HL Tauri and its surrounding protoplanetary disc. Although the star is much smaller than the Sun, the disc around HL Tauri stretches out to almost three times as far from the star as Neptune is from the Sun.

 

Credit:

 

ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)

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