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#16 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 20:28
Türk Kızı wrote:
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We call our Qur'aan "Ottoman Script" and it looks like this:



This is what we call "Arab Qur'aan":



Talik script is Nast'aleeq, see sample below...



Türk Kızı wrote:
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Matbu is very close to how we write Urdu normally in handwriting...

I have noticed that the style is different but the alphabets are the same.

Old Urdu or Persian scripts are hard to read for us although we know the Alphabets, its looks the same for Ottoman scripts so if someone was to type the text (using modern fonts) then an Urdu reader will read it fairly easily. This is a simple Urdu writing in print...


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#17 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 20:45
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In this post, i have said that Ottoman Turkish is dead. When i gave a thought to it, it is not entirely correct for several reasons:

  • Ottoman script wasnt used in both public and private anymore but modern Turkish was forced to take words used by Ottoman Turkish. In this sense Kemalist 'purification process ' of Ottoman Turkish failed. Modern Turkish contains words used in Ottoman Turkish.
  • A language is considered 'dead' when nobody uses it. This wasnt the case for Ottoman Turkish.
  • Ottoman Turkish is no different than how Latin is today with some exceptions.

When i said Ottoman Turkish died, i considered how it was used in public and private life anymore. Im really sorry about this, i should have rather said, its usage gone very down and that hardly anyone spoke.

Muadh_Khan wrote:
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This is very interesting. Subhanallah, I didnt know Urdu speakers would refer their Quran print as Ottoman Script. As for Arabic Quran, im not very knowledgeble to say Arabic Quran in the picture looks like Talik script. Im not Ottoman Turkish expert. As for old Urdu and Persian scripts, very interesting. This shows again how similar we Subscontinent Muslims and Turks are. I wish everyone felt the same.
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#18 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 20:49
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Talik in Urdu is known as Nastaleeq. It's a pretty well known font in Urdu.
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#19 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 21:00
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Spell and write these two words in Ottoman Turkish and modern Turkish please?

  1. Muhammad
  2. Aisha
  3. Zaynab


Lets see how they look...

bint e aisha wrote:
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Yep, it does resemble that...
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#20 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 21:07
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Quote:
Yep, it does resemble that...

Both are same.
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#21 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 21:15
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My post corrected, is the sample in the post correct?
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#22 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 21:17
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1) ﻣﺤﻤّﺪ (Muhammed)
2) عاءشه (Ayshe)
3) زینب (Zeynep)

I think Arabic Quran does not look like Talik script (when i check alittle, it doesnt change though that it could be.)

Common Urdu text i saw online look like Nastaleeq (Urdu speakers know better.)
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#23 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 21:25
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Why is the "b" in Istanbul and "b" in Zaynab as "p" in Modern Turkish when in Ottoman script they are both the same letter?
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#24 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 21:25
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Yes correct.

We all learn to write Urdu in Nastaleeq. Hence people find it a bit difficult to read the Qur'an in other fonts.
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#25 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 21:28
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I didnt honestly understand why you have asked me to write Muhammad Aisha and Zainab in both Ottoman Script and Modern Turkish brother?

As for Urdu text written in which script, i learned something new. It was interesting discussion.
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#26 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 21:36
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This question should be also ask to those people who refer Alif as a/e in Turkish? I honestly dont know the reason behind this. Even when you read Ottoman Turkish words like the ones you posted, although there was ain in the word is use we say it as normal a. Letter Qaf is used we say read it as k. I think it goes down to the alphabet reform. In Ottoman Turkish you would know the actual form of the word but when you latinized it, the actual pronouncation of the word got lost.
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#27 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2020 22:31
Ottoman Script Guessing Game: Spot Urdu words



  1. انسان = Human
  2. حر= Free/Independent
  3. عقل= Brain/Intellect
  4. وجدان= Reason/Logic ?
  5. صحبت= Companionship
  6. ذهنيت= Nature, Natural Instinct
  7. حركت= Movement or revolution ?

What did I miss?



Chapter heading in Persian, chapter text in Turkish

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#28 [Permalink] Posted on 31st July 2020 01:50
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I have read Firas al-Khateeb's book "Lost Islamic History" and i have to say it was a very good read. Very well written and very clear and to the point. Only thing is that because it summarises how Islam developed and spread over time, it does not go into a lot of detail, but overall it does give a very good intro into history, especially for a beginner looking to explore Islamic history.
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#29 [Permalink] Posted on 31st July 2020 12:45
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Brother Muadh Khan and all members of MS

Firstly Taqabballahu minna wa minkum. I wish you all joyful Eid.

As for this question, i felt you are were asking why b in Istanbul is b and not b in Zeynep. There is no question of Istanbul being Istanpul. The word Istanbul is originally a Greek word emerged in 1930s. There is nothing wrong with the word Istanbul. I was discussing with a very close friend of mine regarding your question. We came to realized that Ottomans wrote the name Zeynep as Zeyneb. The word Zeyneb was fully taken from its Arabic form without any change. But when alphabet reform took place seems like the name Zeyneb slightly changed and p was added next to it. This is the same case for more Arabic origin names in Turkey.

  • Ahmet
  • Muhammet
  • Nurettin
  • Selahattin
  • Sebahattin
  • Zeynep

These are the ones i know, it is perhaps likely they are many more

It seems like kemalist regime even wanted to erase names. This theory is not something impossible and has a base as in Islam a name has impact on a person but as Arabic speakers know very well, if you change pronounce a word wrong you change its meaning. We Turks may say these are the names of the pious but these are not the original forms of the name of the pious. Maybe in Arabic if we pronounce names this way, it may mean something else. I personally wish i had enough evidence to fully say kemalist regime did such a thing.


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#30 [Permalink] Posted on 4th August 2020 15:11
Asslamualikum wa rahmatullah

Enjoy

Quote:
In this, book, a translation of Turk Nāda se Turk Dānā Tak (The
Turks: From the Unenlightened to the Enlightened), Muftī Abū
Lubābah dāmat barakātuhum has disclosed in detail all the
progress that has been made in Turkey and the threats that the
government and people there face internally and from outside.
This work was published before the unsuccessful attempted
coup d’etat in Turkey
4472-The_Turks,_From_the_Unenlightened_to_the_Enli
Downloads: 4
    [1758.44 kB]
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