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#16 [Permalink] Posted on 15th May 2017 12:02
Doktor Akram attacks on the Ashari and Maturidi Schools of Islamic Belief

“For every generation, a new aqeeda book is needed. The aqeeda of our age is evolution, which is taught in every school. The question of the age of Aisha رضي الله عنه when she married the prophet (salAllahu aleyhi wassalam) makes many lay people doubt their Islam. This should be explained and written about, not outdated topics 1000+ years ago that have no relevance to people’s lives anymore. The time of Abul Hasan al-Ash’ari and Abu Mansur al-Maturidi, may Allah have mercy on them both, is over.”

- Shaykh Akram Nadwi

“Abul Hasan al-Ash’ari, may Allah have mercy on him, was defending the salaf in the language of the mu’tazila, just like if we were to debate scientists and had knowledge about science, we would use scientific terminologies. He never intended to make a new aqeeda; he was simply defending the salaf in the most effective way of *his* time. But his arguments were so effective and popular that people codified his arguments and made it into its own aqeeda. The same is the case for Abu Mansur al-Maturidi in Central Asia, may Allah have mercy on him.”
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#17 [Permalink] Posted on 15th May 2017 12:02
Imām Abul Hasan al-Ash'arī and Imām Abu Mansūr al-Māturīdī were two Imāms who tackled the heresies of their time which were in conflict with the pristine teachings of Islam. The principles set forth within the methodologies which were devised by the two Imāms, are those that need to be revived and utilised for the effort against ideologies and philosophies that exist in this society in the contemporary context. Many of these ideologies in particular, are those that take root from modern and post-modern thought, which come to form the foundations of secular-liberal movements that challenge Islam today.

The assertion that the dialectical approaches and teachings of these two classical schools (Ash'arī and Māturīdī), are obsolete and no longer needed, demonstrates a lack of comprehension of:

1. The fundamental and critical teachings of these two schools and
2. A lack of understanding of contemporary ideologies and challenges faced by Muslims today.

The insistence upon the claim that century old discussions that have been addressed and put aside, need not be discussed and taught because they no longer apply to us, is an idea that appears to be in vogue as of late. Rather, one could argue that it is these very age old discussions and arguments that provide us the tools and foresight to address the issues we face today, especially since many of the challenges of today are rebranded manifestations of these old ideas. Only one oblivious to both previous and current challenges would deny this.

Would one claim that the discussions related to the sciences of Hadīth have passed and we are no longer in need of them? Perhaps, we should suggest that the principles and methodologies of the early Hadīth scholars ought to be abandoned too? Or how about the principles of Fiqh that have reached us through the centuries from various Imāms, would anyone suggest that their times are over and so are their teachings? If not, then why is there an issue with the Imāms of Aqīdah?

There are many examples in secular sciences of discussions which no longer have relevance in our society however, they are still taught since the foundational principles used in those discussions, have pragmatic usages that can be reapplied today. One also sees how age old discussions and false notions which were once seen as dead and buried, have re-emerged due to the insistence that they have become common knowledge and so, the frequency of their teachings have been decreased. An example for this is the scepticism surrounding the rotundity of the earth being reignited. There once was a time when the proofs for this were taught in mathematic lessons to a pedantic extent and over time as the fact became common knowledge, these evidences were omitted from classrooms and today those evidences, must be resurrected to address the movement of those who claim for a flat earth.

In order to tackle the criticism of biologists, philosophers and especially cosmologists, we need to reapply the philosophical and methodological approaches of Imām Abul Hasan al-Ash'arī and Imām Abu Mansūr al-Māturīdī when it came to dialectical and philosophical disputation. This cannot be done without revisiting their works, their discussions, debates and principles. What is sad, is that today we have people calling towards the abandonment of such a revival when those who do not share our faith have taken advantage of these methodologies and arguments, examples such as the kalām cosmological argument which the mutakallimīn were pioneers of, are now the tools of others who have reshaped and used them for their own benefits.

It has been claimed that we are in no need of these ways because the laity have no knowledge of them. However, one would argue, since when have the laity been a measure of validity? Many from among the laity have no knowledge of the details of harām and halāl, would that necessitate that we abandon these matters too since they seem to be fine? What better reason to teach than to remedy ignorance? For centuries, the Kalām schools exposed the nakedness of those whose ideas bore no validity, ideas that were misleading and deceptive. It only makes one suspicious as to why today, somebody would object to the return of such an unveiler of falsehoods, unless they themselves feared the same exposure.
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#18 [Permalink] Posted on 15th May 2017 12:09
mkdon101 wrote:
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Bro, how on earth is that an attack on Ashari and Matiridi beliefs?
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#19 [Permalink] Posted on 15th May 2017 12:12
Why are you posting writings from all kinds of people and not mentioning their name or providing a link?
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#20 [Permalink] Posted on 15th May 2017 12:16
Concerned wrote:
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I will post links for future responses which are copied from somewhere.
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#21 [Permalink] Posted on 15th May 2017 14:38
The 'Muqallid Mutlaq' who has nightmares about Taqlīd Shakhsī, and those of his ilk, should stop throwing a fit over the article in defence of Shaykh Zakariyyah [Rahimahullāh] and his Fadhā'il al-A'māl, and stop putting wool over people's eyes by diverting the topic onto the issue of usage of weak Hadīth, etc.
The article categorically states: "It is important to note that the objective here is not to stifle any discussion on the validity of using weak hadīths".
I can assert that the concerns regarding the attacks on Fadhā'il al-A'māl are not merely restricted to the academic perspective, rather the *method* that's chosen to target this book is unreservedly unacceptable. Apart from the recent accusation of Shaykh Zakariyyah having some mental illness when writing the book, others also throw the Kufr and Shirk card into it, Ikrāman. Although the mental illness issue might not be as bad as the Kufr and Shirk one, nonetheless, it's still reprehensible, especially when the quote was unmitigatedly misrepresented.
Have you ever wondered why no other book gets targeted in this *way*?
The irony of this whole thing is that instead of retracting or apologising for such preposterous and irresponsible remarks, a message was sent to the well-wishers and friends not to respond and stay united!
I mean, seriously?! You remember unity now, after causing so much disunity and confusion by making slanderous remarks? You have to remember that this book is not only read or listened to by your well wishers in your courses, but thousands of people, if not millions, all over the world.
It's really amazing how and when this unity card is played. Only if they implemented it before actually causing the Fitna and disunity!

#NoToFakeUnity

- Shaykh Mohammad Yasir al-Hanafi via Facebook which was posted with the article by Mufti Javed Iqbal
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#22 [Permalink] Posted on 16th May 2017 13:05
Question to sh ismail batel by abu Yahya al hanafi in the comments.

I recall that you were making a substantial issue out of the fact that Imran ibn Mansur (Dawahman) released some private conversations from a private forum which involved the Qur’an preservation issue and Yasir Qadhi. I agree that the release of such private discussions being released on an open platform like facebook was a breach of amana (trust) and clearly anti-Islamic in terms of principles.

My question to you now is – Why have you released two screen shots of apparently private discussions from an unknown Whatsapp conversation? Did you get permission from all the individuals in question? By blanking the names out still doesn’t legitimise the actions as the names of two individuals are noticeable in the two screenshots. How can one verify that these screen shots are not photo-shopped fabrications?
Please respond with Shari’i justifications.
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#23 [Permalink] Posted on 16th May 2017 13:12
The itjihaad of the main propagator of the call of doctor akram nadwi. No need for qiyam in ramadan but instead please take out an English translation of the Quran. This is not a direct quote from doctor nadwi but this is the kind of ijtihadi tendencies that he teaches to young people like Salah sharif

If you didn't pray any taraweeh this whole ramadan, no problem.

Whereas if you prayed taraweeh for hours on end every night but you miss a couple fajr and a couple duhr then that is a big problem.

If 11 months of the year you don't pray, why rinse yourself out with hours of taraweeh because it is the social norm, then the day after eid you are not praying again

If you are tired of the same yearly routine of hoping ramadan will change your habits, yet failing every year, then try a new technique. Do this:

Use the month to really really really solidify your five daily prayers. Pray them properly and take the time out to understand what you're reciting. Forget taraweeh. Don't pray it. Use the time that you usually spend standing imagining Netflix shows for 2 hours and instead search the translations of the surahs you often recite, and search the explanation for them. Even the translations of what you say in ruqu and sujood and read some commentaries on them by the likes of Ibn Qayyim, Ibn Kathir, and so on.

If you come out ramadan with a newly developed mentality towards prayer yet you had 0 taraweeh under your belt, then great success.
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#24 [Permalink] Posted on 16th May 2017 14:57
It seems that some people are so happy that they actually found a real slip/mistake from Sh. Akram and they are making use of this opportunity to carry an all out attack on him, and grasping at straws to refute him, even in those cases where there is nothing to refute. There are so adverse to people having a different opinion to them.

Quote:
The itjihaad of the main propagator of the call of doctor akram nadwi. No need for qiyam in ramadan but instead please take out an English translation of the Quran. This is not a direct quote from doctor nadwi but this is the kind of ijtihadi tendencies that he teaches to young people like Salah sharif


Who wrote this? After reading the quote it can be seen that this is a clear misrepresentation of what the Shaykh is saying. Why bring ijtihad into the topic?


Quote:
If you didn't pray any taraweeh this whole ramadan, no problem.

Whereas if you prayed taraweeh for hours on end every night but you miss a couple fajr and a couple duhr then that is a big problem.


What is so hard to understand about this? Fajr and Duhr are fardh, no dispute about this. You purposefully miss one fajr or Duhr anytime of the year it is a big problem. May Allah give me the ability. Ameen. Taraweeh is nor fardh or wajib. You miss taraweeh , then according to the majority there is no sin. Yes only according to the Hanafi school you may be sinning.


Quote:
If 11 months of the year you don't pray, why rinse yourself out with hours of taraweeh because it is the social norm, then the day after eid you are not praying again


So the Shaykh is clearly saying in these statements to get our priorities straight. He is speaking to those who are struggling with there faraidh. Rather than place so much effort in the optional acts, focus on the compulsory acts this month.

And what he is saying is a fact. There are people who don't pray their 5 times salah, or don't make an effort to pray in jamat, but make it compulsory upon themselves to be present for 20 raka taraweeh in the Masjid every night. They feel guilty if they can't pray taraweeh. Some of them wouldn't dare stay away from taraweeh but they will only join the salah in ruku. Some will complain that the Imam is reading too slow. Some will go to where the taraweeh finishes earliest due to speed. Some will sit outside the prayer area and chat until witr. This is all keeping with socially acceptable norms. May Allah save us ,ameen. What's the point in all of this. It would be better to just read what is easy for you in jamat and then go home, or skip taraweeh altogether, or read in a jamat with the last 10 surahs, or read it at home.

And what do we do? We keep speaking about the number of rakats of taraweeh, because we are right and thd salafis are wrong. We make sure the Quran is completed, no matter how fast the imams recite, as we can't make it difficult on the musalles.

In fact, i think according to the Malikis and Shafis, most people wouldn't be allowed to read taraweeh anyway, due to many people missing salah when they were young, and having lots of qada to pray.


Quote:
If you are tired of the same yearly routine of hoping ramadan will change your habits, yet failing every year, then try a new technique. Do this:

Use the month to really really really solidify your five daily prayers. Pray them properly and take the time out to understand what you're reciting. Forget taraweeh. Don't pray it. Use the time that you usually spend standing imagining Netflix shows for 2 hours and instead search the translations of the surahs you often recite, and search the explanation for them. Even the translations of what you say in ruqu and sujood and read some commentaries on them by the likes of Ibn Qayyim, Ibn Kathir, and so on.

If you come out ramadan with a newly developed mentality towards prayer yet you had 0 taraweeh under your belt, then great success.


Insha Allah after following the above advice, one will get the zeal to perform his 5 times salah, one will get the zeal to join the taraweeh the nexrt year.

Also bear in mind the Malikis say one can any amount in jamat, it doesn't have to be 20.
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#25 [Permalink] Posted on 16th May 2017 15:40
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#26 [Permalink] Posted on 16th May 2017 19:36

3 clear Errors of Shaykh (Dr) Akram Nadwi (HA):

  1. Mental Health of Shaykhul-Hadeeth (RA):  Hazrat (RA) was advised to not engage in mentally strenuous activities but he never had any mental health issues. This argument is borrowed from Ghair-Muqallids from India and refuted many times.
  2. Fiqh and Hadeeth (formal) Education of Haji Imdadullah Muhajir Makki (RA): Haji Saheb (RA) studied Fiqh and Hadeeth (both), not to Dars-e-Nizami level but he did!
  3. Being an Alim a requirement for Khilafah in Chishti SilSila: No such reuirement in the Silsila whatsoever

There is no reason to defend Shaykh (Dr) Akram Nadwi (HA) and knowing him he won’t stick to his errors when officially informed that he made mistakes in these matters.

These are his mistakes, no doubt.

 

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#27 [Permalink] Posted on 16th May 2017 22:21
Agreed
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#28 [Permalink] Posted on 17th May 2017 15:42
Akram Nadwi supports women only mosque.

Muslim Women Council are behind this proposed mosque who have been inspired by
Sherin Khankan, Denmark's first female imam who has led the foundation of a women-only mosque in Copenhagen called Mariam Mosque. The mosque marries couples of different religions.
The mosque has drawn up its own six-page marriage charter with four key principles: polygamy is not an option; women have the right to divorce; a marriage will be annulled if psychological or physical violence is committed; and, in the event of divorce, women will have equal rights over any children.

Women's Mosque and Centre for Excellence
(Bradford, UK)

Mohammad Akram Nadwi
Oxford

During a recent teaching visit to Bradford I came to know about the project to set up, in this city, a women’s mosque and centre for excellence (ihsan). I was able to meet some of the women leading this project and they explained to me their need for it and their hopes for it.

In some of my published writing I have shown in detail, and with abundant evidence, that in the best times for this Community – when the example of generations nearest to the period of the revelation of the Qur’an informed the ideals and norms of society – women had a strong presence in the mosques. They were present both to attend the regular prayer services and, also, to teach and study the religion. The emphasis of my work was the muhaddithat, the women experts in the hadith and the sunnahs of the Prophet, upon him be peace. I have shown, through the documents still available – such as class registers, ijazahs, and the like – that the authority of women to teach in the great madrasas and mosques of the great cities of Islam, including the Prophet’s own mosque in Madinah, was easily and widely accepted. The women were devout, dedicated teachers, both of other women and of men. Many of the most well-known, mainstream scholars, such as the famous Qur’an commentator Ibn Kathir, had studied the religion with women teachers and held them in the highest esteem, and they expressed their appreciation and gratitude in writing. All of this is in the historical record and that record is available to us.

Sadly, from the tenth–eleventh Islamic century onwards to our day, the presence of women in the mosques and teaching institutions of the religion, has been in sharp decline. The norms and ideals have changed to the extent that we are now told that it is better for women to pray at home, not in the mosques. We are told that it is permissible for them to pray in the mosques, but it is not commended, rather it is discouraged. Some go even further and say that is not permissible (let alone commended) for women to come to the mosques, either for the prayers, or for religious instruction. That is the reverse of the sunnah of the first Muslims.

When Muslims abandon a sunnah of their Prophet, upon him be peace, another custom, not authorised in the religion, is adopted in its place. Then, the love for the Prophet, and the desire to obey his instruction and follow his example, begins to weaken. Allah promised to protect His Messenger from error – that is a part of His protection of the Book that He revealed to him – and His promise is true. When the Muslims abandon the sunnahs of His Messenger, they step out of the circle of safety which protects them from error and the consequences of error. This is so whether one individual abandons a sunnah or if a whole community does so. But in the latter case, the consequences are far more grave, more far-reaching, and more long-lasting.

The believers’ highest dignity, and their first responsibility after belief itself, is worship. It is hard to imagine a greater indignity for any believer than to be turned away from a mosque. It is utterly impossible that the Prophet, upon him peace, would ever teach his Companions to turn anyone away from a mosque because they were poor and not rich, or a slave and not a free person, or black and not white, or non-Arab and not Arab, or a woman and not a man. Nevertheless, this dreadful indignity is, in our time and in some of our communities, imposed on women, and this act of disrespect expands into other injustices in the attitudes to women, and the treatment of them, that are all too familiar. Such injustices are part of the consequences our communities must bear when we abandon the protection and safety of the sunnahs.

The need for women to go to the mosques for the daily prayers, to take part in study circles, to encourage and be encouraged by other Muslims to live their religion seriously – is neither more nor less than the same need in men. This need must be met; it is a religious duty. The lack of provision, and the lack of welcome, for women in the mosques that we have, is the main reason for this project – to have a space for women, where they can worship together, where they can encourage one another to study the religion and improve their understanding and practice of it. It is an initiative that deserves to be supported financially and morally by both men and women. I admire and appreciate the intention, and the will and determination, of those leading this project. In sha’a Allah it will be a success.

As I said above, the Prophet, upon him be peace, did not teach us to shut the doors of the mosque to anyone. Just because some mosques in our time and place shut their doors to women does not justify this women’s mosque from shutting its doors to men. Rather, any space called a mosque must strive to be a place of assembly, of unity, for the Muslims of a neighbourhood. Thus, I hope that, at the times of the prayers, the doors of this mosque will not be shut to men. That is an important principle. The rest of the time, it can be a space reserved for the women of the neighbourhood, where they gather for social, devotional and educational purposes, organise study circles, hold public meetings and lectures, and discuss policies and actions to help the wider community.

I hope this mosque can be a space where women help one another to come nearer to their Lord in their worship and in all their activities within and outside that space. I hope that men as well as women give this mosque the welcome and support that it deserves. And I pray to Allah to accept it and make it a means for the improvement of the iman and din, the faith and religion, of all who use it.
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#29 [Permalink] Posted on 17th May 2017 17:32
I don't know anything about this besides what you posted.

Quote:
Akram Nadwi supports women only mosque.


Aftet reading the article it can be seem that this title his is misleading.

Quote:
Muslim Women Council are behind this proposed mosque who have been inspired by
Sherin Khankan, Denmark's first female imam who has led the foundation of a women-only mosque in Copenhagen called Mariam Mosque. The mosque marries couples of different religions.
The mosque has drawn up its own six-page marriage charter with four key principles: polygamy is not an option; women have the right to divorce; a marriage will be annulled if psychological or physical violence is committed; and, in the event of divorce, women will have equal rights over any children.


Did the organisers of the mosque Sh Akram is referring to also adopt this marriage charter? Did Sh Akram comment on these issues?



Quote:
....Some go even further and say that is not permissible (let alone commended) for women to come to the mosques, either for the prayers, or for religious instruction. That is the reverse of the sunnah of the first Muslims.

When Muslims abandon a sunnah of their Prophet, upon him be peace, another custom, not authorised in the religion, is adopted in its place....

The lack of provision, and the lack of welcome, for women in the mosques that we have, is the main reason for this project – to have a space for women, where they can worship together, where they can encourage one another to study the religion and improve their understanding and practice of it


Here Sh Akram explains why there would be a need for such a space for women.

Quote:
Just because some mosques in our time and place shut their doors to women does not justify this women’s mosque from shutting its doors to men. Rather, any space called a mosque must strive to be a place of assembly, of unity, for the Muslims of a neighbourhood. Thus, I hope that, at the times of the prayers, the doors of this mosque will not be shut to men. That is an important principle


Here is why the title is not entirely true, ad the Shaikh is condemning a full women's only mosque which bans men from praying in it.

A lot of people would disagree with the point made below.

Quote:
Sadly, from the tenth–eleventh Islamic century onwards to our day, the presence of women in the mosques and teaching institutions of the religion, has been in sharp decline. The norms and ideals have changed to the extent that we are now told that it is better for women to pray at home, not in the mosques. We are told that it is permissible for them to pray in the mosques, but it is not commended, rather it is discouraged.


Sh Akram also put forward this view in his publication from Ibn Hazm, who also holds this view, based on the strength of the narrations regarding the issue. I notice a lot of scholars in North America also hold this view. What I would like to know is whether this view is found within the four madhabs. Which early ulama held this view? Or is is a view to be rejected?
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#30 [Permalink] Posted on 18th May 2017 12:24

Concerned wrote:
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In our class Shaykh (Dr) Akram Nadwi (HA) discussed this matter and put his point of view forward to the students. I understand where he is coming from but don’t necessarily agree with him. These are Academic discussions in a class setting and not for public forums but suffice to say that the opinion of Shaykh (Dr) Akram Nadwi (HA) is in contradiction to Jamhoor on this topic.

There are many who are using Shaykh Akram Nadwi (HA) and his opinions as a tool to achieve their objectives of liberty and freedom.

Having said that, some of the Deobandees in UK are far too strict on the matter of women attending Mosques as has already been discussed...let them come out in their droves and start another round of refutations of this topic.

And

1

2

3

...

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