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Why are countries still using the fake bomb detectors

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#1 [Permalink] Posted on 9th June 2014 20:27
Why are countries still using the fake bomb detectors sold by a convicted British conman?

Pakistani security personnel still guard Karachi's Jinnah airport using versions of Jim McCormick's phoney bomb detector. They are not alone in having a seemingly unshakeable belief in the ADE 651

Pakistani army personnel stand guard following an assault by militants at Karachi's airport.

Monday 9 June 2014 15.47áBST

It is is one of the world's most obvious terrorist targets. So how did a group of 10 militants armed with guns, bomb vests, rocket-launchers and grenades get into Karachi's Jinnah airport? Part of the answer, incredibly, may lie in the fact that Pakistani security personnel still guard the outer perimeter using versions of the phoney bomb detector sold by the convicted British conman Jim McCormick.

McCormick's device, which he called the ADE 651, was itself a variation of a common design. Essentially, a telescopic radio aerial is attached by a hinge to a plastic handgrip. When used by a "properly trained" operator, who must first sensitise it to the "molecular frequency" of explosives, it was supposed to point out bombs by swinging towards them.

In fact, all this was nonsense. The aerial swings because of unconscious movements by the operator, known as the ideomotor effect - the same thing that gives rise to the common belief in dowsing. Nevertheless, McCormick and other fraudsters, such as Gary Bolton, exported thousands to clients around the world, including in Iraq and Pakistan. Less ambitious criminals used to sell them as golf ball detectors in the 1990s.

Like dowsers, though, many security personnel continued to keep the faith. In 2010, even after McCormick had been charged with fraud, Pakistan's Airport Security Force admitted to the Dawn newspaper that they were continuing to use a device of their own design that operates on the same principle.

Iraq, which had been McCormick's largest market, still uses them too, despite repeated warnings. In 2009, the New York Times confronted bomb squad commander Major General Jehad al-Jabiri with evidence of the ADE 651's fraudulence, yet he insisted that it was effective, saying: "Whether it's magic or scientific, what I care about is it detects bombs." In 2011, al-Jabiri was charged and later jailed for - of all things - taking bribes from McCormick. And still the ADE 651s were being used, as recently October 2013.

At the same time it was apparently common to find Beirut security guards still scanning cars for explosives with an ADE 651, or something similar. And there are reports of other devices being used in the south of Thailand. Indeed, according to Detective Sergeant Steve Mapp, who led the investigation into McCormick, some people's belief in the ADE 651 is almost unshakeable. As he told Business Week, "In Kenya they said, 'No, we know about Mr McCormick's conviction, but we're really glad we've got them - and they do work.'"

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#2 [Permalink] Posted on 10th June 2014 09:50
Karachi airport is under fresh attack!
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#3 [Permalink] Posted on 10th June 2014 10:01
Sky News wrote:
Gunfire has been heard at Pakistan's Karachi airport training facility - the second attack on the airport in two days.

Ghulam Abbas Memon, a spokesman for the Airport Security Force, says gunmen tried to enter the facility from two different entrances on Tuesday but the security forces were fighting them back.

He did not have any details on the number of attackers or possible casualties.

Pakistani television reported that three militants had been surrounded by security forces at the academy, but no other details were immediately available.

At least four ambulances were seen rushing to the scene.

Pakistan's army said it had deployed troops to reinforce security forces trying to protect the academy.

The militants are thought to have gained access to the site via a slum housing area that surrounds it.

All flights in and out of the airport have been suspended "until further notice," a spokesman for Pakistan's Civil Aviation Authority said.

The attack comes only a day after gunmen laid siege to Karachi's international airport in an attack that left 36 people dead, including 10 Taliban gunmen.

The Pakistani Taliban said the attack was in revenge for their late leader Hakimullah Mehsud, who was killed in a US drone strike in November.

The assault destroyed prospects for peace talks between the Pakistani Taliban and the government of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif and triggered speculation that the army might opt for an all-out offensive against militant strongholds.

Earlier on Tuesday, Pakistani fighter jets bombed Taliban positions on the Afghan border.

"Nine terrorist hideouts were destroyed by early morning military air strikes near the Pakistan-Afghan border," the army's press wing said, adding that 15 militants were killed.

It was unclear if the latest air strikes signalled the start of a broader offensive in the North Waziristan region where the al Qaeda-linked Taliban are based, or indeed if they had been carried out in retaliation for the airport attack.

Meanwhile, seven bodies have been found in a burned-out building at the airport following the previous attack.

The discovery took the death toll from the Taliban attack to 36, including 10 Taliban militants, Pakistani officials said.

The remains of the seven victims, who were burned beyond recognition, were found inside a cold storage unit but it was unclear how they got there or who they were.

Reports suggest they were airport workers who had hidden inside the unit from the fighting but became trapped and burned to death.
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#4 [Permalink] Posted on 10th June 2014 10:45
Why do TTP frequently target airports? Any idea?
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#5 [Permalink] Posted on 10th June 2014 10:48
Black Turban wrote:
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I guess it proves that the most secured place in the country is not so secure and they want to make a point of it!
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#6 [Permalink] Posted on 10th June 2014 11:04
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They haven't released any such statement yet. Regarding yesterday's attack they told that it was to avenge death of civilians, torture of prisoners and assassination of their chief. Airports are used by civilians mostly. They were supposed to attack army camps or police stations instead.
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#7 [Permalink] Posted on 10th June 2014 11:07
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Actually, they aren't supposed to attack anyone!

This is Islam, and Islam has its way and the correct way is the only way. How they do it or implement it is a different story.
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#8 [Permalink] Posted on 2nd July 2014 18:42
A new chapter of oppression by Pakistani government.........

************************************************************************

Pakistan passes tough anti-terrorism law

2 July 2014


Pakistan has passed a law giving security forces sweeping powers to clamp down on terrorism, but many activists and politicians have described the provisions as draconian.

The new legislation adopted on Wednesday grants police officers the powers to shoot and kill alleged terrorists and detain suspects for questioning for up to 60 days without charge.

It also allows prisoners to be held at secret facilities, and the police to carry out warrantless searches.


The legislation, known as the Protection of Pakistan Ordinance, must now be signed into law by the president.

Al Jazeera's Kamal Hyder, reporting from Islamabad, said, parliament passed the bill despite considerable opposition, citing the need to show solidarity with the army and its military offensive.

Tahrira Abdullah, a human-rights activist, told Al Jazeera: "The government of Nawaz Sharif managed to sneak this bill through parliament.
A breakdown of Pakistan's armed groups

"The police and armed forces are now able to shoot people if they see them commiting a crime, or suspect them of wanting to commit a crime in the future. This has huge implications for human rights."

The debate over the law follows months of deadly Pakistani Taliban attacks and this month's offensive by the Pakistani military against sanctuaries in the remote border region of North Waziristan.

Nearly half a million people have fled North Waziristan since the military launched a ground offensive against the Pakistani Taliban late last month.

The new legislation is intended to replace Pakistan's outdated 1997 law, which has been the main piece of legislation used to counter armed grouos in the country.

But Fawad Chaudhry, a media adviser for the opposition Pakistan People's Party, told Reuters news agency the old law had not been used properly and he doubted that this one would be either.

Hundreds of Pakistanis have been held for years in secret prisons without being charged. Extra-judicial killings by the security forces are also common.

"The passing of legislation is hardly a problem. The problem is the implementation," Chaudhry said.
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