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#61 [Permalink] Posted on 9th May 2018 02:24
I have an idea to learn and teach Quranic translation in a fun manner (especially for kids).

Starting from Fatiha and Juz Amma Break each ayah of the surah in single or dual words (if related).

Create flash cards for each word with Arabic word on front and it’s translation on back. Supervise the children to make their own flash cards. Practice memorizing the Quranic vocabulary through these flash cards and then test your memory through doing word for word translation of the ayaat you just memorized through flashcards with their meanings.

If it’s difficult to preserve so many flash cards then create a scrapbook and write Arabic word of an ayah on the front of a page while write it’s meaning on the next page (i.e. The back of the same page).

After learning word for word translation of an ayat, try to rephrase the translation in proper manner.

Caution! Use an authentic word for word translation for this activity recommended by Ulema

If after practicing the tajweed of a surah, the activity above is done by the students under the guidance of a teacher, I believe that from the very beginning children will have this inculcated in their subconscious that Quran is only to be recited beautifully with understanding. This will be the first stage for kids to understand the Quran and obviously a concise tafsir or summary of each surah can be taught and explained later on when the kids have completed reciting and learning the whole of Quran.
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#62 [Permalink] Posted on 9th May 2018 15:30
It would be good to place a picture along with the word.
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#63 [Permalink] Posted on 10th May 2018 09:03
Concerned wrote:
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You mean picture of the word it self for calligraphic accuracy?
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#64 [Permalink] Posted on 12th June 2018 11:53
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A new Technique for understanding, remembering, contemplating and memorising Quran

I have come to realize that understanding the quran is more linked with listening than reciting. While reciting one’s focus is on tajweed where as in listening one’s full focus is on understanding if one knows what is being recited.

Therefore, I have discovered a technique with which I believe that we can understand the meanings of the verses and remember those meanings as well. Also it will help in memorizing the quran.

The technique is very simple.

1. Download the recitation of quran of your favourite Qari in your mobile, mp3 player, pc etc.

2. Keep a hardcover or pdf copy of Quran with translation like “Asaan Tarjuma Quran ka” in the language of your choice.

3. Play the recitation in loop of the surah you want to get acquainted with. Preferably the 30th Juz in the beginning and smaller surahs.

4. Daily keep on listening to one surah repeatedly for at least half an hour while reading it’s translation. (This is slightly different from listening recitation along with it’s translation because now you will be matching the translation with the verses and you will be listening to verses without breaking the flow)

5. After some days the translation will be stuck in your subconscious and whenever the related verses will be heard or recited , the translation will come to the mind. Then obviously the more you practice in nafl prayer like tahajudd the more better you will get at it.

6. For longer surahs you may cut the recitation of each surah in pieces of ten ayaat with an audio editing software like Audacity.

7. After the translation of the corresponding surah or group of 10 ayaat is stuck in your mind, you can memorise those ayaat easily. After that you can move to the next surah or next group of 10 ayaat within the same long surah.

The process is slow but I believe it is effective. This will improve the salah greatly. I believe this will be a stepping stone before committing oneself to learn Arabic which will take years. If not the whole of Quran then at least Juz Amma, Surah Yasin, Surah Rahman, Surah Waqiah and Surah Kahaf should be memorized with this technique. After that one may learn Arabic if one is interested or committed or else keep on continuing with the same technique till the end.

This technique can be applied without the aid of any device if two people team up to practice it. One person will recite the quran and the other will focus on reading the translation corresponding to the recitation.

A group of ten or twelve students can form a Mahdharah to practice this technique which will make understanding and memorizing Quran more easy as there is barakah in jamaat. One student will recite a surah or a passage of a long surah 10 times while the others will be reading it’s translation. Then all the students will one by one recite the same surah or passage for 10 times and the rest of the students will read it’s translation till the circle of student ends and all the students end up reciting that surah. The next day they may do verse by verse translation from memory i.e. They may only recite the Arabic from the hard copy while translating the ayah from memory. Then after inculcating the translation they may memorize the text as well. While understanding what is being memorized there will be two benefits.

1. The memorization because of understanding and repeated recitations will be easier and quicker.

2. Because of understanding the meaning, the translation will start gluing or cementing with the actual matn which means that the more you will repeat the Arabic with understanding the more firmer it’s meanings will stick to your mind automatically.

Update

In order to prevent satan from making the listeners sleepy, each person in the group may recite the surah for once at a time and then the next person starts reciting and so all the members recite the same surah one by one. After the group finishes reciting the surah for the first time, the first person recites the surah again and this process continues till the last person. This process is repeated 10 or x number of times.
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#65 [Permalink] Posted on 20th June 2018 14:17
Prevention of the Qur’an

Someone asked sheikh Muhammad Mukhtar Shinqeeti; “Many days pass without me reading anything from the Quran. Is this considered hajr (boycotting) the Quran?”

He said, 

“This is considered hirman (prevention), and what is prevention? It is when you find that many days pass you and you haven’t recited anything from the Quran. Then cry for yourself! For by Allah! A slave is not prevented from an act of obedience except that it is an indication of his distance from Allah. So when you find the days passing you by and Allah’s Book has no portion of it, or the hours of its nights and days, then cry for yourself and ask Allah for wellbeing (in eman), and throw yourself before Allah sincerely asking forgiveness, because that (condition) is not due to anything except a sin between you and Allah.”

thekatibahwrites.wordpress.com/2017/06/18/prevention-of-t...
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#66 [Permalink] Posted on 23rd June 2018 15:00
Yesterday after Jumah prayer and after finishing my dhikr, I listened to the quran recitation while reading it's translation (the technique which I earlier posted). It was the first 1/3rd portion of 30th juz of Quran and tears starting coming down from my eyes. This was the first time when I cried this much while listening to Quran. This made me realize that if translation of the Quran while listening to it can have this much impact on me then how much more impact the Quran will leave on me if I learn Arabic? This incident increased my love and passion for learning Arabic language more. Thanks to Allah who inspired in my heart this great idea. May Allah keep us all consistent on the straight path.
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#67 [Permalink] Posted on 10th August 2018 22:04
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#68 [Permalink] Posted on 11th August 2018 14:08
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#69 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd November 2018 06:53
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#70 [Permalink] Posted on 7th December 2018 19:20
Heard a nice Jumma bayan today, in which many verses of the Quran were quoted, but not one was translated! At least the speaker could have translated the verse which Umar r.a. read/heard before he accepted Islam.
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#71 [Permalink] Posted on 7th December 2018 19:30
Concerned wrote:
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Was it a theme or something significant this week/month?

We had a short talk on the same topic today but with the verses and translation.
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#72 [Permalink] Posted on 7th December 2018 19:37
This speaker spoke Abu Baker R.a. a few weeks ago, so today he spoke about Umar r.a. if you are going to say so and so verses were revealed due to Umar r.a., then it would be important to translate such verses for listeners.
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#73 [Permalink] Posted on 20th January 2019 10:50
How the Quran Shapes the Brain

"If it wasn't for their political problems and constant fighting between each other, the Muslims would have been on the moon by the 1400's" was the statement made by a non-Muslim professor in a 400-level undergraduate class on the history of science. It seems that the rate of discovery and advancement in science achieved by the Muslims was quite impressive and has yet to be replicated. What was it that they were doing that allowed for their fast progress?

www.islamicity.org/5657/how-the-quran-shapes-the-brain/

A must read article which I read some years ago and suddenly clicked in my mind for sharing here. Must read.

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#74 [Permalink] Posted on 21st January 2019 08:01
https://www.islamicity.org/5657/how-the-quran-shapes-the-brain/

The teacher in me immediately thinks about their education system, and the neuroscientist in me wants to examine the factors involved in shaping the brains of such a civilization. Interestingly, many Muslim religious scholars will say something about how the Muslims were the leaders when the Quran was the center of their education, and only when they abandoned the Quran that they lost their reign. The amazing thing about this is that while Muslim religious scholars are typically talking about spiritual and moral realities, there is actually a material reality to what they're saying, which takes place in the brain.

A quick disclaimer here: The list of all that is affected in the brain by the Quran and how that can influence other functions is quite exhaustive. But in the interest of keeping it short, I chose some major areas to present in this article.

Before getting into the brain and how the Quran changes it, one should be familiar with how traditional Muslim education took place. In case you're wondering where I'm getting this from, it's from reading the biographies of major figures of scholarship in the traditional Muslim world such as Ibn Rushd, Ibn Sina, and others. This is also based on my personal experience and what I have been told by some of my teachers.



The very first thing taught to an aspiring student was the Quran, which had to be memorized completely. Unlike anything else encountered in spoken Arabic, Quran recitation is a very specific science. Local dialects of Arabic or different ways of pronunciation are not permitted when reciting the Quran. In fact, part of learning the Quran is learning what is called in Arabic taj'weed, which means elocution. The very first thing the student must do is replicate exactly how the teacher is reciting the verse. This refers to where individual letter sounds are being generated in the mouth and throat and where the tongue is to be placed exactly. Once this is done, the student writes the verse on a wooden board in the Othamni script, which follows different spelling rules than regular Arabic writing. The student then takes his board and goes away to memorize the verse. A typical memorization session for a beginner starts with repeating one verse multiple times as it is read on the board to also memorize how it is spelled using the Othmani script. The next day the student reviews the verse several times before returning to the teacher to receive the following verse. After repeating it with the teacher to ensure exact replication of sound and pronunciation, the student writes the new verse and goes away to begin a new memorization session. The third day begins with reviewing the first verse one final time, followed by the second verse several times before going to receive the third verse. On the fourth day the first verse is not reviewed anymore as it would have taken hold in memory, and the second verse takes its place for being reviewed while the third verse is repeated several times before going to receive the fourth verse. At the end of the week is a complete review session for everything that was memorized in the previous days.

As the days pass the capacity for memorization increases and the student is able to take on several verses or even pages at a time instead of only one or two verses. The writing using Othmani spelling continues, as well as the review sessions. Eventually, the whole Quran having more than 6,200 verses is memorized word for word with their specific pronunciation and Othmani spelling. Now the hard task begins as the student works to review all the verses on a monthly basis so as to not forget them. This usually means taking the 30 parts of the Quran as it has been divided to facilitate memorization, and reviewing one part everyday until all 30 have been recited by the end of the month.

It should be mentioned here that the Quran has 10 different modes of recitation. This refers to the placement of diacritical marks on the words and how certain words are pronounced. Some students take this task on and memorize the Quran in all the different modes of recitation, which requires a very careful attention to where the pronunciations are different so they're not confused with each other given how subtle they sometimes can be.

There are a couple of important qualities about the Quran that relates to how it sounds. Verses in the Quran rhyme and change rhythm often, which gives a pleasurable effect to the listener. Furthermore, as one recites, they're supposed to sing it rather than simply read it. In fact, the very practice of Taj'weed (elocution) forces the reciter into a singing tone as they enunciate the words of each verse.

A final note to bring up is in regards to the Arabic language and writing in Othmani script. Part of studying the different modes of recitation requires the student to write not only in an unusual spelling, but also to exclude the diacritical marks from the words. This would allow the student to learn the variations of recitation without having the diacritical marks visually interfere with their memorization of different modes of recitation. Moreover, the grammar of the Arabic requires the proper use of diacritical marks in pronunciation so as to not confuse things such as the subject and predicate. This means that the one learning the Quran must always keep track of how the words are enunciated so as to not alter the overall meaning of the verse.



How all of this relates to the brain is quite impressive. The brain is recognized to be a malleable organ that can change its connections and even its size of certain areas based on how active they become. Understanding how involved the brain is of someone learning the Quran using the traditional Muslim method can explain how they were able to achieve such success in their knowledge endeavors.



While learning the Quran, the careful attention to listening and pronunciation of verses stimulates an area of the brain located in the temporal lobe. The temporal lobe is also where the hippocampus is located, which is the memory consolidation center. It's also the brain region activated for processing of musical sounds such as the case when the Quran is recited. Moreover, it becomes involved when the student engages in handwriting exercises similar to the ones on the wooden board. Where this matters is that this is the part of the brain whose activity levels and capacities have been correlated with a person's aptitude for learning new information. The more activation this area receives, and the more involved this activation is such as the case with the Quran, the better and more efficient it becomes in its functions for learning and memory.

The parietal lobes are also quite heavily engaged as one learns the Quran. The left parietal lobe deals with reading, writing, and functions in speech. It's also the part whose activity is important for math and logic problems. The right parietal lobe handles speech tone, which is related to elocution. It's also responsible for visuospatial relationships and understanding facial expressions. The front part is responsible for the sense of touch discrimination and recognition, which is active during handwriting. The back part plays an important role in attention. Both lobes are also activated during skill learning tasks. Overall, having parietal lobes that have been well activated translates to better logic and math-solving skills, eloquence in general speech, better ability at reading emotional states from facial cues, improved attention, and enhanced capacity for understanding visuospatial relationships.

This last one can explain why Muslims were so good at astronomy.
Other brain regions the activity of Quran recitation strongly activate are the frontal lobes and the primary motor cortex. The frontal lobes activity deals with higher order functions, including working memory, memory retrieval, speech production and written-word recognition, sustained attention, planning, social behavior, in addition to others. For example, as the student is reading the Othamni script, his brain must quickly decide on the proper pronunciation of the word, which without the diacritical marks means it must be distinguished from other possibilities that include not only wrong words, but also wrong enunciation depending on the specific recitation he's using out of the 10 valid ones. The amazing thing about this is that the brain after practice will do these things without conscious control from the student. This trains the area of the brain responsible for inhibition, which is important for social interaction. Children with ADHD have been shown to have this area to be under-developed.

Given the Quran's content that for example includes descriptions of individuals and places, it activates the occipital lobes, which are involved in generating mental imagery. This brain region is also important in visual perception. Becoming active as a result of generating mental imagery indirectly improves visual perception capacities since the area activated is within the same region. The Quran is also rich in its content for history, parables, and logical arguments, all of which recruit different areas that become more efficient and better connected as they are continually activated due to the consistent review sessions.

Putting all this together, it's no wonder Muslims were able to make such vast contributions to human knowledge in a relatively short amount of time, historically speaking. After the aspiring student during the height of Muslim rule has mastered the Quran, his education in other sciences began by the time he was in his early teenage years. Given the brain's malleable nature, the improved connections in one region indirectly affect and improve functions in adjacent locations. The process in studying the Quran over the previous years has trained his brain and enhanced its functions relating to visual perception, language, working memory, memory formation, processing of sounds, attention, skill learning, inhibition, as well as planning just to name a few. Now imagine what such an individual will be able to do when they tackle any subject. It makes sense how someone like Imam Al Ghazali can say he studied Greek philosophy on the side during his spare time and mastered it within 2 years.

What was the Muslims' secret for their exponential rise in scientific advancement and contribution to human knowledge? Literally, the Quran when it was the centre of their education system.

Mohamed Ghilan
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#75 [Permalink] Posted on 12th February 2019 17:32
السلام علیکم

I stumbled upon this channel on YouTube and fell in love with it. It has Qur'anic recitations with very easy to understand Urdu translations. May Allah reward this brother abundantly.
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