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#76 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd August 2017 17:43
Maripat wrote:
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I respect your concerns Maripat. May be I am wrong. So far I have not found even one person who is affected by his views...

As far as his TV and utube videos,there is one person more in demand,present daily on talk shows on multiple TV channels and people like to listen to him because of his peculiar style and political views. His name is Shaikh Rashid. Both of them are listened to and every word of them is forgotten once the TV is switched off :)

Hasan Nisar takes advantage of the lacunae in our history. It is our own fault the we take the history of 'Muslim kings' as Islamic history. We try to defend some indefensible acts of certain kings who happened to be Muslim. We also defend Persian,Turkish and Mughal civilisation as 'Islamic civilisation'.He acts like an angry young man when he points out how far behind we are left in science and technology...and so on ! These valid points make people listen to him but nobody takes him as a religious scholar.

As I said,I might be absolutely wrong in assessing his potential damage but as of today I don't consider him a serious threat to faith. والله اعلم

You are indeed in a much better position where the question of risk stratification arise. So I will be more cautious about him from now onwards. InshaAllah
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#77 [Permalink] Posted on 23rd August 2017 04:48
ALIF wrote:
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Very graceful.

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#78 [Permalink] Posted on 23rd August 2017 06:48
Battered, But Still Afloat


By Anatol Lieven | Special Report | Published 1 day ago

"Anatol Lieven is a professor at Georgetown University in Qatar and a senior fellow of the new America Foundation in Washington DC. He is author, among other books, of Pakistan: A Hard Country.

I have always been struck by the contrast between the dramatic and often violent character of Pakistan’s public life and the relative resilience and stability of Pakistani society. This resilience is the central reason why crises that would have sunk other states have left Pakistan battered, but still afloat. It is striking that several Arab states that once looked much richer and stronger than Pakistan have collapsed completely, whereas Pakistan, in its own messy and infuriating way, continues to trundle along. And if Pakistan could survive the combination of US pressure and Islamist insurgency of the past decade, and defeat that insurgency, then there are good grounds to be confident that Pakistan will go on surviving for quite a long time to come.

When writing my book about Pakistan, I used the word “Janus-faced” so many times that the editor at Penguin made 17 deletions. Again and again, I had to point to the ways in which the good and bad aspects of Pakistan were two sides of the same coin – and in particular, how the sources of resilience in Pakistan have also been sources of stagnation or oppression, and vice versa.

This is quintessentially true of the fundamental unit of Pakistani society – the extended family. This institution has, in general, either been completely ignored by economists, or fluffy teddy bear without eyesed as a source of “amoral familism” and the plundering of the state. Progressive sociologists and journalists have tended to fluffy teddy bear without eyes the family as a source of social conservatism and oppression, especially of women. And all of this is quite true, as a glance at the Pakistani press on almost any day will show you. What these pictures fail to capture, however, is the critical role of family solidarity in preventing large masses of Pakistanis from sinking into complete immiseration, and Pakistani society from becoming even more harsh and ruthless.

This is a lesson that the modern West might do well to study. Report after report on the working classes (or rather former working classes) in the USA and Europe have established a close relationship between the breakdown of traditional family structures and general patterns of social, economic and moral decline. One might dream that some day in the future, Pakistan and the West might develop cultures that manage to combine loyalty to the family with respect for the laws of the state. To be honest though, as of today that day seems a long way off.

The Pakistani institution that has managed to insulate itself most successfully against “amoral familism” is the army – though in part, as I pointed out in my book, by turning itself into a giant biradiri and extracting resources from the state for the benefit of its members. Nonetheless, the centrality of the army to Pakistan’s existence and future has been demonstrated both by its victory over the Pakistani Taliban and by China’s commitment to CPEC and its associated projects, which was made possible by the defeat of the Pakistani Taliban, and will depend heavily on the military for both security and logistics.

Discussion on the role of the military in Pakistan has been befuddled by two competing dreams, neither of them rooted in the country’s reality. On the side of the military (and from time to time very large numbers of ordinary Pakistanis), there is the belief that because the military runs itself with considerable honesty and efficiency, it can do the same for the entire Pakistani state. This might make sense if the Pakistani population were five times smaller and the Pakistani Army were five times larger, and if the army were a truly national force rather than overwhelmingly a product of northern Punjab and the Pashtun areas. As it is, whenever the military takes over the state it finds itself ingested by Pakistani political society and governing through intermediaries, who are no better than the ones the military displaced.

On the other side is the equally absurd hope of Pakistani politicians (in the intervals of seeking military support against their political rivals) and liberal intellectuals that the Pakistan Army should behave like that of a ‘normal’ country (Denmark? New Zealand?), ‘return to the barracks,’ and abandon any role in the political life and government of the country – in the intervals, of course, not only of fighting counter-insurgency but of maintaining basic ethnic peace in Pakistan’s largest city, and being called on, at regular intervals, to perform every civilian task from disaster relief to building roads and running basic public services.

Given the lack of a credible national opposition, it looks as if the PML-N will be in power for the foreseeable future. The military has demonstrated both its centrality to the state and its lack of desire for a coup. Maybe a stable modus vivendi between the military and civilian government can be established – if only because this is very much what the Chinese strongly desire. But it’s more likely that we will see an endless struggle of low-level skirmishes between the two. Compared to the past, however, this would still be stability of a kind. It would also allow Lahore and Islamabad dinner parties to go on talking about the prospect of another military coup and the particular character of the latest army chief, topics without which – once social gossip is exhausted – they might be reduced to complete silence.

A more balanced debate on Pakistan by the Pakistani intelligentsia may be enabled by developments in India, which under Modi is coming to resemble some of the worst aspects of Pakistan. For Pakistani blasphemy lynchings, read Indian state-sanctioned lynchings in defence of cows. For India to develop in this manner is not a good thing for the world or India itself. Together with Trump’s election in the US, however, it may encourage a debate among Pakistani intellectuals, which is motivated by an interest in Pakistani problems and what to do about them, rather than an endless cringing before idealised, indeed etherealised models of Western and Indian democracy.

Among Pakistani’s critical problems, there is a short-term threat which is also likely to be a permanent one: how to manage the deep hostility of sections of Pakistani society to India and the US, while helping prevent the kind of terrorist attacks on these countries that could provoke catastrophic responses. So far, Pakistani intelligence has done a good job of cooperating with Western intelligence services to prevent such attacks.

Long may this cooperation continue. For, in my view, the only way that the forces of revolution and chaos could be unleashed in Pakistan is in the context of a US response to a terrorist attack that would create intolerable tensions and dilemmas for the Pakistani state and Pakistani soldiers. A lesser but still important challenge is to avoid being drawn by Saudi Arabia into the sectarian conflicts of the Middle East. Although the USA (largely due to Israeli influence) has lined up with Saudi Arabia against Iran, for Pakistan to do so would be utterly against Pakistani interests – and Chinese aid now gives Pakistan much more room for manoeuvre in this regard.

In the longer term, the most important problem facing Pakistan is extreme shortage of water, which is exacerbated by population growth, climate change and appallingly poor water management. The lethal effects of this combination can already be seen in the declining yields of Punjab’s agriculture. How one assesses Pakistan’s ability to meet this challenge depends largely on how far one believes that Pakistani agriculture can respond spontaneously and dynamically in the absence of effective state action.

On this I am an agnostic. On the one hand, no one can spend any length of time in Pakistan without being struck by the contrast between the Brontosaurean lumberings of the Pakistani state and the nimbleness of parts (though only parts) of Pakistan’s private economy; after all, half a century ago, parts of Pakistani agriculture responded rather brilliantly to the Green Revolution. On the other hand, the general lesson for the rest of the world seems to be that effective action in this field (as in moves to alternative energy) depends on effective cooperation between the state and private business. One thing, however, seems certain. Pakistan has enough resilience to survive and (modestly) prosper in the short to medium term. However, unless it can find answers to this critical issue, no one can guarantee its survival in the long term."

Source : NewsLineMagazine
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#79 [Permalink] Posted on 24th August 2017 12:24
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#80 [Permalink] Posted on 24th August 2017 15:04
pakistan days are numbered. seems like US is hell bent on attacking. few days ago newsnight had two usa pundits on both desperate for trump to attack pak instead of afghanistan accusing it of being breeder of terrorism and harbouring them. will be interesting to see what happends. i cant see china allowing pak to be occupied by americans.
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#81 [Permalink] Posted on 24th August 2017 19:54
mkdon101 wrote:
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Strange comments :

If it was that easy for America they would have done it long ago !

Moreover attacking and defeating a country is one thing and holding it is another. The American military might miserably failed in Afghanistan and Iraq to hold their grip on the country,how can they hold a country of almost 200 million ? It is well known fact that America can not sustain dead bodies and coffins coming home...and they will receive a lot of them for sure if they have a ground assault on Pakistan. Even 'might' have limits sir. !

They can pressurise Pakistan economically,for sure,that is the weakest spot of Pakistan; they can diplomatically isolate Pakistan,yes..but any military campaign inside Pakistan will trap them in the longest military adventure of their history and destabilise the whole region.Therefore,I disagree with your suggestion that china is ready to handover Pakistan to America. It will prove too costly for china..and even for India. So for Pakistan is a defective buffer state between India and Jehadis. If there is no Pakistan there will be open access of jehadis to India who may find many 'troubled souled' ready to be recruited. The consequences will be disastrous both for Indian society and a growing Indian economy.

About trump,s new policy blaming Pakistan for their disastrous defeat in Afghanistan ,I wiould like to add a few words here:

As is always said :"might is right", therefore America is right and Pakistan is wrong,otherwise both are equal partners in this crime (second only to former USSR,who started this bloody game to begin with).

Zia needed legitimacy and America wanted to trap the bear in Afghanistan.Everyone was happy as Pukhtun/afghan blood was shed,their homes destroyed,their families displaced and their homeland burned in fire. The CIA called it jehad and Reagan invited 'mujahideen' to White House.Then they were fighting for the 'free world' against the 'infidelity of communists'. Saudi money poured in and jehadis from all over the world were flown in to participate. The soviets were defeated and Pakistan was left hanging up in the air,high and dry,to deal with the consequences. All the foreign aid stoped and heavy sanctions were put in place against Pakistan for their nuclear programme. Afghanistan itself was left to its destiny without any serious effort by the west to bring about a political solution to the problem. Hence the civil war continued and made inroads even into Pskistan.

It should have been a good lesson in real time international politics for Pakistan,but they shiuld blame only themselves for trusting America once again.They went into this war with their eyes open. The lust for dollars and legitimacy for dictators proved more powerful than the blood of Pukhtuns and even the interests of Pakistan.

Pakistan kept reaping the consequences till another coup coupled with another more serious event 9/11. The dictator again needed legitimacy and dollars otherwise the threat by Bush was not more severe than the recent threat by Trump.

Thr dictator succumbed to American pressure and helped American against the then Taliban government of Afghanistan. Pakistan payed a heavy priced for it by losing almost 70,000 civilian and hundreds of military lives plus a dollar 120 billion in economic cost. The things gradually improved after successful ZARB E AZB operation.

Trump,s policy is flawed to the core. Pakistan can neither win this war for America nor is it in a position to bring Taliban to negotiation table. Many other international players are now active in Afghanistan,including Russia supplying weapons and funds to Taliban..as well as Iran. The influence of Pakistan over Taliban have reduced considerably. The new reality DAESH OF KHURASAN is not (never was) under the influence of Pakistan.

To be honest,short of direct military intervention,supporting India against Pskistan and supporting terrorist activities inside Pakistan... there is little America can do against Pakistan. Military might destroy not only Pakistan but put the whole region in flames,so nobody will allow it PLUS it will prove very costly to America and its allies both in human cost as well as dollars. On the other hand,if Pakistan decides to give America a bloody nose in Afghanistan,that would be relatively easy but will have a high price too. As for economic aid,America gave Pakistan only 70 million dollars in aid last year...an obviously insignificant amount.

It is high time for Pakistan to get rid of American influence and develop an independent foreign policy;If Cuba,Iran and North Korea can survive the wrath of America,so can Pakistan !



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#82 [Permalink] Posted on 24th August 2017 20:42
Sorry for spelling mistakes.I don't know how did I make so many of them ? :)
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#83 [Permalink] Posted on 25th August 2017 05:45
ALIF wrote:
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Do not worry. These can be fixed by editting. You wrote a wonderful post. Please continue writing on this and similar issues.

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#84 [Permalink] Posted on 25th August 2017 10:25
Maripat wrote:
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JazakAllah Maripat for your kindness :)

My Shaikh told me once never talk,write or act while in anger. I ignored the advise and hence...

But Maripat,despite being ashamed of myself for anger,for which I had no right,as everybody here is a better Muslim and a better human being than my own miserable self...I still feel the comment was a bit insensitive.I am sure the brother did not mean anything negative but effectively it looked like he missed one word in the beginning. "Congratulations,looks like Pakistan,s days are numbered"...

...and why the days are numbered ? Because that old demented president of United States of America says so...as if Nauoozobillah Trump is our ILAH and RABB having the authority to decide the number of our days. :(

...and then,don't we know the days of every living soul and every nation are numbered which can neither be postponed nor brought forward,and that the destined time for every soul and every nation is known only to Allah swt ?

Further,even if the days of Pakistan are numbered,is it a cause for 'celebration'... OR 'deliberation' on how to try and save a brotherly Muslim state (even if we don't like or respect it). The Muslims are supposed to be like one body...

Anyway,let us move forward :)
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#85 [Permalink] Posted on 25th August 2017 11:32
Maripat wrote:
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Maripat,to me,Pakistan lost the 'legal' right to exist the day it became allied to the west against the innocent afghans,allowing the enemies their airspace,air fields and land routs to bomb the Muslim brothers across the border. The government got scared of American wrath and the public gave their silent consent by not protesting against such a decision;The day when the ambassador of Afghanistan Mulla Abdul Salam Zaeef was handed over to Americans ;the day Pakistani government took Muslim blood and the honour of a Muslim guest cheaper than dollars;when they got so scared of the worldly super power that they disobeyed the clear instructions of Allah
swt...
Please read from Surah alameda verse 51-
52

"O you who have believed, do not take the Jews and the Christians as allies. They are [in fact] allies of one another. And whoever is an ally to them among you - then indeed, he is [one] of them. Indeed, Allah guides not the wrongdoing people.
So you see those in whose hearts is disease hastening into [association with] them, saying, "We are afraid a misfortune may strike us." But perhaps Allah will bring conquest or a decision from Him, and they will become, over what they have been concealing within themselves, regretful."

What is left is ROYAL PARDON from Allah swt,otherwise legally they have signed their death warrant. Allah karim !

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#86 [Permalink] Posted on 26th August 2017 04:37
Good sentiments ya akhi and very good comments. Also we can not give up either on Pakistan or Ummah.
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#87 [Permalink] Posted on 27th August 2017 13:27

ALIF wrote:
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Pakistan and Pakistanees did not.

A certain (dictator) General changed the direction of foreign policy. These matters are written in books of Islam when a dictator and an oppressor takes over the reigns of the Ummah and inflicts decisions upon the Ummah which are detested and resisted but people have no choice but to endure.

Then there are “Chamchay” who always go along with these dictators to enable his commands for the sake of profit, fame or spoils of this world.

This Ummah has suffered many catastrophic turns, tribulations and trials in this manner. Our history is replete with dictators and idiots who inflicted decisions upon us.

Allah Ta’ala knows the conditions of the hearts.

This will keep happening until the Saudi Government will even order the Saudi National Guard to march upon the Ka’bah (to fight the army of Mahdi (AS) and they will obey the orders and try to crush Mahdi (AS).

وعن أم المؤمنين أم عبد الله عائشة رضي الله عنها قالت‏:‏ قال رسول الله صلى الله عليه وسلم ‏:‏ ‏"‏يغزو جيش الكعبة فإذا كانوا ببيداء من الأرض يخسف بأولهم وآخرهم‏"‏‏.‏ قالت‏:‏ قلت‏:‏ يارسول الله، كيف يخسف بأولهم وآخرهم وفيهم أسواقهم ومن ليس منهم‏!‏‏؟‏ قال‏:‏ ‏"‏يخسف بأولهم وآخرهم، ثم يبعثون على نياتهم‏"‏ ‏(‏‏(‏متفق عليه‏.‏ هذا لفظ البخاري‏)‏‏)‏‏.‏
 

Narrated 'A'ishah (RA) reported: Messenger of Allah (ﷺ) said, "An army will raid the Ka'bah and when it reaches a desert land, all of them will be swallowed up by the earth." She asked; "O Messenger of Allah! Why all of them?" He answered, "All of them will be swallowed by the earth but they will be raised for Judgement according to their intentions." [Bukhari]

My point is that my Allah Ta’ala is merciful and he doesn’t punish the nations on the decisions of dictators, tyrants and oppressors, although the Ummah does need to make Tawbah (due to their sins and transgression).

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#88 [Permalink] Posted on 31st August 2017 02:45
"This will keep happening until the Saudi Government will even order the Saudi National Guard to march upon the Ka’bah (to fight the army of Mahdi (AS) and they will obey the orders and try to crush Mahdi (AS)."

Chilling prophecy, Colonel Sahab, Allahummahfizna.
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#89 [Permalink] Posted on 31st August 2017 19:48
abuzayd2k wrote:
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That will be 'some army' NOT necessarily Saudi national guard,sent by someone called 'Sufyani'. Who is sufyani,we don't know. It could be someone from the ruling establishment of Saudi,s,or someone from another country like Syria (more likely). Again we don't know if the present Saudi Royal family will be ruling the country at that time.

We don't know the timeframe for that particular event,it could be around the corner or some thousand or more years from now. The ahadeeth about 'end times' don't give any specific time frame. Probably needs a 'board of ulama' to think over it !
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#90 [Permalink] Posted on 2nd September 2017 11:12

ALIF wrote:
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I also remember reading the analysis of an Alim  that this applies to Saudi Army but you are right that it was his analysis. I am not sure if a 'board of ulama' will think about this and respond in writing.

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