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#61 [Permalink] Posted on 3rd February 2016 04:13
Rajnath Meets Muslim Representatives


DNA

Indian Express

Times of India

Indian Home Minister, Rajnath Singh met Muslim representatives to talk about terrorism threats to India. Above three sources give complementary information.

My feeling is that it is a personal initiative on part of Mr Singh who belongs to the other branch of the rightwing politics of India, the branch that was subverted by the present Prime Minister Mr Narendra Modi.

Of course the very fact that this kind of meeting took place, with National security Advisor Ajit Doval present, is a sign that the current dispensation does not have ideas of their own on this crucial issue.

The DNA report says:

Quote:

After continuous efforts to muster support of Muslim leaders who matter, Union home minister Rajnath Singh finally succeeded in meeting Jamiat Ulema-e-Hind (JUM) that carries a lot of weight among Indian Muslims.

BJP government's efforts to reach out to the Muslim community to give push to its counter-radicalisation agenda against ISIS seems to have paid some dividends at last albeit with conditions.

After continuous efforts to muster support of Muslim leaders who matter, Union home minister Rajnath Singh finally succeeded in meeting Jamiat Ulema-e-Hind (JUM) that carries a lot of weight among Indian Muslims.

The rest of the dozen-odd maulanas, who met Rajnath Singh to discuss ways to counter the ongoing radicalisation of youths on Tuesday, were either custodians of Sufi Dargahs whose following is already on the wane, leaders of Shia sect that is in minority in India and not considered a terror threat or RSS-backed Muslim organisations who do not count at all. The delegation even included chief imam of Parliament Masjid.

The JUM, while conveying that Muslim organisations are already doing their best to keep youth away from any sort of radicalisation, asked the home minister to arrest efforts to marginalise the Muslim community by way of 'terrorising it'.

"The meeting was necessary to convey our concerns that we squarely conveyed. We asked the home minister why no action has been taken against the Hindu Swabhiman Sena that is giving arms training to 15,000 children.

Can we imagine any minority community or Muslims doing the same and not earn the wrath of law enforcement agencies?" said Kamal Faruqui, a well-known liberal Muslim scholar, who was also part of the delegation.

Faruqui said the home minister promised them that he has taken a note of it and some action would follow.

Encouraged by the first-time participation of Jamiat Ulema-e-Hind (JUeM), Rajnath Singh was keen to help the in establishing a mechanism of talks with other Muslim organisations of repute.

The JUeM's representative Mia Niaz Farooqui understood to told the minister that Muslim organisations would want to meet the government and extend their full support but for that onus lies on the government to make conducive atmosphere by reining in rabid right-wing forces from spreading anti-Muslim canard.

But it seems that the BJP government will have have to put in a lot of effort in connecting with the Muslim world as the press release issued by the Union home ministry was riddled with mistakes in spelling of names of organisations and individuals who attended the three hour long marathon meeting.

For its part the ministry said the delegation condemned all kind of violence in the name of religion and explained that Islam stands for peace and well-being of all; and no one should be misguided or carry an understanding contrary to this fact. They also added that they were against any sort of terrorist or violence activities including cross-border terrorism.


The Indian express report has more to add:
Quote:

Amid a nationwide crackdown on Islamic State (IS) recruitment, a delegation of Muslim clerics and leaders met Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh on Tuesday and discussed “issues concerning the community”. Source said the home minister sought the delegation’s support to prevent Muslim youth from being lured by oufits like the IS.

According to sources, Singh admitted a “lack of confidence” in the government among some religious groups.

“The minister started off by saying that he wanted a free and open dialogue to resolve these pending issues and to clarify some of the misperceptions that are created by controversial remarks that give a negative impression about BJP-RSS,” said a source.

Community leaders raised a range of issues, including the minority status of Aligarh Muslim University and Jamia Millia Islamia, the Communal Violence Bill and the 123 Wakf properties in Delhi that are in possession of various government agencies.

“The problem is that behind closed doors, the minister talks about lack of confidence, but the government, instead of taking punitive action against communal loudmouths, actually rewards them,” said a cleric present at the meeting.

NSA Ajit Doval and IB chief Dineshwar Sharma also attended the meeting.

According to sources, the home minister sought the support of the delegation in counter radicalisation measures to prevent Muslim youth from falling prey to outfits like the IS. At the same time, he stressed that India’s traditions and family values would thwart any radicalisation attempts.


But the Times of India report is the most detailed one:

Quote:
NEW DELHI: The government, keen to co-opt the Muslim clergy and community heads in its efforts to counter radicalization by the Islamic State, on Tuesday reached out to a section of Muslim leaders with home minister Rajnath Singh apprising them of the threat from ISIS and requesting them to issue appeals to vulnerable youth not be misled by violent extremism propagated by the global terror outfit.

Some key leaders of the Muslim delegation that met Singh here are prominent Shia cleric Maulana Kalbe Jawwad; Ajmer Sharief dargah chief Maulana Abdul Wahid Hussain Chisti, Jamiat Ulema Hind general secretary Niaz Faruqui, Dargah Dewa Sharief head Maulana Wamiq Rafiq Warsi Sahab, Haryana Imams Organisation's Maulana Mohammad Alim Nadvi and Muslim Economic Forum national convener Dr MJ Khan. The delegation also comprised member of All India Muslim Personal Law Board and former Samajwadi Party leader Kamal Faruqui and journalist Kamar Agha.

"The initiative was to give the community leaders a forum to raise their grievances and issues of concern, while alerting them to the problem of growing radicalisation of Indian youth by ISIS. The home minister requested the top Muslim leaders from north India to use their traction with young members with the community to issue appeals asking them not to be misled by ISIS online propaganda and get drawn to violent extremism," a home ministry officer told TOI.

The Muslim leaders offered their cooperation in counter-radicalisation efforts of the government and security agencies. Condemning all kinds of violence in the name of religion, the delegation explained that Islam stands for peace and well-being of all and no one should be misguided or have an understanding contrary to this fact. The community leaders said they were against any sort of terrorist or violent activities including cross-border terrorism.

A home ministry release claimed the leaders, while underlining that Muslims were safe and enjoyed freedom in India, said such freedom and security is not available to the community even in Muslim-majority countries.



The community leaders used the meeting, which was attended by national security adviser Ajit Doval and the intelligence and home ministry brass, to raise the issue of educational and economic backwardness among Muslims and requested the government to take positive steps for upliftment of the community.


On his part, the home minister assured them that their grievances would be heard and regular meetings taken with community leaders from across the country to offer them a forum to raise issues of concern and discuss ways to resolve them.



Singh has always maintained that the threat of radicalisation among Indian youth is tackled to a large extent with the cooperation of their families, who have in the past come forward to alert the Indian agencies to instances of their loved ones showing signs of radicalisation.


Allaying fears of some Muslim leaders regarding possible persecution of young members of the community in the name of countering radicalization, Singh assured them that utmost care was being taken by the intelligence and investigative agencies in tracking the vulnerable youth, with detentions and arrests being made only where there were concrete leads on the suspects being in touch with active ISIS head-hunters, planning to travel to ISIS territory or gathering resources for possible attacks in India.


According to the home ministry release, the delegation emphasized that Indian Muslim youths have not fallen prey to any propaganda in the name of Islam and expressed satisfaction on steps taken by the NDA government for creating an atmosphere of peace and security in the mind of the minority community.
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#62 [Permalink] Posted on 3rd February 2016 11:36
Maripat wrote:
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Kindly give us a summary of Rajnath Singh vs Modi dynamics.

Jzk
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#63 [Permalink] Posted on 5th February 2016 04:58
Muadh_Khan wrote:
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Since nothing has come into public about the Narendra Modi - Rajnath Singh dynamics it is not possible at the moment to such much on the issue. That there is some dynamics can, of course, be ascertained from the circumstances. That BJP is a political wing of the vile RSS is no secret and in its earlier stint at the centre it rode to power by demolishing the Babri Masjid. That was the first round of NDA, National Democratic Alliance, lead by BJP.

Once they were in power their came more into public view. Apart from blatant anti-Muslim stance they had shamelessly recruited people from criminal class, films and for the first time India came to know that there even was an intellectual class too that was ideologically defending them. Few other aspects became clear to the public. The corruption levels in BJP were no less than in Congress. In fact these were more. Congress always had Gandhian pretentions where austerity is a way of life. Except for the old guard BJP had none of that. People like Pramod Mahajan flounted a gaunty life style involving around five star hotels. All the second rank cadre of BJP flocked around him for he controlled the treasury of the party.

Among the top rank AB Vajpayee, though an on your sleeve communal politician, maitained some sort of acceptability, perhaps because of praises for him by Jawaharlal Nehru in earlier years. His public remark to Modi to do the stately duty in times of 2002 Muslim pogrom in Gujrat brought the cat out of the bag. Communal standards of Modi, his Muslim hatred, were much higher than Vajpayee.

Jaswant Singh had to handle the Air India flight IC814 hijacking to Kandhar and this was a dirty job that obviously put a dent into his image, in spite of no fault of his own.

Most curious episode was of LK Advani, the architect of BJP rise in India because od his Rath Yatra, Chariot Journey. He whipped up a Tsunami like communal frenzy against Muslims of India that polarised enough of Hindus such that BJP rode to power as a leader of the NDA and formed central government under Vajpayee.

Like Vajpayee's pseudo acceptability facade Advani too had a facade of statesman. This somehow slipped to ridiculous level. His secretary Sudhindra Kulkarni helped him in that. Years later Kulkarni's face was blackened with ink for his Crime. What was this event that lead to undoing of Advani? Well Advani asserted that MA Jinnah, who lead the political movement for the formation and creation of Pakistan, was a secular man.

Jinnah certainly was a secular man but entrenched interests of the majority community lie in slapping a communal, bigoted, character on Jinnah. That no one can do for Jinnah's public character was much cleaner than Nehru and even Gandhi, a rare spotlessness. Having reached the level of Deputy Prime Minister Advani was only half a step away from prime ministership of India. He asserted his statesmanship one bit and said obvious things about Jinnah.

That is what undid Advani. If Jinnah was a secular man then BJP loses much of its ideology. Whatever could follow did follow. The ranks of BJP were left confused - intellectual sophistication is not a forte of even best ideologues of BJP, let alone the common cadre.

The parent organization, RSS, knew they had got whatever they could get out of Advani. RSS ideology is ruthlessly opportunistic and and it came into action. In spite of Brahministic character RSS chose to highlight and support Modi, the man who had shown Muslims of Gujrat their place in India. Modi bulldozed, as a result, all hurdles to reach the top level job in political India.

Amongst his actions in his journey Modi will be known for sidelining all the old big hands of BJP. If there are any representatives of the old guard then they too know their place. Rajnath Singh is one of them. The reality is that he can do little but to pass time. He is too senior to play second fiddle to Modi but Modi is too powerful to allow him much free hand.

Ideologically both have the same DNA, RSS. Yet even those ideological nuggets are of no use in the power dynamics. Mr Singh can not reach those levels of ruthlessness that Modi has under his belt. Thankfully. And that is the uneasy true.

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#64 [Permalink] Posted on 11th May 2016 08:23
Barelwis in a Tizzy


A Barelwi cleric, Tauqeer Raza Khan, visited Darul Uloom to unite Sunnis agains common enemy.

This has sent shock waves in the Barelwi world. His own brother cursing Maulwi Khan.

Here is an India Express report.
Quote:

In a move seen as a sign of reconciliation between two dominant schools of Islamic thought, Maulana Tauqeer Raza Khan, a noted Barelvi cleric, Monday paid a surprise visit to Darul Uloom Deoband, the seminary of the Deobandi school of thought. Khan interacted with the rector of the seminary, Mufti Abul Qasim Nomani, and emphasised the need for unity to fight the “common enemy”. The meeting took place as both clerics accused the government of deliberately trying to target Muslim men and drive a wedge between community members.

“This is the time for unity. We are as Indian as anybody else and we will do everything to protect the unity and integrity of the country. At the same time, we will not allow any forces to malign and sideline this vast community,” Khan said in Deoband.

He was in Uttar Pradesh’s Deoband to meet the family of Shakir Ansari, one of the three boys arrested by the Delhi Police for their suspected ideological leaning towards banned terror outfit, Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM).

After visiting the family, Khan took a surprising detour to Darul Uloom Deoband. The Barelvi and Deobandi school of thoughts have had differences over theological issues which in some instances have also led to violence. Even though the clerics from both sides interact with each other, it is very rare for a person from either side to visit the other’s seminary.

Khan claimed that the visit was necessitated due to the prevalent atmosphere in the country where Muslim men were being targeted.

“We might have some differences on religious issues, but we are united when our community faces any trouble. We will not allow any body to take advantage of our trivial differences…Officers influenced by RSS ideology are trying to malign the image of Muslims and Islam by arresting Muslim clerics in unfounded terror charges. But, they will not succeed in their designs…While sticking to our religious beliefs, we should get united to fight the common enemy. This is the only way out,” he said.

Khan holds sway among Barelvis as he is the descendant of Ahmad Raza Khan, a Hanafi jurist who is known to have started the Barelvi movement. Both the movements are named after towns in Uttar Pradesh — Deoband and Bareilly. While the Deobandi movement is known to be aligned with Wahhabism and is seen as puritanical and more austere, the Barelvi movement, in contrast, defends a more traditional South Asian version of the faith centered on Sufi mysticism.

Community watchers have claimed that the move of these two schools of thoughts coming together is in reaction to the increasing “anti Muslim policies” of the BJP government.

“There is a growing fear and perception amongst the community that it is being targetted and attempts are being made to divide it. The recently held Sufi conference was seen as a way of creating rift between the community. This meeting is significant as a message is being sent that it will be difficult to drive a wedge between the community now,” said Syed Zubair Ahmed, editor, Muslim Mirror.
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#65 [Permalink] Posted on 13th May 2016 17:32
In a move seen as a sign of reconciliation between two dominant schools of Islamic thought, Maulana Tauqeer Raza Khan, a noted Barelvi cleric, Monday paid a surprise visit to Darul Uloom Deoband, the seminary of the Deobandi school of thought. Khan interacted with the rector of the seminary, Mufti Abul Qasim Nomani, and emphasised the need for unity to fight the “common enemy”. The meeting took place as both clerics accused the government of deliberately trying to target Muslim men and drive a wedge between community members.
“This is the time for unity. We are as Indian as anybody else and we will do everything to protect the unity and integrity of the country. At the same time, we will not allow any forces to malign and sideline this vast community,” Khan said in Deoband.
He was in Uttar Pradesh’s Deoband to meet the family of Shakir Ansari, one of the three boys arrested by the Delhi Police for their suspected ideological leaning towards banned terror outfit, Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM).
After visiting the family, Khan took a surprising detour to Darul Uloom Deoband. The Barelvi and Deobandi school of thoughts have had differences over theological issues which in some instances have also led to violence. Even though the clerics from both sides interact with each other, it is very rare for a person from either side to visit the other’s seminary.
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#66 [Permalink] Posted on 13th May 2016 18:11
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#67 [Permalink] Posted on 14th May 2016 09:21
Inside Darul Uloom Deoband, a seminary under siege


Mohammad Ali


In the limelight: “Deoband is a kasba, a small town which is essentially defined by its association with the religious seminary.” File photo of Darul Uloom Deoband


Mohammad Saleem, 26, is browsing through the morning papers with a curiosity reserved for the unusual. Sipping tea at the grand-sounding Hotel Alfalah, which is but a regular snack joint, located just opposite the narrow lane which divides the landmark seminary Darul Uloom Deoband from the rest of the small town, he grows increasingly livid as he shuffles through the local pages of the Hindi dailies. Deoband-as-the-terrorism-hub is back in the media, a week after Shakir Ansari, a 22-old-resident, was arrested in the sleepy town 180 km away from the national capital on charges of being an sympathiser of a terrorist outfit.

“Again they are making a terrorist out of us. This is why we do not read Hindi newspapers. Such utter disregard for facts,” says Mr. Saleem, a maulvi from Darul Uloom Deoband, as he discards the paper in his hand and picks up the Urdu daily Inquilab instead. He is referring to the Hindi press insinuating “a well-entrenched network of terrorists’ sleeper cell and training module” in Deoband even as the Delhi Police released 10 of the 13 youth arrested due to lack of evidence linking them to the banned outfit Jaish-e-Mohammed (JeM). Shakir is still in custody.

Spin-off reports in the local Hindi press after the May 3 arrests included one about Shakir allegedly planning a terrorist attack on the Bharatiya Janata Party MLA from Thana Bawan constituency, Suresh Rana, incidentally an accused in the 2013 Muzaffarnagar riots. Mr. Rana had, in February this year, stirred a controversy by suggesting that Muslims living in Deoband planned “Pathankot-like terror attacks” while addressing a bypoll campaign meeting. Mr. Saleem’s issue with what he sees as a concerted media campaign to foist the badge of terrorism on the Islamic institution — and one that was closely involved with the freedom struggle — is that it is one of a piece with similar attempts of Hindutva groups owing allegiance to the BJP and the Sangh Parivar. This, when no intelligence agency has yet found any evidence of Darul Uloom Deoband fomenting Islamist terror.

Glorious past, present tense

Less than a kilometre away from the Alfalah hotel, past the white minarets of the nearby mosque and the wide red brick gates, one gets a sense of an institution — one of the most influential Islamic institutions in the world that frames Islamic discourse in the subcontinent — retreating further and further into its shell at being besieged. Students, research scholars, teachers and sympathisers betray a disturbing narrative, one in which the members of the Deoband community are on the defensive despite not having done anything that runs afoul of the law. The discomfiture is palpable — at having their nationalist credentials called into question and the badge of “terrorism” being pinned on the institution every time there is a terror attack or arrest in India and abroad; and at the simmering tension and sharp polarisation in the area three years after communal violence in nearby Muzaffarnagar claimed over 60 lives and displaced over 50,000 people.

Sitting on a chair in one of the rooms in the grand building, Maulana Ashraf Usmani, the spokesperson of the seminary, explains how the situation came to such a pass. “It is not just fatwa alone. Everything about Darul Uloom is up for demonisation,” he says even as the chorus of students learning the Hadith (the precepts and practices of Prophet Muhammad) floats in from the classrooms. The seminary’s Mohtamim (Vice-Chancellor), Maulana Qasim Nomani, a mufti and a maulana by training, seated on a thin mattress spread across the floor, describes his dilemma every time “a journalist from Delhi, unaware of Deoband’s glorious past, interrogates us about our patriotism”.

“There is an attempt to erase our contribution in the freedom struggle. Our statements are manipulated to sound like we are asking Muslims to become nation-loving citizens, as if they generally do not love their country. Every time we have to shout at the top of our voice about our nationalist credentials,” he says. Maulana Nomani asserts that love and sacrifice for the nation was “inherent” in the fabric of the seminary since it was set up in 1866 in the aftermath of the 1857 War of Independence. “People are not aware about the contribution of religious scholars from Deoband to the freedom movement. Maulana Mahmood-ul-Hasan [widely regarded as the first student at Darul Uloom Deoband and who later taught at the seminary] was a part of the nationalist government-in-exile set up in 1915 in Kabul which was headed by Raja Mahendra Pratap and had Maulana Barkatullah as foreign minister, in what is known as the Silk Letter Conspiracy. Deoband’s founding fathers such as Maulana Husain Ahmad Madani and Maulana Ozair Gul were arrested and kept under detention on the island of Malta for a number of years.” Maulana Usmani adds that in December 1919, Mahmood-ul-Hasan gave the fatwa of “tark-e-mawalat (boycott of goods)” to boycott every English product. “This was one of the effective instruments against the colonial rulers which later even Mahatma Gandhi adopted,” he says.

Later the leaders of Deoband supported Mahatma Gandhi and opposed the two-nation theory. “Tell me about any other organisation in the country with such a nationalist and glorious past. Those who are questioning people’s patriotism need to come clean about their own allegiance to the Constitution and their role in freedom movement,” Maulana Usmani chips in rhetorically. Maulana Nomani interjects, reminding how Darul Uloom Deoband was one of the first madrasas to issue a fatwa against terrorism. “To disappoint many who revel in our demonisation, I must say that what takes place here is the opposite of radicalisation.”

A secluded island

A subdivision of Saharanpur district in the western part of Uttar Pradesh, Deoband is a kasba, a small town which is essentially defined by its association with the religious seminary. But beyond the confines of the seminary housing 5,000 students, the urban population of the kasba has a 60:40 Muslim-Hindu ratio while the rural population is more or less equally divided. The interwoven social fabric has ensured that the town has been spared of communal violence for the longest time. “Even after the demolition of the Babri masjid, no Hindu-Muslim clash was reported. When Muzaffarnagar, Shamli and other places in the area were burning in 2013, Deoband, just twenty kilometres from the riots epicentre, stayed calm,” says Arvind Singhal, chairman of the local institute, Infinity College of Management.

There was a time, say Hindu elders of the area, when Darul Uloom Deoband would actively engage not only with the outer world but also its vicinity. Kuldeep Saith, whose family migrated from Pakistan decades before the Partition and who is one of the oldest residents of Deoband, remembers the time he used to play badminton with the children of senior Darul Uloom clergy at the local club, and of “mango parties” thrown by then-Vice-Chancellor Maulana Marghub-ur-Rehman in the Eighties. “There was people-to-people contact between the Deoband seminary and those outside. Sadly, that culture of interaction does not exist anymore,” he says. “It is because of the communication gap that there is a strong divide across religious lines and there is intense polarisation in the rural areas. Hindutva groups like the Bajrang Dal and Rashtriya Swayamsevak Singh have exploited this communication gap and deepened the divide among people,” he adds. Mr. Saith, in what rings very similar to Mr. Saleem’s grouse, decries the “baseless” reportage of the local press and the slandering of Muslims without “any evidence and proper trial”.

It hasn’t helped that the seminary itself isn’t willing to rise about its purist moorings, as evidenced in its dismissive view of the recent debate over triple talaq — after Shayara Bano, a 35-year-old woman, approached the Supreme Court demanding equality before law and seeking a ban on the practice — as “un-Islamic”. This, when 22 Muslim countries including Pakistan and Bangladesh have abolished it. The contradiction of its appeals to the secular democratic polity of India to uphold the rights of minorities in the country and its own failure to do its bit to protecting the rights of its own minorities couldn’t be starker. But the project of Darul Uloom Deoband embracing modernity even as it upholds tradition will proceed only if the media eschews ill-founded stereotypes of madrasas as nurseries of terror instead of peddling them.

mohammad.ali@thehindu.co.in

Source : The Hindu
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#68 [Permalink] Posted on 14th May 2016 19:47
LEADER OF BAREILLY SCHOOL OF THOUGHT FACES CRITICISM FROM HIS OWN FAMILY FOR HIS OUTREACH TO SCHOLARS OF DARUL ULOOM DEOBAND

Caravan Daily

NEW DELHI — Borrowing the language of his critics, renowned Islamic scholar of Barelvi school Maulana Tauqeer Raza Khan has hit back at his detractors warning them that if he opened his mouth “marriages of several people will become void and several of them will have to renew their faith in Islam.”

Maulana Tauqeer Raza Khan is the great grandson of the founder of Barelvi school of thought Maulana Ahmad Raza Khan Bareilly. On 8th May he took everyone by surprise by visiting Deoband and calling upon the rectors of Darul Uloom Deoband and Darul Uloom Waqf, Mufti Abul Qasim Naumani and Maulana Salim Qasmi.
During his visit, Maulana Tauqeer Raza Khan praised the role of Darul Uloom Deoband in the freedom struggle of the country, the protests of Deobandi scholars for his own release in 2010 when he was arrested for his alleged role in a communal riot in Bareilly and the persistent and successful legal fight by Maulana Arshad Madani for hundreds of Muslim youths implicated and detained in terror related cases.
However, his reconciliation move, being widely welcomed by the community, specially the youths, has been severely criticized by some of his family members who have raised serious objections on his visit and asked him to reaffirm his faith in Islam and should he fail to do so, they warned, his marriage would become void.

Maulana has reportedly advised his critics to do some self-assessment and reflect upon their own characters. “I know all of those who have married off their children and grandchildren in Deobandi families. They are not following the philosophy of Ala Hazrat [Ahmad Raza Khan] but the philosophy of accumulating wealth.”
He warned, “If I open my mouth marriages of several people will become void and several of them will have to renew their faith in Islam.”
“For the good of the community, to solve its problems and for its unity I will travel to Deoband again and again.” Maulana insisted. He said that because of disunity Muslims are suffering and its youths are being incarcerated in false cases
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#69 [Permalink] Posted on 11th July 2016 14:36
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#70 [Permalink] Posted on 4th October 2016 05:13
The dreadful times to come

Justice Markandeya Katju

Indians,
I do not wish to alarm or terrify you but only to tell you the truth.
The times which are coming in our sub continent will be so horrible that I, who am now 70 years of age, and have seen much in life, shudder to think about it.
I am reminded of Mark Antony;s speech in Act 3, Scene 1 of Shakespeare's ' Julius Caesar ' while he was before the corpse of the murdered Caesar :

" Domestic fury and fierce civil strife
Shall cumber all the parts of Italy.
Blood and destruction shall be so in use,
And dreadful objects so familiar,
That mothers shall but smile when they behold
Their infants quartered with the hands of war,
All pity choked with custom of fell deeds,
And Caesar’s spirit, ranging for revenge,
With Ate by his side come hot from hell,
Shall in these confines with a monarch’s voice
Cry “Havoc!” and let slip the dogs of war,
That this foul deed shall smell above the earth
With carrion men, groaning for burial. "

This was said of Italy in the past, but now it can be said of the coming times in India. There will be so much bloodshed and destruction ( my guess is that about 10% of the present population of India will perish ) that when mothers see their slaughtered children's bodies they will only smile, and men, unable to stand the agony, will plead to be buried quickly.
It will be a situation 1000 times worse than that at the end of the Mahabharata war when the wailing Kaurava widows and mothers cursed Krishna for not preventing it ( see on Youtube ' Gandhari's curse ' ).
Why do I say all this ? Let me explain
Our national aim must be to create a new India, which is highly prosperous, highly industrialized, and with its people enjoying a high standard of living.
But there are two powerful forces acting against this, one domestic, and the other international.
1. Domestic forces
India is presently passing through a transitional period in its history, from feudal agricultural society to modern Industrial society. At present we are neither totally feudal nor totally industrial, but somewhere in between. While we have achieved a certain partial level of industrialization, we still have a lot of remnants of feudalism in our society in the form of casteism, communalism,superstitions, etc.and have still to emere as a highly industrialized country, as in North America and Europe.
A transitional period by its very nature is a very painful and agonizing period in history, full of turbulence, turmoil and bloodshed. If we read the history of Europe from the 17th to 19th Centuries, when Europe was passing through its transition from feudalism to a modern industrial society, we find that this was a terrible period in Europe, full of turbulence, wars, revolutions, chaos, social churning, and intellectual ferment, with all kinds of theories of Voltaire, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Thomas Paine, etc, It was only after going through this fire that modern society emerged in Europe.
India is presently going through this fire. We are going through a very painful and agonizing period in our history which I think will last for around another 20 years.
For after all what is a transition in history ? It is a period when society is being turned topsy turvy, and is in a state of total confusion. The old feudal society is being torn apart and totally uprooted, and is being replaced by a new, modern society. Old values are being challenged and gradually destroyed, and supplanted by new values. As Shakespeare said in Macbeth " Fair is foul, and foul is fair ". In other words, what was regarded good earlier, e.g. the caste system, is now regarded bad ( at least by the enlightened sections of our society ), and what was regarded bad earlier, e.g. equality, education to women, etc is regarded good. The whole of society is thrown into chaos and confusion. Defenders of the old order are being challenged by modern minded proponents of the new.
At present in India there are still a lot of remnants of feudalism in the form of casteism, communalism, and superstitious thinking. Vote bank politics proves this. A mighty struggle will have to be waged by all patriotic Indians, who will have to make great sacrifices, to combat feudal ideas and destroy the feudal remnants in our society, and replace them with modern, scientific practices and ideas.
Can all this happen without a great deal of turmoil ? No, it cannot. There will be fierce resistance by the champions of the old, feudal order, who dislike changes. One may wish that the transition is without any pain or turbulence, but unfortunately that is not how history functions. So the next 20 years or so in India is likely to witness a lot of turbulence, turmoil and bloodshed before the new, modern prosperous society is created.
2. International forces
The developed countries do not wish India to emerge as a powerful industrial giant ( for which it has all the potential, with its large force of outstanding engineers, scientists and technicians, and immense natural resources ), because if it does, it will become a powerful rival to their own industries. Presently,the developed countries are reeling under an economic recession since several years, and if India becomes an industrial giant, that will add to their woes. So they will do their utmost to prevent it.
Presently India is the biggest purchaser of foreign weapons, spending billion of dollars on them, money which could be used for the welfare of our own people. But if it becomes highly industrialized, it will manufacture its own arms. What, then will happen to the super profits which the foreign arms manufacturers are making presently ?
So the developed countries will do every devilish thing to prevent this. They will instigate caste and communal hatred and violence, acting through their local agents, their running dogs ( as the Chinese would say ), and even try to bomb our country into the stone age, as the Americans tried in Vietnam, and the Russians in Afghanistan.
It is only a genuine revolution ( not the fake Gandhi type ) which can save our country. But historical experience has shown that about 10% of the people are killed in a revolution. For instance, at the end of the Chinese Revolution in 1949, the Chinese authorities made a rough calculation of the number of people killed in the Revolution ( which lasted from about 1924 to 1949 ), and found that about 10% of the Chinese people ( 500 millioi at that time ) had been killed in it. The Vietnamese people suffered 3 or 4 million deaths, out of the total population of about 40 million at that time ) in their revolution.
A genuine revolution witnesses a civil war, and a civil war is a terrible thing. All rules of combat, e.g. of the Geneva Conventions, are cast aside in such a war. It is a dirty, grisly war, often a war in the shadows, in which even innocent civilians, including women and children are not spared, Events, such as the terrible things which happened during the Spanish Civil War, in the Shanghai and Nanking massacres in China, and in Mylai in Vietnam, are common occurrences in such a war.
People will get so accustomed to seeing horrible deeds in such a war that, as Shakespeare said, mothers will only smile on seeing the dead bodies of their slaughtered children, and men in agony will plead for a quick burial.
I am sorry to paint such a scary picture, but unfortunately that is how history functions, and it is time someone told you the truth.

Source : Satyam Bruyat
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#71 [Permalink] Posted on 10th October 2016 09:38
Assalaamu alaikum
A petition has been filed in change dot org to safeguard the Muslim Personal Law in India. It has been started by Mufti Taufeeq Mansoor Mazahiri. Please sign this petition and share it on all possible social media channels.

I do not have permission to post a link. Please google it shouldn't be much hassle to find it

Jazak Allah
Wassalaam
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#72 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd October 2016 15:27
Dalits in AMU


A Barelwi colleague from Political Science Department today organized a meeting of some selected faculty memebers with Dalit intelligentsia in the Staff Club of the Aligarh Muslim University. In a few months the politically most significant state in India, UP or Uttar Pradesh, will undergo elections for state assembly. Big things are at stake. Another politically significant state, Bihar, gave the boot to RSS inspired political party, BJP, recently. If that performance is repeated in UP then it will be a big blow to the ruling dispensation in India. On the other hand if BJP wins then it will have very significant implications for the future of India. Position of Muslims will become even more precarious than it is at present. A Dalit professor from Delhi University said that for Dalits, the down troden, it will be a case of survival.

By the Grace of Allah the meeting was very encouraging as well as hope inspiring. In last twenty five years I never got such positive vibes as in this meeting today. Election will take place in February 2017. Some of us faculty members intend to hit the campaign trail for a month - including yours truly.
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#73 [Permalink] Posted on 25th October 2016 07:00
A brief history of religious intolerance in India

From very early times, India has witnessed religious and sectarian antagonisms.


(The article is by leftist historians)

Dec 24, 2015 · 05:30 pm Updated Dec 24, 2015 · 08:21 pm

DN Jha and Mukul Dube




At a time when religious bigotry has vitiated the air around us, it is worthwhile to investigate how old the idea of tolerance is and remind ourselves of the intolerance of our ancestors. Although early India had strong traditions of cultic and religious syncretism, there is plentiful evidence to prove the prevalence of religious and sectarian antagonisms from very early times.

In the 2nd century BC, Patanjali tells us that the relationship between Brahmins and Buddhists is like that between the snake and the mongoose; and its actual violent manifestation is supported by a plethora of historical evidence. Similarly, there is copious proof of the Shaiva-Vaishnava antagonism. The persistent animosity between Shaivism and Jainism, and the persecution of the latter by the former, is also well documented. In the 11th century Alberuni tells us that the Hindus are “haughty, foolishly vain and self-conceited” and “believe that there is no religion like theirs”.

But ignoring all this, Indian politicians constantly chant the aphoristic statement “vasudhaiva kutumbakam” (the world is one family) out of context.

Privileging Hinduism over others


The construct of tolerant Hinduism seems to be of relatively recent origin and to have first acquired visibility in the Western writings on India. In the 17th century, Francois Bernier (1620-1688), the French doctor who travelled widely in India, was one of the early Europeans to speak of Hindus as a tolerant people. In the 18th century the German philosopher Johann Gottfried Von Herder (1744-1803), the forerunner of the Romantic glorification of India, referred to the Hindus as “mild” and “tolerant” and as “the gentlest branch of humanity”. Around the same time, Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) said that they “do not hate the other religions but they believe they are also right”. Such views find a more prominent place in the writings of Orientalists like William Jones, according to whom, “the Hindus...would readily admit the truth of the Gospel but they contend that it is perfectly consistent with their Sastras”.

In the 19th century, some Indians also began to speak of the tolerance of Hindus, but they clearly privileged Hinduism over other religions. Dayananda Saraswati (1824-1883), who founded the Arya Samaj in 1875, claimed to believe “in a religion based on universal values... above the hostility of all creeds...”. But as a champion of the Vedic religion, he sharply opposed all other religions: to him, Mohammad was an “impostor” and Jesus “a very ordinary ignorant man, neither learned nor a yogi”. His contemporary Ramakrishna (1836-1886) spoke of the equality of religions, but in his view “the Hindu religion alone is the Sanatana Dharma”.

His disciple Vivekananda (1863-1904) also laid emphasis on toleration and picked up the famous Rigvedic passage “ekaüsad viprà vahudhà vadanti” (The wise speak of what is One in many ways) in support of his vision that “India alone [was] to be...the land of toleration”. But this was incompatible with his view that “from Pacific to the Atlantic for five hundred years blood ran all over the world” and “that is Mohammadanism”, even though his Rigvedic quote has become a cliché through being endlessly milked by politicians.

Similar views continued to be held by some leaders in the early 20th century. Bal Gangadhar Tilak (1856-1920), for example, couched his views in the vocabulary of tolerance and quite often cited the above Rigvedic passage but, in reality, espoused militant Hinduism. Even the Muslim-hater MS Golwalkar (1906-1973) spoke of the Hindus as the most tolerant people of the world, although this sounded like the devil quoting scripture, for he identified Muslims, Christians and Communists as internal threats to the country. It would appear that these leaders, from Dayananda to Golwalkar, used tolerance as a camouflage for Hindu belligerence: they privileged Hinduism over other religions and did not provide enough space to them. Unlike them, Mahatma Gandhi, who lived and died for communal harmony, genuinely found Hinduism to be the most tolerant of all religions even if his excessive pride in its inclusivism may have tended to make it exclusive.

Emphasising the syncretism

Many historians and social scientists have also spoken and written about the inclusive character of Hinduism and have produced much literature which highlights its syncretic traditions. Several instances of mutual accommodation among the various Hindu sects have been cited.

It is rightly held that the Buddha, founder of a heretic religion, emerged as an avatara of Vishnu around the middle of the 6th century AD. He figured as such in several Puranas and other texts including the Dashavataracharita of Kshemendra (11th century) and the Gitagovinda of Jayadeva (12th century) as well as in inscriptions and in the Kitabu-ul-Hind of Alberuni (11th century). Even sacrifice to him was recommended for those desirous of beauty. But, interestingly, he was also reviled as a thief and an atheist, and Shiva is believed to have appeared on Earth in the form of Shankara to combat the Buddha avatara, even though Shankara himself is described as an illegitimate child in a 14th century Vaishnava text.

The Vedantist philosopher Madhava Acharya (14th century) is often said to have displayed an exemplary tolerance of opposing points of view in his Sarvadarshanasamgraha (Collection of All Systems), which begins by presenting the school of Charvakas, criticises it and ends with Shankara’s Advaita “as the conclusion and crown of all philosophical systems”. But it is forgotten that this was in keeping with the traditional Indian practice of presenting the opponent’s view before refuting it.

Further, Adinatha (Rishabha), the first tirthanakara of Jainism, was accepted as an incarnation of Vishnu in the Bhagavatapurana. Christ was sometimes included in the incarnations of Vishnu, and the Muslim sect of Imam Shahis believed that the Imam was himself the tenth avatara of Vishnu and that the Quran was a part of the Atharvaveda. Akbar was sometimes thought of as the tenth avatara of Vishnu and Queen Victoria too was accepted as a Hindu goddess when a plague broke out in Bombay following an insult to her statue by some miscreants.

It is, however, missed in all this that neither Adinatha, nor the Imam, nor Christ, nor Akbar, nor even Victoria occupied an important place in the Brahmanical scheme of things. In other words, non-Brahmanical religions were not treated on par with Brahmanism but as religions which, although unwelcome, did exist and so had to be tolerated. It is difficult to say that the status of Islam and Christianity is no different in present-day India, although there is the argument that the attacks on them by the proponents of Hindutva do not represent Hinduism and Hindus.

We welcome your comments at letters@scroll.in.



Source : Scroll
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#74 [Permalink] Posted on 2nd November 2016 10:57
Cheating on Diwali


Have a look at this cheeky article. It is entitled On Cheating and Diwali Card Parties. It is well known fact that there is monumental gambling on this festival amongst Hindus. That cheating is a vice is a strange assertion. As if gambling was not. The picture attached has women too in it. As if it is a tradition for women to gamble on par with man. Pomposity and hypocricy really have no limits.
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#75 [Permalink] Posted on 28th November 2016 13:56
Eight RSS activists, including kin, arrested for murder of Muslim convert in Malappuram


The arrested have been identified as Pullani Vinod, 39, Pullani Sajeesh, 32, Pulikkal Haridasan, 30, Shaji, 39, Chanath Sunil, 39, Kalathil Pradeep, 32, Pallippadi Lijesh, 27 and Kottayil Jayaprakash.

According to the police, the accused belonged to a local Hindu right-wing organisation and included kin of the victim. Police have also started probe into the conspiracy behind the murder.

However, the police are still searching for the people who committed the crime. 32-year-old
Faisal had converted to Islam six months ago and was brutally hacked to death at Farook Nagar in Kodinhi, during the early hours on November 19.

Faisal P, alias Aneesh Kumar, son of Ananthan Nair, of Kodinhi, was found dead by the roadside at about 4 am by local residents. An auto rickshaw, which he had used for his transportation, was found abandoned by the dead body.

Faisal had received threats even from his family members after he accepted Islam.
Faisal, who is fondly known as Unni, returned home only four months ago after working in the Gulf for a year.

Source : Two Circles
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