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#16 [Permalink] Posted on 6th June 2015 13:28
Intellectual Crisis in Muslim Ummah

By Dr. Javed Jamil,

The Milli Gazette
Published Online: May 02, 2015
Print Issue: 1-15 May 2015

Recently I participated in a conference in Aligarh Muslim University on the subject of “Intellectual Crisis of Muslim Ummah: Rethinking Traditional Solutions”. I spoke in a session which had Dr. Rashid Shaz (the organiser of the conference) in chair and Mr. Zameeruddin Shah, V-C, Maulana Kalb-e Sadiq, Mr. Mujtaba Farooq, Prof. Ali Naqvi and Prof. Irfan Habib on the dais.
A majority of the speakers before me focused on divisions within the community, and several raised issues which could have created a storm had it been a public meeting. There were some speakers who looked hugely pessimistic about the possibility of any unity. Just before my turn to speak, Prof. Irfan Habib severely criticised Islamic scholars for trying to invoke Islamic principles in matters of science, and suggested that instead of focusing much on religion, a moderate path was what mankind should strive to find.
I began with a verse of the Qur’an,“kiatab-al-ladee anzalnaahu ilaika litukhrijan naasi minazzulumaati ilannoor”, which means, “This is the book which has been dispatched to you (O Muhammad) so that it can bring mankind out of layers of gloom, towards light.”
“Gloom” is a strange thing. The truth is that darkness is nothing in itself, as it has no entity of its own. Darkness only means absence of light, and this prevails only when light is either put off or is blocked. Unfortunately, the Ummah cannot see that the whole world today is enveloped in gloom and unless they recognise and understand the nature of this gloom, they would not be able to remove the gloom through the Light which they possess, but are not able to uncover it.
If anyone has the misconception that we are living in a world of science, he is wrong. If anyone thinks ethics have any role, he too is wrong, Religion, of course, has little role to play in the current world order. It is solely a world of economics with economic fundamentalism virtually ruling it.
We have been advised by a speaker that instead of religion we should adopt a middle course. I want to stress here that Islam is the middle course – al-wastiya – all other systems are tilted towards extremism. Commercialising evil is the hallmark of the modern systems.
There has been a lot of talk here about Muslim role in violent extremism. We discuss only the Muslim role and do not have the guts to discuss the Western role. For example, I want to ask a simple question: The persons who rammed planes into the Twin Towers on 9/11 perished in the act. The man who was accused as the mastermind was killed in an isolated operation about 12 years later in Pakistan...............
(plz read further in link)

www.milligazette.com/news/12250-intellectual-crisis-in-mu...
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#17 [Permalink] Posted on 16th June 2015 08:41
I was present in some of the events of this conference.
The gathering was of Jama-at-e-Islami type where Dr Rashid Saaz generously provided opportunity to young JI cadre to express their views. Of course many foreign scholars too were present as well as Indian scholars.
Because of his stance Dr Saaz is not universally accepted and the local Jama-at-e-Islami people were either absent or made very nominal appearance.

I benefitted personally in that Dr Saaz gave me huge discount on his books that I bought in toto.

For the record I do not agree with all of his theses and assertions.
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#18 [Permalink] Posted on 25th June 2015 10:31
A Damning Admission in India


Quote:


Since this new govt came, I have been told to go soft on accused (Hindu extremists): Special Public Prosecutor
Rohini Salian said she wants the NIA to officially denotify her from the case to which she was appointed in 2008, 'so that I am free to take up other cases, against the NIA, if need be'.




Rohini Salian said she wants the NIA to officially denotify her from the case to which she was appointed in 2008, 'so that I am free to take up other cases, against the NIA, if need be'.

Written by Sunanda Mehta | Mumbai/pune | Updated: June 25, 2015 10:44 am

Rohini Salian, Special Public Prosecutor in the case related to the Malegaon 2008 blasts in which four Muslims were killed during Ramzan and in which Hindu extremists are the accused, has said that over the past one year, since “the new government came to power,” she has been under pressure from the National Investigation Agency (NIA) to go “soft” in the case.

Also Read: Why alarm bell matters: this could show the way for other ‘Hindu’ cases

Soon after the NDA government came to power last year, she said, she got a call from one of the officers of the NIA — the agency investigating all the alleged Hindu extremist cases — asking to come over to speak with her. “He didn’t want to talk over the phone. He came and said to me that there is a message that I should go soft,” Salian told The Indian Express

Also Read: [Interview] The meaning very clearly was, don’t get us favourable orders: Rohini Salian

Matters came to a head this month, on June 12, she said, when just before one of the regular hearings in the case in the Sessions Court, she was told by the same NIA officer that “higher-ups” did not want her to appear in the court for the State of Maharashtra and that another advocate would attend the proceedings.




Salian, 68, a leading prosecutor who has handled important cases like the J J shootout, Borivili double murder, the Bharat Shah case and the Mulund blasts amongst others, said: “The meaning (of that message from the officer) is very clear — don’t get us favourable orders.”



She said she wants the NIA to officially denotify her from the case to which she was appointed in 2008, “so that I am free to take up other cases, against the NIA, if need be”.

The Malegaon blast, on September 29, 2008, claimed four lives and injured 79 while another blast at the same time in Modasa in Gujarat killed one. Initially, Muslims were seen as suspects in the case but it was under Hemant Karkare of the Maharashtra Anti-Terrorism Squad (ATS) that investigations led to alleged Hindu extremists based in Indore, as first reported by The Indian Express on October 23, 2010.



Investigations revealed the blasts were allegedly the handiwork of extremist Hindu organisations. Twelve people were arrested in the case, including Sadhvi Pragya Singh Thakur and Colonel Prasad Shrikant Purohit. Of the 12, four are on bail.

That probe — later given over to the NIA that was constituted after the 26/11 terror attack in which Karkare was killed — led to a relook at other cases: Malegaon blasts of 2006 (31 killed, 312 injured); 2007 Ajmer blast (3 killed, 15 injured); 2007 Mecca Masjid blast in Hyderabad (9 killed, 58 injured); and 2007 Samjhauta Express attack (68 killed, 13 injured). The probe found many common accused in these cases.

Salian said that the Supreme Court has now decreed that the case should be tried in a special court with a specially appointed judge to see to the matter. “So in a way it’s all back to square one,” said Salian.

On April 15, the Supreme Court held that the Malegaon accused cannot be charged under MCOCA since there was no evidence as on date. Opening the doors for their release on bail, it further said that the trial court should decide their bail plea on merit and without applicability of MCOCA, preferably within one month.

This, Salian said, now leaves it open for the accused to once again appeal for bail in the court under changed circumstances.

“A day before June 12, when the case came up again for regular hearing (in the trial court), the same officer who had come to my office came up to me and said there are instructions from higher-ups, someone else will appear instead of you. I said I was expecting this and, good, you have told me this, so please settle my bills…I also said that now they should now denotify me so that I can appear against the NIA in other matters — not this one — in the future. He must have conveyed it to the higher-ups and I am waiting for their action. I have not heard from anyone since then,” said Salian.

“The meaning (of the message from the government) is very clear — don’t get us favourable orders. Unfavourable orders are invited — that goes against the society,” said a perturbed Salian.

When asked how she saw the case proceeding further, Salian said, “For a layman or a fresh prosecutor it’s very difficult — one cannot do anything. Maybe they want to loosen it and ultimately lose the case because they can’t withdraw it.”


source : The Indian express
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#19 [Permalink] Posted on 7th July 2015 13:12
The Crux of the Problem in India


In 2010 Muslims constituted 23 % of the 6.9 billion world population.

Even at officially level the Muslim population of India today would amount to 200 million.
My suspicion is that India might be the biggest Muslim state in the world, bigger than Indonesia as well as Pakistan.

This huge Muslim population is completely ineffective in world affairs as well as the affairs of the Muslim Ummah.

The plain reason is that it is caught as a minority in a democracy.
In last 68 years of Indian independence from British the local social and political environment is increasing turning against Indian Muslims. Situation is reaching alarming proportions.

The solution to any problem depends upon correct and accurate diagnosis of the problem.

The diagnosis of the problems of Indian Muslims is the fact that Islam originated in Arab and the native Indian population, the majority, considers Islam to be a a foreign, alien religion and an imposter. Though few say it explicitly but by now there are enough people from the majority community who say these things vociferously.
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#20 [Permalink] Posted on 7th July 2015 14:07
Maripat wrote:
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If use that logic then every religion should be considered such in many lands. I mean all the whites in Australia are also aliens who came with a corrupted foreign religion. Virtually all of Africa for them Christianity is foreign, alien religion. They should all be animists I think. Such logic is so faulty to begin with. But these people one cannot reason with. Also for 1 moment we listen to them and accept this. Does the sins of our forefathers fall on our heads? Why don't these very Indians show the same hatred to Britain which colonolized them and robbed them of their resources, cause mass famine etc.
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#21 [Permalink] Posted on 7th July 2015 14:20
london786 wrote:
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bhai maripat did you get my email today?
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#22 [Permalink] Posted on 8th July 2015 10:04
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Yeah akhi.
In fact I also spent half an hour in polishing the transcrip but then I gave up because things of my interest were few and far between. Thus I request you to go ahead with your own draft.

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#23 [Permalink] Posted on 8th July 2015 10:42
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That is fine brother. Let us see what we can do.
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#24 [Permalink] Posted on 22nd July 2015 06:19
Narendra Modi


The hautiness, arrogance, pride, ...
I am sure our ancestors must have done enough sins otherwise this calamity would not have befallen us.

Source : YT
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#25 [Permalink] Posted on 25th July 2015 14:27
The Shashi Tharoor Speech in Oxford Union

Madam President and gentlemen, ladies of the house

I standing here with eight minutes in my hands in this venerable and rather magnificent institution, I was going to assure you that I belong to the Henry VIII School of public speaking - that as Henry VIII said to his wives 'I shall not keep you long'. But now finding myself the seventh speaker out of eight in what must already seem a rather long evening to you I rather feel like Henry VIII's the last wife. I know more or less of what expected of me but I am not sure how to do it any differently.

Perhaps what I should do is really try and pay attention to the arguments that have advanced by the Opposition today. We had for example Sir Richard Ottaway suggesting - challenging the very idea that it could be argued that the economic situation of the colonies was actually worsened by the experience of British colonialism.

Well I stand to offer you the Indian example, Sir Richard. India share of the world economy when Britain arrived on it's shores was 23 per cent, by the time the British left it was down to below 4 per cent. Why? Simply because India had been governed for the benefit of Britain.

Britain's rise for 200 years was financed by it's depredations in India. In fact Britain's industrial revolution was actually premised upon the de-industrialisation of India.

The handloom weaver's for example famed across the world whose products were exported around the world, Britain came right in. There were actually these weaver's making fine muslin as light as woven wear, it was said, and Britain came right in, smashed their thumbs, broke their looms, imposed tariffs and duties on their cloth and products and started, of course, taking their raw material from India and shipping back manufactured cloth flooding the world's markets with what became the products of the dark and satanic mills of the Victoria in England

That meant that the weavers in India became beggars and India went from being a world famous exporter of finished cloth into an importer when from having 27 per cent of the world trade to less than 2 per cent.

Meanwhile, colonialists like Robert Clive brought their rotten boroughs in England on the proceeds of their loot in India while taking the Hindi word loot into their dictionary as well as their habits.

And the British had the gall to call him Clive of India as if he belonged to the country, when all he really did was to ensure that much of the country belonged to him.

By the end of 19th century, the fact is that India was already Britain's biggest cash cow, the world's biggest purchaser of British goods and exports and the source for highly paid employment for British civil servants. We literally paid for our own oppression. And as has been pointed out, the worthy British Victorian families that made their money out of the slave economy, one fifth of the elites of the wealthy class in Britain in 19th century owed their money to transporting 3 million Africans across the waters. And in fact in 1833 when slavery was abolished and what happened was a compensation of 20 million pounds was paid not as reparations to those who had lost their lives or who had suffered or been oppressed by slavery but to those who had lost their property.

I was struck by the fact that your Wi-Fi password at this Union commemorates the name of Mr Gladstone - the great liberal hero. Well, I am very sorry his family was one of those who benefited from this compensation.

Staying with India between 15-29 million Indians died of starvation in British induced famines. The most famous example was, of course, was the great Bengal famine during the World War II when 4 million people died because Winston Churchill deliberately as a matter of written policy proceeded to divert essential supplies from civilians in Bengal to sturdy tummies and Europeans as reserve stockpiles.

He said that the starvation of anyway underfed Bengalis mattered much less than that of sturdy Greeks' - Churchill's actual quote. And when conscious stricken British officials wrote to him pointing out that people were dying because of this decision, he peevishly wrote in the margins of file, "Why hasn't Gandhi died yet?"

So, all notions that the British were trying to do their colonial enterprise out of enlightened despotism to try and bring the benefits of colonialism and civilisation to the benighted. Even I am sorry - Churchill's conduct in 1943 is simply one example of many that gave light to this myth.

As others have said on the proposition - violence and racism were the reality of the colonial experience. And no wonder that the sun never set on the British empire because even god couldn't trust the English in the dark.

Let me take the World War I as a very concrete example since the first speaker Mr. Lee suggested these couldn't be quantified. Let me quantify World War I for you. Again I am sorry from an Indian perspective as others have spoken abut the countries. One-sixth of all the British forces that fought in the war were Indian - 54 000 Indians actually lost their lives in that war, 65 000 were wounded and another 4000 remained missing or in prison.

Indian taxpayers had to cough up a 100 million pounds in that time's money. India supplied 17 million rounds of ammunition, 6,00,000 rifles and machine guns, 42 million garments were stitched and sent out of India and 1.3 million Indian personnel served in this war. I know all this because the commemoration of the centenary has just taken place.

But not just that, India had to supply 173,000 animals 370 million tonnes of supplies and in the end the total value of everything that was taken out of India and India by the way was suffering from recession at that time and poverty and hunger, was in today's money 8 billion pounds. You want quantification, it's available.

World War II, it was was even worse - 2.5 million Indians in uniform.

I won't believe it to the point but Britain's total war debt of 3 billion pounds in 1945 money, 1.25 billion was owed to India and never actually paid.

Somebody mentioned Scotland, well the fact is that colonialism actually cemented your union with Scotland. The Scots had actually tried to send colonies out before 1707, they had all failed, I am sorry to say. But, then of course, came union and India was available and there you had a disproportionate employment of Scots, I am sorry but Mr Mckinsey had to speak after me, engaged in this colonial enterprise as soldiers, as merchants, as agents, as employees and their earnings from India is what brought prosperity to Scotland, even pulled Scotland out of poverty.

Now that India is no longer there, no wonder the bonds are loosening. Now we have heard other arguments on this side and there has been a mention of railways. Well let me tell you first of all as my colleague the Jamaican High Commissioner has pointed out, the railways and roads were really built to serve British interests and not those of the local people but I might add that many countries have built railways and roads without having had to be colonalised in order to do so.

They were designed to carry raw materials from the hinterland into the ports to be shipped to Britain. And the fact is that the Indian or Jamaican or other colonial public - their needs were incidental. Transportation - there was no attempt made to match supply from demand from as transports, none what so ever.

Instead in fact the Indian railways were built with massive incentives offered by Britain to British investors, guaranteed out of Indian taxes paid by Indians with the result that you actually had one mile of Indian railway costing twice what it cost to built the same mile in Canada or Australia because there was so much money being paid in extravagant returns.

Britain made all the profits, controlled the technology, supplied all the equipment and absolutely all these benefits came as British private enterprise at Indian public risk. That was the railways as an accomplishment.

We are hearing about aid, I think it was Sir Richard Ottaway mentioned British aid to India. Well let me just point out that the British aid to India is about 0.4 per cent of India's GDP. The government of India actually spends more on fertiliser subsidies which might be an appropriate metaphor for that argument.

If I may point out as well that as my fellow speakers from the proposition have pointed out there have been incidents of racial violence, of loot, of massacres, of blood shed, of transportation and in India's case even one of our last Mughal emperors. Yes, may be today's Britains are not responsible for some of these reparations but the same speakers have pointed with pride to their foreign aid - you are not responsible for the people starving in Somalia but you give them aid surely the principle of reparation for what is the wrongs that have done cannot be denied.

It's been pointed out that for the example dehumanisation of Africans in the Caribbean, the massive psychological damage that has been done, the undermining of social traditions, of the property rights, of the authority structures of the societies - all in the interest of British colonialism and the fact remains that many of today's problems in these countries including the persistence and in some cases the creation of racial, of ethnic, of religious tensions were the direct result of colonialism. So there is a moral debt that needs to be paid.

Someone challenged reparations elsewhere. Well I am sorry Germany doesn't just give reparations to Israel, it also gives reparations to Poland perhaps some of the speakers here are too young to remember the dramatic picture of Charles William Brunt on his knees in the Walter Gaiter in 1970.

There are other examples, there is Italy's reparations to Libya, there is Japan's to Korea even Britain has paid reparations to the New Zealand Maoris. So it is not as if this is something that is unprecedented or unheard of that somehow opens some sort of nasty Pandora box.

No wonder professor Louis reminded us that he is from Texas. There is a wonderful expression in Texas that summarises the arguments of the opposition 'All hat and no cattle'.

Now, If I can just quickly look through the other notes that I was scribbling while they were speaking, there was a reference to democracy and rule of law. Let me say with the greatest possible respect, you cannot to be rich to oppress, enslave, kill, maim, torture people for 200 years and then celebrate the fact that they are democratic at the end of it.

We were denied democracy so we had to snatch it, seize it from you with the greatest of reluctance it was considered in India's case after 150 years of British rule and that too with limited franchise.

If I may just point out the arguments made by a couple of speakers. The first speaker Mr. Lee in particular conceded all the evil atrocities of the colonialism but essentially suggested that reparations won't really help, they won't help the right people, they would be use of propaganda tools, they will embolden people like Mr Mugabe. So, it's nice how in the old days, I am sorry to say that either people of the Caribbean used to frighten their children into behaving and sleeping by saying some Francis Drake would come up after them that was the legacy, now Mugabe will be there - the new sort of Francis Drake of our time.

The fact is very simply said, that we are not talking about reparations as a tool to empower anybody, they are a tool for you to atone, for the wrongs that have been done and I am quite prepared to accept the proposition that you can't evaluate, put a monetary sum to the kinds of horrors people have suffered.

Certainly no amount of money can expedite the loss of a loved one as somebody pointed out there. You are not going to figure out the exact amount but the principle is what matters.

The fact is that to speak blithely of sacrifices on both sides as an analogy was used here - a burglar comes into your house and sacks the place but stubs his toe and you say that there was sacrifice on both sides that I am sorry to say is not an acceptable argument. The truth is that we are not arguing specifically that vast some of money needs to be paid. The proposition before this house is the principle of owing reparations, not the fine points of how much is owed, to whom it should be paid. The question is, is there a debt, does Britain owe reparations?

As far as I am concerned, the ability to acknowledge your wrong that has been done, to simply say sorry will go a far far far longer way than some percentage of GDP in the form of aid.

What is required it seems to me is accepting the principle that reparations are owed.

Personally, I will be quiet happy if it was one pound a year for the next 200 years after the last 200 years of Britain in India.

Thank you very much madam President.
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#26 [Permalink] Posted on 25th July 2015 14:41
He said his things with humour but I have to do the same with tears in my eyes if and when there is an opportunity to talk about the position of Muslims in India.
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#27 [Permalink] Posted on 27th July 2015 08:54
What Shashi Tharoor Did


In eight minutes Shahsi Tharoor presented a case of a former British colony, India vis-a-vis her former colonizer.
It was Muslim India that the British colonized.
Hence the case should have been made by one of us Muslims.

And then there is the wider case of Muslims that were once colonized by the British or the Europeans in general.

The physical colonization was replaced by economic colonization of Muslim lands that still continues.
Is there any Muslim making their case?

Rajdeep Sardesai asked Tharoor where did he get his arguments.
Tharoor replied that he has been preparing these arguments from his student days.

Do we Muslims have that kind of preparartion and consistency?

Sadly we Muslims hardly any attention to these issues.
Do Sufis, Madarsa people, the Jama-at people pay any attention to it?

This sinner feels so lonely.

source : YT
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#28 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2015 10:46
Nerve Frying Night in India


Many of us in India could not sleep last night.
It was because of the last minute events in case of hanging of Yaquob Memon.
Yaquob Memon was accused in 1993 serial Mumbai blasts.
He had gone to Pakistan and returned to India convinced of his innocense and some understanding with the intelligence services.
He was finally betrayed last night.

Situation of Muslims in India is rather critical and brothers and sisters are requested to make most sincere supplications.


Mazhar Farooqui in Two Circles Network


The hanging of Yakub Memon will not shake Indian Muslims’s faith in the country’s judiciary and democratic values. That bit was already taken care of when Afzal Guru was sent to the gallows to satisfy the “collective conscience” of the society.

When the killers of Ishrat Jehan, Ahsan Jafri, Kausar Bi, Sadiq Sheikh, Sohrabuddin and countless others were not just let off the hook but also awarded with plum promotions.

When Narendra Modi, Amit Shah, DG Vanzara, PP Pandey etc. were given “clean chits” despite fluffy teddy bear without eyesing evidence.

When the blood thirsty PAC cops who murdered 43 Muslim youths in Hashimpura were acquitted by the court.

When Shiv Sena thugs who were named and shamed in the Srikrishna report for raping and killing hundreds of Muslims during the 1993 Mumbai riots were never brought to book and their leader was instead given a state funeral when he died a natural death.

When Kalyan Singh, who reneged on a Supreme Court affidavit pledging to protect the Babri Masjid, was detained in a posh guest house for just few hours as punishment for an act that led to the biggest riots in India since partition.

When convicted killers like Maya Kodnani and Babu Bajragni, who lorded over the massacre of Muslim women and children, were given a seemingly endless parole.

When the government launched a relentless witch hunt against people like Sanjiv Bhatt and Teesta Setalvad, who dared to stand for Muslims.

When brave Mumbai lawyer Shahid Azmi, who defended young Muslims framed on bogus terror charges, was gunned down and his killers were honourably discharged.

When the government at the Centre restrained the investigating agency to act against Hindu extremists facing trial in the Samjhauta Express and Mecca Masjid blast cases.

When fake encounters were trumpeted as genuine.

When a Times of India report found that a three-fourths of those given the death penalty belonged to backward classes, religious minorities and economically weaker sections.

So the bottom line is: Yaqub Memon’s hanging won’t alienate Muslims more than what some of these past events already have.

-
Mazhar Farooqui is a Dubai-based Indian journalist. This was first posted on his facebook wall.
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#29 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2015 11:37
Giving up Maulana Azad Syndrome


During Indian freedom struggle of India Muslims became aware of a very inconvenient reality.
Independent India will have a sizeable majority of Hindus over the minority of Muslims.
In democratic situation it simply meant that the majority will bulldoze the minority in any contentious issue.
The point was not lost on the colonial powers who were already using the divide and rule policy and it would hardly have been a revelation to them.
When Congree, the main freedom striggle party, did not concede the proposed solution this instability the Muslim League simply demanded a separate homeland for Muslims - Pakistan.
On August 14, 1947 they got that country but of necessity a large number of Muslims were left in India. In fact it is a near trifurcation of Muslims in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh.


Muslims of India, and they preferred themselves to stay in India, are now in the same situation but with much more severity, that lead to creation of Pakistan. They are the Muslim minority in Hindu majority country. Muslims are slightly over 14 percent while Hindus are slightly less than 80 percent.

At the time of partition the most prominant leader of Muslims in India was Maulana Abul Kalam Azad.
Leonard Mosley, historian of partition, wrote that he was the one who did the most for India's freedom.
But Azad committed a mistake.
He assumed that in independent India the majority community will automatically take care of minority interests.
After all we the Muslims of India had posed out faith in them by staying in India.
In last about seventy years the congress and socialist governments made an act of doing that but it was mainly tokenism.
In the meanwhile an ideology that contributed nil to freedom struggle has checkmated the Congress as well as the socialists and has captured the central power in india.
This is the RSS ideology.
This is a fascist ideology that is rabidly Islamophobic.

The naive belief that majority community of India will take care of the minority community of India is what I call the Maulana Azad Syndrome.

Muslims of India have to get out of this stupidity.
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#30 [Permalink] Posted on 30th July 2015 11:52
Number of Muslims in India


Latest data from Indian census say that India has 14.1 %Muslims.

This UN report says that India population today is 136 crore.

The Muslim population of India in this way turns out to be about 18.5 crore.
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